Unseen TOS....

Discussion in 'Fan Art' started by Warped9, Feb 5, 2021.

  1. Warped9

    Warped9 Admiral Admiral

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    Depends on how I choose to orient the decks. My previous 3D model was about 8 decks oriented lengthwise.

    Now that I have the main design sorted I’m pondering what the remaining details will look like.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2021
  2. publiusr

    publiusr Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Separating nose section for descent?
     
  3. Albertese

    Albertese Commodore Commodore

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    Here's my take on it so far. I'll make my own thread to document the project once it's all done. But I figured I would throw this out there just as a contribution to the ideas being discussed.

    I'm making slow progress. Here I'm showing you my working drawing and the current status of the model. I'm definitely going for skyscraper decks. The ring is about 4 inches across. I'm thinking the scale is the same as the old 18" AMT model kit.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    (Clickable thumbnails so I don't visually dominate W9's thread.)

    --Alex
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2021 at 1:45 PM
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  4. Warped9

    Warped9 Admiral Admiral

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    Cool! What is the ring made of?
     
  5. Albertese

    Albertese Commodore Commodore

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    Was installing a dryer some years ago and this ring was a fitting for the dryer hose, but didn't actually fit so I tossed it into my "save for a future modeling project" box. There's a lot more structure to the dryer hose fitting that I cut off to make it the right depth. Then I cut a couple small slots to accept the brass armature. Next I'll build a jig to make sure I'm setting the thing true square to the armature and use plumber's putty to take out the slop in the slots. Once all is said and done, the slots will be covered by the pylons.

    --Alex
     
  6. Warped9

    Warped9 Admiral Admiral

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    I went with a dual ring setup because it emulates what Jefferies drew in his concepts, but I did toy with a single ring as it’s tidier (and pissible more structurally sound).

    Although originally I was going to have two support pylons I went with Jefferies’ idea of one support pylon as it makes it look a bit less like a conventional rocketship.

    It would be interesting to know if and illustrator ever drew a fictional rocketship with rings on some old pulp sci-di book cover or magazine.
     
  7. BK613

    BK613 Commodore Commodore

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    This was the closest I found in five minutes of Googling:
    http://abitamysteryhouse.com/pictures/pulp18.jpg
     
  8. Warped9

    Warped9 Admiral Admiral

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    Thats weird. Looks like it’s from the 1920s or ‘30s.
     
  9. Redfern

    Redfern Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    And from the color palette, it might be the work of Frank R. Paul.

    ( placed that qualifier because odds are, somebody will come along to prove I was mistaken.)
     
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  10. STEPhon IT

    STEPhon IT Commodore Commodore

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    I know the notion isn't Star Trek, but is there any thought this thing could land? Ignoring ENT as anything related to TOS which it isn't to me, I was thinking with this design did the United Space Probe Agency already had a prototype transporter? Probably larger and maybe had one or two transporter pad.
     
  11. Warped9

    Warped9 Admiral Admiral

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    I think at this point, mid to late 21st century (Trek wise) we can safely rule out the transporter. And if we don’t land the entire ship, still approximately the size of the Enterprise’s secondary hull, that leaves a landing craft.

    That could be approached two ways. First is the conventional hangar bay idea where a vehicle is berthed inside the ship. The alternate approach is to have a perhaps larger craft attached to the mother ship’s exterior hull, wherein the craft can dock and undock yet always remains outside. This approach makes maintenance and repair more complicated yet it frees up space inside the mother ship’s hull.

    Also, depending on the crew complement, one or two sufficiently large auxiliary craft can serve as emergency lifeboats should the main ship need to be abandoned.
     
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  12. Warped9

    Warped9 Admiral Admiral

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    I've been giving the Valiant some further thought as I progress with the model.

    Perhaps the ship wouldn't look too rudimentary albeit still somewhat "primitive" compared to the Enterprise. Although the Valiant is meant to be an early FTL vessel remember that it would have to be sufficiently advanced to warrant the designation Galactic Survey Cruiser. That said I want to try avoiding any visual cues that could be misconstrued as having been lifted from Jefferies' Enterprise design. I sometimes finding myself slipping into the habit of considering things I've seen relatively recently rather than focus on what one would have been exposed to in the 1950s to mid 1960s.

    It has been reccounted numerous times that Jefferies had acquired images of sci-fi spacecraft as illustrated on the covers of books and magazines of the day. And that is besides whatever real world conjectural spacecraft art depicting what NASA might have been specularing about. It would be awesome to see examples of that rather than trying to go strictly by my own memory even though I do recall a general mindset and aesthetic from that time.

    I think one thing we can easily adhere to is the same constraint Roddenberry put upon ship design from the very beginning: no flaming exhausts and rocketship fins particularly as depicted in so much sci-fi art of the time.
     
  13. Albertese

    Albertese Commodore Commodore

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    Would that be mandatory? I can see that "no fins or rocket exhausts" rule for the Enterprise, But if the Valiant is 200 years older and the series is set about 200 years in our future, then maybe a more twentieth century approach to the older ship might have been on the table?

    --Alex
     
  14. Warped9

    Warped9 Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah, it’s tricky. The Botany Bay is somewhat advanced looking (by 1960’s standards), but it’s not radically different from what NASA was thinking about then. I’m aiming for something fifty or so years beyond that. It would most certainly look sophisticated and large enough to be beyond what they could contemplate building in the 1960s.

    If the Enterprise XCV-330 represents a prototype stage of this concept then thats a clue I can build on. The ringship E looks sizeable because of the rings, but the habitable part of the ship is rather modest. We can speculate once the concept is proven then the next purpose built ships could have significantly larger habitable areas and the rings needn’t be quite so large in relation to the ship’s overall size. The fact that Jefferies used only one support pylon suggests he was already contemplating as yet unknown materials and construction methods resulting in constructs structurally questionable (by our standards) yet nonetheless actually very sound and robust.

    We know warp nacelles (and warp rings) don’t actually produce thrust, but they convey the idea of very advanced “magical” science and technology. Impulse drives are very advanced in TOS’ era given how small and compact they can be in relation to the size of a starship. In the Valiant’s era impulse drives are more advanced then that used in the Botany Bay era, but could be sufficiently bulky for interstellar propulsion rather than interplanetary.

    I am basically thinking aloud, here, to check my reasoning.
     
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  15. Henoch

    Henoch Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    I bet his thinking was that the support pylons would be as small as possible to minimize the negative effects on the warp fields (warp drag?) similar to planes that got rid of second wings and wires and anything else that caused drag. And I agree, warp propulsion does not generate structural stress on the ship (unless you go warp 11 via Nomad improvements).