Production Order Group Viewing 2018

Discussion in 'Star Trek - The Original & Animated Series' started by Archivist13, May 8, 2018.

  1. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I got that bit of trivia from the recently released TAS "Official Guide"
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Star-Trek-Official-Guide-Animated/dp/1789093651
    I can only assume it's true, the book seems very well researched! :biggrin:

    THE TERRATIN INCIDENT

    This week, Star Trek does the sci-fi trope of the incredible shrinking man (well, people) :hugegrin:

    The technique of choice is the “reduce the space between the atoms” method of shrinking, presumably to avoid such pesky questions of where all the matter is going when they reduce in size. McCoy even mentions that even though the crew are shrinking, their weight remains the same.
    What goes unmentioned is the intense heat which would be generated by such rapid compression or what the weight of a fully grown man would do to a ladder made of matchsticks!
    But who needs physics anyway? :shrug:

    As is typical in “shrinking man” stories we see parts of the rooms normally out of sight – specifically, the door sensor. Kirk is so small by then that he has to wave a little pin at the “eye” which is fine, but how do they control the turbolift then? It’s operated by a handle 3 feet off the floor!
    Afterwards the crew continue to shrink, yet still manage to travel unimpeded throughout the entire ship! Are they abseiling down the Jefferies tubes for the equivalent of hundreds of feet, just to get from one deck to another? What about the miles of corridor between rooms even right next door to each other?
    It seems they solved the problem though, because after beaming Kirk down, Scott and his tiny team make it from the Transporter room to the Bridge in less than 10 minutes. I guess there really is no physical training in the galaxy that rivals Starfleet!
    These obvious obstacles remind me of the slapdash manner that “hyperspeed” was treated in Wink Of An Eye. But who needs to think about the consequences of your whacky scifi concept on a more than superficial level anyway?:brickwall:

    Whacky and poorly thought out physics aside, this is quite a tense and exciting episode. Kirk is very much a man on a mission this week, and who can blame him? His ship responded to a distress call and was then violently attacked, leading to physical mutation for the entire crew. His ship is damaged to the point where it can’t even leave orbit. The crew are rendered incapable of running the ship to the point where even routine activity becomes life threatening.
    Finally he makes contact with his antagonists who basically says “sorry, not sorry”. Uhura even tries to justify the Terratins’ actions! Everyone looks shocked when Kirk turns the phasers on their city but frankly they deserve it!

    Still, this is a Star Trek story and Kirk vows not to kill today. It’s a noble decision for Kirk’s character but an awful moral of the story in that the Terratins’ abhorrent methods end up getting them exactly what they wanted.
    It’s reminiscent of the Lorelei signal and the easy way the ladies seems to get away with decades of reprehensible actions. Just as in that tale, I like to think that their story is not going to end the way they expect. Giant rabbits seems a very fitting punishment for them :devil:

    Yeah, it's really odd how against the potential saving of lives he is. Has he got money riding on the outcome of their mapping mission? ;)

    Did Kirk phaser the Terratin city to loosen its foundations, thus allowing it to be beamed up?
    I agree that it's very unclear, except of course as a fake-out to make us think he was destroying the city. Even Spock seemed convinced! :devil:


    TREK TECH

    When the beam hits it causes major damage to the ship’s power system and Scotty delves into quite a bit of technical detail:
    SCOTT: Engineering. No casualties, Captain, but trouble aplenty with the engines. Every dilithium crystal connection's smashed in the warp engine circuitry. We're trying to bypass them now.​
    Unlike in the live action series where the central doodad in Engineering seemed to be where the dilithium paddles (and sometimes raw crystals) did there work, now this suggests that there's more cystals in the warp engines themselves. It is also possible to bypass the warp engine crystal circuits and yet still generate power somehow. Or is Scott just referring to the warp circuitry’s connection to some dilithium crystals elsewhere?
    KIRK: What about main circuits?
    SCOTT: Well, you have to see it to believe it, sir. Those big crystals in there have come apart. Each of them unpeeling like the rind of an orange.

    KIRK: Analysis, Spock.
    SCOTT: Our only hope now is rewiring impulse. But there are a thousand broken connections.​
    Confirmed – there are at least SIX crystals in the “main” circuits which apparently deal with all main ship systems, including impulse engines – but it can be bypassed to enable impulse power (something that Scotty was unable to do, sadly).
    I love how many more engineering spaces we are shown in TAS, it really helps to justify the "maze" of rooms that was alluded to several times in TOS but never got to see.
    One design choice oddity - when reporting that the tools are "too big" Gabler calls over from the “MAIN CIRCUITRY RM” which is only accessible via a waist height hatch. Who on earth signed off on THAT?

    The power generation (or conversion) function of the crystals is something implied by many TOS episodes but I find the number of crystals depicted extremely interesting since six is the number Kirk negotiated for in Mudd's Women. Could we be looking at the Enterprise in her most optimal state, just after a starbase layover perhaps?


    TWO CENTURIES

    This time interval is a classic from TOS and the Terra Ten colony being lost for “two centuries” fits in fairly well, since 200 years ago was when Zefram Cochrane had just discovered warp drive and the SS Valiant was out getting mixed up in the Galactic Barrier. Early Earth colonies are certainly possible from this time, but the Terratins are also au fait with Transporter technology! Did the writer of this episode really think that the invention of the teleporter pre-dated the discovery of FTL travel?
    I suppose we could argue that maybe just the beginning understanding of such mechanisms was around then, allowing the Terratins to remotely hijack the Enterprise’s transporter and beam down the Bridge crew.
    It’s still a stretch though. :rolleyes:
    Since the configuration of walls, doors and adjacent corridor details was never very consistent on TOS, I always assumed that there were multiple Transporter Rooms on board but that only one was ever active at any given time. I assumed that the intensity of the energy used quickly burns out the energising coils or something, necessitating frequent maintenance and downtime.
    Something we can assume is that this week there are multiple Transporter Rooms available and that #3 is the closest one to the Bridge.


    OTHER THOUGHTS:
    • The story starts off in traditional Trek style, investigating a burnt out supernova!
    • For some reason McCoy has various animals on Sickbay that he uses to test the seriousness of the situation. Has he been attending lectures by Dr Phlox?
    • In something occasionally seen in TOS, Chapel is back to using “out of the box thinking” when treating Sulu’s leg – then goes and somehow falls into the fish tank! Thankfully she’s not fully “damselled” and holds onto the bone knitter throughout.
    • Spock (maybe by accident) is quite complimentary to Chapel, saying “your uniform fits you as well as ever”. How nice of him to notice! :luvlove:
    • He’s also oddly sentimental with Kirk, wishing him “good luck” when beaming down to Terratin.
    • The miniature communicator that Spock rigs up at short notice is visually identical to a normal one! Was that level of attention really necessary, under the circumstances?
    • I’ve mentioned volcanoes being a bit of a TAS staple before, but this episode takes the biscuit – there are volcanoes so huge that they literally spout red hot magma into space!
    • Yet again, the transporter is used to fix the problem of the week – although in this case it does make sense, since the technology is specifically built around the rearrangement of molecules and putting them in their correct place.
      Kirk later orders the entire crew through the Transporter to restore them, but is that necessary? I would think that once the Terratins switch their beam off, there’s nothing stopping the crew’s atoms from returning to their original placement automatically
    • Why does Kirk the tool that functions like a microscope a "macro-scope"?
      Definitionally, wouldn’t a macroscope be used for looking at non-miniature sized objects? Like what our eyes do naturally?
    • Kirk really works hard to get the episode’s name into his closing captain’s log!
     
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  2. johnnybear

    johnnybear Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    No, Mytan, I accept your bit of trivia! no worries! :techman:
    JB
     
  3. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Nothing implied JB! I just meant that I have no way to verify it myself :techman:
     
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  4. Poltargyst

    Poltargyst Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    That is an interesting thought.

    Yes, in tiny form but still weighing as much as ever, they step on buttons on their consoles making me wonder if those buttons were really made to withstand the weight of a full grown man.
     
  5. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Just as in the Antman movie a couple of years ago, the "weigh the same" notion was mentioned once in order to "explain" shrinking from a scientific perspective, then immediately forgotten about before it could be further questioned.
    Probably best that way :whistle:
     
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  6. Henoch

    Henoch Commodore Premium Member

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    Maybe the ship's artificial gravity system some how adjusted its affects on the shrunken crew, so, even thought they had the same mass, their downward weight was much less.
     
  7. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    That gets around the weight issue nicely...until full sized Kirk beams back on board! :shrug:
     
  8. Poltargyst

    Poltargyst Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    I was thinking too about the fact that Kirk in his tiny form pulls Christine out of the fish tank. How did tiny Kirk pull the weight of a full grown woman out of that fish tank?
     
  9. Henoch

    Henoch Commodore Premium Member

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    With their increased density, why didn't Chapel just sink to bottom like a lead sinker?
     
  10. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Before that happened, the crew's reduced skin surface would cause them all to freeze and die.

    Thank goodness for the mysterious alien shrinking ray! It was on continuously throughout the shrinking process, so we have to assume that it somehow solved all these problems :whistle:

    It's an interesting point, especially as in the very next episode an alien gets beamed up to the Enterprise simply by snatching the communicator out of Kirk's hand shortly after the command to "beam up" was issued. However, I think it is consistent as for one thing the Transporter has beamed up many people in TOS simply by locking on to life signs. For another, Kirk ordered an "automatic return" which is a new phrase but may be a catchall term for "get me back up any way you can" . There's also apparently a hierarchy of options for beaming up a subject, so when Kirk's minature communicator was destroyed by lava (option 1) the Transporter defaulted to using life signs (option 2). Thankfully, he was the only full sized human on the planet! :biggrin:
     
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  11. Henoch

    Henoch Commodore Premium Member

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    I've use many macroscopes in my engineering lab and field work. They have low magnification optics, allowing detailed visual examination over magnifications from 2x up to 35x (I think newer ones go up to 100x). Some are binocular giving good depth perception. Samples can be examined in the as-is condition with no special preparation. Using a microscope, your sample needs to be very flat or pressed between glass slides. It looks like the crew shrank to about 1/16 inch, so, 10-20x is all your need to clearly see the crew.
     
  12. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Hey, I've learned something today! :techman:
    I honestly just assumed they'd invented the term to make it sound more science-fictiony

    But if both macro-scopes and micro-scopes make things larger to see, why are they called different names?
     
  13. Henoch

    Henoch Commodore Premium Member

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    It has to do with the level of magnification:
    Microscopes typically magnified several hundred times. Macroscopes typically are used 2x to 100x. A simple magnifying glass would be considered a macroscope. Most manufactures have moved away from the term "macroscope" these days, but during the 1980's (my era), it was a common term for this type of equipment. Some companies like Leica today still use the term in their product lines: https://www.leica-microsystems.com/products/stereo-microscopes-macroscopes/
     
  14. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Much appreciated, thanks! I tried a quick definition search during my lunch break but this clarifies the difference nicely :bolian:
     
  15. Poltargyst

    Poltargyst Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    The Eye of the Beholder

    [​IMG]

    Okay, not THAT Beholder...

    KIRK: The Captain of a ship, no matter his rank, must follow the book.

    KIRK said that? BAH HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA!!!!!

    MCCOY: It's still a risk.
    KIRK: That's why we're here, Bones.

    Risk is our business! Apparently McCoy forgot that speech. I mean he was sitting right there when Kirk gave it.

    I kinda think McCoy would have died had a tail that large fell on him and crushed him like that. Spock's solution to getting him out is eminently logical.

    A lot of banter and arguing between Spock and McCoy this episode. It doesn't come across as acrimonious so it's entertaining.

    Kirk is always so certain that he and his crew will survive and solve any situation, even situations that defeated/killed other crews. Kirk has no problem marching right in. He really doesn't believe in a no win scenario.

    Was McCoy really going to deem the water safe to drink just by looking at it? Although that does seem to be in keeping with how we've seen crew members handle such things in the past. (Wink of an Eye, Naked Time).

    I think this is the third time we've seen flying purple dragon beasties in this series. Infinite Vulcan and....what other episode?

    So last week Scotty was able to beam Kirk up after he'd dropped his communicator and it got slagged. Couldn't Scotty have beamed up the party after the beastie grabbed Kirk's communicator? I guess Scotty was too busy with the young slug.

    They didn't really need to show the young slug on the bridge. How did it fit in the turbolift anyway? Anything that needed to happen between Scotty and the slug could have happened in the Transporter room.

    It's really impressive that Kirk was able to resist the mental probe of one slug given how far their minds are beyond ours so that they had to plan on ganging up on Kirk. I've joked before that maybe Kirk is part Vulcan himself.

    The music is the same in every episode of TAS but I like it so I don't mind.

    SPOCK: They do not feel we belong in their zoo.

    Is that because they realized that humans are more advanced than they thought? Or like the Talosians have the slugs learned that Humans Can Not Be Contained?

    KIRK: Kirk to Enterprise. Prepare to beam aboard two parties, all human.

    Well, except for Spock...

    I guess the episode title means that whether one is ugly or stupid or zoo specimen or keeper depends on one's point of view.

    Here's an episode where Spock's awesome Vulcan mind powers do NOT save the day. Here's an episode where SCOTTY'S use of telepathy DOES save the day. Was Scotty able to communicate with his slug because it was a child whereas Spock couldn't communicate with the others because they were adults?

    Another episode a la Arena where we learn that humans are on our way to evolving to a higher life form, so we should get back in touch in millions of years when we're there.

    Entertaining episode. I thought it was a good mystery when we were trying to understand the presence of the different life forms and terrains of the planet.

    Alien Watch! Time to slug it out.

    Season One
    The Glommer
    Arex*
    Retlaw Plant
    Agmar and his Phylosian posse
    Swoopers
    Yellow winged bird guy (Aleek)
    Spock's teddy bear with fangs (sehlat)
    Green cat thing that sounds like Godzilla (le-matya)
    300 million year old alien on viewscreen log
    Green energy Redjac wannabe
    The Vendorian
    Lt. M'Ress
    Remarkably human-looking Taureans.
    The planet-eating, Majel Roddenberry-voiced cloud from another galaxy.
    Alien miners of Arcadia
    Rigelian hypnoid
    Giant rock creatures
    Remarkably human-looking (when they want to be except for that rebel Lucien guy) Megans
    Assorted heretofore unseen aliens on the Delta Triangle's ruling council
    The Kzinti (whom no one will mistake for Mensa candidates)
    Aquans, both stogy elders and rebellious kids.
    Sur-snake of Argo
    The scardy Bug Guy
    The Vedalian
    The...remarkably human-looking alien (?) Lara
    The not-a-Gorn lizard guy.
    Translucent gossamer mice!
    Glowing halo fish!
    The red beastie in the lake on Lactra Seven
    The dinosaur beastie that fell on McCoy on Lactra Seven
    The flying purple people eating dragons on Lactra Seven that look suspiciously like other flying purple people eating dragons we've seen.
    The telepathic slugs of Lactra Seven.
    Assorted aliens captured by the slugs of Lactra Seven.

    *by request
     
  16. Henoch

    Henoch Commodore Premium Member

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    We never see the survey vessel or know where it is, for that matter. I guess the budget got used up with the new planet and alien art needed for the episode, and they couldn't afford new ship art. :(
    It was shown Day of the Dove that the Enterprise can transport nine people at the same time. I guess it is safer not to exceed six.
    I wonder if there is a rule that the Captain should not be in a landing party if there is evidence of danger...:vulcan:...so, now let's send the Captain, First Officer and Chief Medical Officer (and no one else, not even red shirts) into an unknown situation where six trained Starfleet officers have gone missing. :brickwall:
     
  17. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    EYE OF THE BEHOLDER

    We begin with a rescue mission (traditional Trek) that quickly leads into a variation on the “encounter strange new lifeforms” plot that we saw a few times throughout TOS. There are communication issues reminiscent of first contact with the Horta (Devil In The Dark) but in terms of powerset the Lactrans have more in common with the Talosians (The Cage). However, their attitude is more akin to the Metrons (Arena) right down to the “we’ll see you in a few thousand years” message at the end of the episode. We also get the “humans do not belong in captivity” moral tucked in as well (The Menagerie).
    The scenes depicting the early attempts to make contact with the Lactrans are really well done – after all, communication ought never to be as easy as usually depicted in Star Trek.
    The character design is also excellent – we have giant space-slugs! For once, highly evolved intelligent creatures are depicted as totally non-humanoid. :techman:
    More than that, this episode effectively deconstructs this pop-culture version of Kirk, showing all the repercussions and consequences that such reckless behaviour would yield in real life.

    It begins with Kirk chewing out a command officer leading a rescue mission despite regulations prohibiting His lack of self awareness is mentioned by Spock, but Kirk seems oblivious to the hypocrisy and proceeds to lead the landing party himself, taking only Spock and McCoy for support. It almost seems he’s yearning for another D&D adventure, beaming down with his pals and only the bare minimum of trappings.
    Then they encounter a monster
    Then another one. :rolleyes:
    Throughout this Kirk takes the peril lightly and even after McCoy is crushed by that creature’s corpse the jokey banter is still flying back and forth. This is so disconnected from the events depicted that I have to wonder if we are seeing events from Kirk’s perspective – having survived so much in the last 3 years, he no longer takes deadly threats seriously. McCoy even states he was RUNING OUT OF AIR but Kirk dismisses this as a joke from his grousey friend. Honestly, it’s a miracle that McCoy didn’t even break a rib! Or if he did, would Kirk notice? :mad:

    When it comes to planning an escape, Kirk’s ingenuity comes up with the old “pretend to be sick” rouse. This tired trope only works because a Lactran child happens to be nearby, but the whole plan backfires when that child is accidentally abducted by the Enterprise. Kirk then feels the full weight of the adult Lactrans’ mental power who almost MELT HIS BRAINS. :eek:
    Apparently Kirk never even considered this as a possibility, so confident was he that his simplistic plan would succeed.
    And the admiralty have a problem with Picard’s hubris? :devil:

    Fortunately, Scotty saves the day. All by himself he makes contact with a new species, comes to an understanding and frees his comrades, all without firing a phaser or landing a punch!
    This was not part of Kirk’s plan. He wasn’t planning more than one move ahead, relying on his own derring-do to achieve victory. Sheet dumb luck placed the most competent office on the ship in the right place to resolve the situation.
    By all rights, Kirk should be dead. I wonder if he learned his lesson? :whistle:

    I think it was in The Jihad, guarding the temple

    Apparently McCoy learned nothing from those deaths - Spock’s barely though announcing that the lake water is “too pure” before McCoy announces that "it tastes just fine" and continues slurping it down! :eek:

    OTHER THOUGHTS:
    • When the landing party meet the second monster, Battle-cat’s roar makes a return – on perpetual loop!
    • How did Kirk know to concentrate fire on the monster’s underside of the neck. Why wouldn’t it just absorb the energy through there as well?
      Of course, the fact that it works just feeds Kirk’s ego trip.
    • Spock says that the alien city is 5 square kilometres in size and for some reason Kirk seems impressed by this. That area is equivalent to a square 2.236KM (less than a mile and half) on each side and smaller than medieval Constantinople (approx 6 square KM) which was the largest city in the world at that time. Is Kirk just being condescending to the non human aliens?
    • Lt Commander Markel presents as very polite, calling everyone “sir”. I suppose he does hold a lower rank but technically he is the ranking officer of his own vessel now, so aren’t he and Kirk equals?
      Then again, Commodore Stocker in The Deadly Years also addressed Kirk as “sir”, multiple times. Maybe they were both just awed by the legend that is James T Kirk? That is, before he got taken down a peg and almost died as a result of his poor decisions.
    With its tightly written first-contact story coupled with a long overdue analysis of Captin Kirk’s ego, this makes the 7th decent (or better) episode in a row - TAS’s writing is really getting into its stride now! :luvlove:
    While occasional themes and ideas from TOS might be reused in new contexts, it is clear that there’s no longer any need for unnecessary direct sequels to earlier episodes.
    What’s up next week?
    Oh.
    :wah:
     
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  18. Laura Cynthia Chambers

    Laura Cynthia Chambers Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Perhaps this is the first time he's been the boss of the ship.

    Stocker was affording Kirk courtesy. He was Kirk's guest, after all. Generally, guests defer to hosts unless otherwise asked/necessary.
     
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  19. Poltargyst

    Poltargyst Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    This would be an interesting character development. Kirk has escaped death so many times due to his ingenuity and the ingenuity of his crew, that he no longer fears death and begins taking bigger and bigger reckless risks. That would be interesting.
    Ah, good call.
     
  20. Poltargyst

    Poltargyst Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Once Upon a Planet

    Such poetic titles some of these episodes have.

    I do believe this is the last episode of Season One, correct?

    "Captain's log, stardate 5591.2. The crew of the Enterprise is ready for some well-deserved rest and recreation." Those giant telepathic slugs were pretty exhausting.

    It's our old friend, the Shore Leave planet. Not so friendly it seems.

    Uhura is singing again. When's the last time we heard that? The Changeling?

    How do McCoy and the others know that the playing cards and the other threats are real threats as opposed to the "fun" threats they encountered last time?

    The crew of the Enterprise are always so well versed in classic literature. I wonder how many people in 21st century America know Alice in Wonderland.

    Scotty is in command. Always trust Scotty. He saved the day last week.

    McCoy and Sulu DID talk about Alice and the rabbit despite McCoy's claims that he didn't think about that story.

    How many shuttles are in the shuttle bay?

    M'Ress and Arex are both in this episode, working together.

    Arex: "Lieutenant Arex, sir. Complete sensor scan of the planet surface shows no sign of Lieutenant Uhura. "

    So in a fairly short period of time, Arex can scan an entire planet and verify that one human is not on the surface of the planet. Seems like that ability would have come in handy in some previous episodes.

    M'Ress: "Enterprise. Lieutenant M'Ress here. (purr) "

    She sounds so hot. (purr)

    McCoy: "The Keeper's dead."
    Spock: "An astute medical observation, Doctor..."

    Spock brings the snark.

    I remember reading in TMOST how the rules for naming Vulcans included names that started with "s" and ended with "k". So Snark is actually a perfectly good name for a Vulcan.

    Sounds like the master computer wants a new job. I have been there, man. Have you tried sending resumes to GalacticMonster.com?

    Signs pointing the way. Ha ha.

    Oh, look, flying purple dragons. Haven't seen one of those in a while. Like since LAST WEEK.

    Spock: "It's quite real, Doctor...I think it prudent to remember that on this planet, anything we think may be used against us. We must monitor our thoughts and give our enemy no more ammunition. "

    No one think of the Sta-Puft marshmellow man!

    The helmsmen have seatbelts. Good idea considering how often they get thrown around.

    If the computer is trying to kill the Enterprise crew, why did it save Spock? Or is the master computer not in control of the flying whosiwhatsit that saved Spock?

    I was SO ready for Kirk to set a Logic Trap and talk the master computer to death.

    Kirk: Computer, what is your prime function?
    Computer: To provide whatever humans want for their amusement.
    Kirk: It would amuse me to watch you blow yourself to smithereens.
    Computer: I must blow myself to smithereens, but if I blow myself to smithereens, then I will not be able to provide for the amusement of humans, but to provide for the amusement of humans, I must blow myself to smithereens...error...error...mommy! POOF

    Instead, our heroes employ a kinder, gentler talking the computer to death, by listening to its feelings and offering it a solution to its problem. Seems like the Keeper was entertaining the computer. Without him, the computer got bored and went nutso. All it needs is someone to talk to.

    I'm not sure I'd be so quick to believe the computer had a change of heart.

    That is an awesome picnic at the end: McCoy, Sulu, Alice, the rabbit, the fire-breathing hydra. Good times.

    Kind of got a hint of The Changeling with the computer assuming the Enterprise was the REAL life form and the humans were insignificant. Is this another episode whose message warns of technology enslaving humans? The message seems more like humans and computers can coexist and serve one another.

    Alien Watch! No new aliens this week as they are all automatons. Is this the first episode with no new aliens?

    Season One
    The Glommer
    Arex*
    Retlaw Plant
    Agmar and his Phylosian posse
    Swoopers
    Yellow winged bird guy (Aleek)
    Spock's teddy bear with fangs (sehlat)
    Green cat thing that sounds like Godzilla (le-matya)
    300 million year old alien on viewscreen log
    Green energy Redjac wannabe
    The Vendorian
    Lt. M'Ress
    Remarkably human-looking Taureans.
    The planet-eating, Majel Roddenberry-voiced cloud from another galaxy.
    Alien miners of Arcadia
    Rigelian hypnoid
    Giant rock creatures
    Remarkably human-looking (when they want to be except for that rebel Lucien guy) Megans
    Assorted heretofore unseen aliens on the Delta Triangle's ruling council
    The Kzinti (whom no one will mistake for Mensa candidates)
    Aquans, both stogy elders and rebellious kids.
    Sur-snake of Argo
    The scardy Bug Guy
    The Vedalian
    The...remarkably human-looking alien (?) Lara
    The not-a-Gorn lizard guy.
    Translucent gossamer mice!
    Glowing halo fish!
    The red beastie in the lake on Lactra Seven
    The dinosaur beastie that fell on McCoy on Lactra Seven
    The flying purple people eating dragons on Lactra Seven that look suspiciously like other flying purple people eating dragons we've seen.
    The telepathic slugs of Lactra Seven.
    Assorted aliens captured by the slugs of Lactra Seven.

    *by request
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2020
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