News Star Trek: Discovery Season Two On Blu-Ray And DVD

Discussion in 'Star Trek: Discovery' started by AutoAdmin, Aug 3, 2019.

  1. Boris Skrbic

    Boris Skrbic Captain Captain

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    And that’s great — SDTVs can still be used to replicate the original viewing experience if an older show just isn’t available in HD+.

    UHD releases are still relatively young and limited, so that’s a bit different from DVD v Blu-ray.

    If a series available in HD isn’t worth watching in HD then I’d just skip it. Why subject one’s eyes and ears to hours upon hours in worse quality when better quality is available? Why miss out on all the detail a production put into a show? Maybe you save a few dollars but then it’s not worth your precious time, and how is the environment helped by companies still putting out both superior and inferior formats just because they sell?
     
  2. Reyman

    Reyman Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Some decent points here. I actually hold a very similar point of view to this when it comes to AV.

    However I will add from a personal point of view that there is very little need for SDTVs, particularly in 2 rooms. You can very easily and cheaply pick up a very good quality second hand plasma TV which will give you a far superior picture for SD and DVD content.

    Also the next big innovation in picture quality tech will likely be AI upscaling. However it's of very little use when it comes to DVDs, but does have a significant impact when it comes picture quality with Blu rays and HD content.

    Blu rays (HD content) still have some legs it seems, DVDs not so much. Blu rays may cost a little more, but imo you're definitely getting your monies worth from an AV point of view.
     
  3. fireproof78

    fireproof78 Admiral Admiral

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    Blu ray is too expensive for me to add. And, the video quality can look really weird to me. It's unsettlingly
     
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  4. Tuskin38

    Tuskin38 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    You’re forcing an awful lot of opinions onto other people. If they don’t want to watch HD, they don’t want to watch it.
     
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  5. Ovation

    Ovation Vice Admiral Admiral

    I decide whether it’s worth my “precious time”, not you (or anyone else). As for the environment, in this case there is no HD disc alternative (in fact, many current series are put out ONLY on DVD as a physical format and the HD version is ONLY available by streaming—a good number of them after disappointing sales for Blu-ray single season releases). Also, believe it or not, reliable and affordable broadband internet for HD streaming is not universally available, even in North America. Even less so for UHD streaming.
    I prefer free to cheap. The SDTV in the living room is used primarily by my wife (who has ZERO interest in upgrading unless the TV dies as she’s perfectly happy with SD) and half or more of the channels she watches are only SD anyway. The other SDTV is in the kids’ playroom for video games and half of those are vintage non-HD games. They suit our particular needs just fine.

    I own around 5000 movies and about 100 or so TV seasons of various shows. Probably a 60/40 HD/SD split (rough guess). I have, slowly, upgraded some SD material (and given away the SD versions to people who appreciate free stuff and also have my wife’s attitude to video quality). However, I don’t plan to upgrade all of it. As such, I’m very happy with my current projector (excellent SD to HD upscaling) and when I do upgrade the other displays, a critical feature will be the upscaling from SD (fully cognizant of the limitations involved).
     
  6. Reyman

    Reyman Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Also why I mentioned picking up a plasma as there isn't much out there that doesn't a better job with SD content, and it's unlikely that anything new will come along that does. The better second hand plasmas seem to actually be increasing in resale value too.

    Fair enough if you have people who still appreciate older tech. My mum didn't want to part with her black and white TV until the mid 00s.
     
  7. Boris Skrbic

    Boris Skrbic Captain Captain

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    Let’s not get sidetracked (too much) into the availability of broadband, shows which are only in SD on disc or the double-dip factor and gradual upgrades. Right now on Amazon, DSC S1 is $34.99 on Prime Video, $34.39 on Blu-ray and $29.96 on DVD. Why go for DVD if it’s half the quality at almost the same price?
     
  8. Tuskin38

    Tuskin38 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Why do you care such much?
     
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  9. Ovation

    Ovation Vice Admiral Admiral

    Well, those topics are important to those of us who watch things NOT Star Trek. Moreover, you made value judgements on the viewing choices of others regarding more than just Trek.

    IF the discussion was limited to Trek, specifically DSC, then I would agree the Blu-ray is worth the extra 5$—to me. However, I wouldn’t presume it was so for everyone else who might be interested. THAT’S the bit (assuming it’s true for everyone, along with dismissing the many reasons why it’s NOT true for everyone, as explained to you at some length) that’s generating a certain degree of frustration among your fellow posters.
     
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  10. fireproof78

    fireproof78 Admiral Admiral

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    Because streaming is inconsistent in my area due to the Internet I have, I already own a DVD player and have no desire to purchase Blu Ray, and I like having physical media.
     
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  11. Boris Skrbic

    Boris Skrbic Captain Captain

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    Those topics are important to the extent that one should strive to solve the issues. Sure, there are always limitations of some sort. I also watch shows on DVD when they’re not available on Blu-ray or in HD streaming locally. However, it’s not subjective in the sense that one would normally and forever prefer worse to better, unless the HD presentation has serious shortcomings (eg. when opening up or cropping 4:3 for widescreen, DNR issues in certain transfers, availability of original or alternate versions).

    If people don’t care, that’s fine — but they should be inspired to at every opportunity. If someone is binge-watching a show on a poor TV, suggest the better option in the house. If you can catch a movie anywhere but need tickets purchased in advance for IMAX, do that if the movie matters. Similarly, if we see that DSC is available only on slightly cheaper DVD, make sure it’s pointed out. Even a small step is enough, but let’s not pretend that DVD is some kind of a holy personal choice to feel protective about.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
  12. Boris Skrbic

    Boris Skrbic Captain Captain

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    A Blu-ray player would be a one-time upgrade, as opposed to the number of times you’d be spending only a little less for half the quality.
     
  13. Ovation

    Ovation Vice Admiral Admiral

    Do you own stocks in HD gear and media companies? Own an A/V store? It’s the ONLY logical reason for you to persist in telling others “they MUST care” about formats to such an incessant degree.

    In any case, I’m off to hook up my VCR to the home cinema so I can watch my pan and scan version of Blade Runner (despite owning a UHD copy with Blu-ray in anticipation of an eventual display upgrade)—BECAUSE I CAN! :p
     
  14. Tuskin38

    Tuskin38 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Again, why do you care?
     
  15. Boris Skrbic

    Boris Skrbic Captain Captain

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    See, there it is again: why be sensitive about my arguing for the best format possible? Do I need to repeat that one needn’t even watch DSC if one doesn’t care for lore, or that the cheaper Netflix subscription and Dolby Vision are preferable to Blu-ray (in countries where DSC is on Netflix) in solid streaming conditions?

    Why look for more ulterior motives than me having internalized future tech since watching TNG in the 1990s and wondering why enough Star Trek fans might still be happy collecting DVDs? I’m not even a first adopter (though I become interested almost immediately), but at some point enough is obviously enough.
     
  16. fireproof78

    fireproof78 Admiral Admiral

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    The cost adds up, because each blu ray is more. The quality is simply not important enough to me to rework the economics when I have equipment that works.
     
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  17. cultcross

    cultcross We truly were a song of ice and fire Moderator

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    That would be quite a dickish thing to do, really. You don't criticise people's tech in polite society.

    A one off expense, followed by many smaller expenses for the pricier format, and for many people money is tight. It may not be for you, that's great. But for others, the additional regular costs of buying in HD just make it too expensive, or mean they have to buy fewer movies/series than they otherwise could.

    Blu-Rays also, for me, have features that I find annoying. They load much slower than DVDs, and on my system, which I won't be spending a "one off cost" to change, they don't retain their place when turned off like DVDs do. I also like to play DVDs on the PC on occasion and I don't have a Blu Ray drive.

    Plus, some people just don't get a lot out of very brilliant picture quality, if you don't have the eyesight to appreciate the difference, or alternatively just don't care about the difference, why spend the money?

    There are a lot of reasons people would still buy DVDs, and there probably will be until physical media dies entirely.
     
  18. Tuskin38

    Tuskin38 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Like I'm 100% for Blu-Ray, I haven't bought a stand alone DVD in years (some Blu-Ray packages come bundled with DVDs). But I'm not going to nag someone into buying a Blu-Ray player if they don't want to.
     
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  19. Boris Skrbic

    Boris Skrbic Captain Captain

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    Why assume the worst? I was thinking more along the lines of “You know what, that OLED is really going to make this series shine, and let me turn off motion smoothing, you don’t want that.”

    Then they’ll become more selective (which I try to be as well) or prefer a streaming subscription and solid broadband to obsolescent disc purchases that cost too much in relation to their quality. I don’t buy the Netflix stuff on Blu-ray either, especially when it’s available in HDR there. There are many ways to optimize purchases without going back to DVD when HD is available. Technology drives down costs in the long term.

    That’s true, which is why streaming is much more comfortable where available and comparable in quality.

    Poor eyesight when it cannot be fixed: sure, but if people don’t care, they should be inspired to at every opportunity.
     
  20. Tuskin38

    Tuskin38 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I'm sure when they stop selling DVDs they'll switch to Blu-ray or just streaming.