Bad Language in Discovery

Discussion in 'Star Trek: Discovery' started by Jamie Calderhead, Oct 21, 2017.

  1. MakeshiftPython

    MakeshiftPython Commodore Commodore

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    Mudd always finds himself getting a relatively harmless but poetic comeuppance at the end of an episode. That's how it always goes. The worst being that he's left behind in a Klingon prison cell.
     
  2. GeekUSACarl

    GeekUSACarl The Last Starfighter Fleet Captain

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    Witnesses always have to be taken with context.

    And in this context we have a man who's mind and personality are being altered by an experimental drive system, insisting Mudd murdered people that are very well alive?
     
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  3. The Librarian

    The Librarian Commodore Commodore

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    Spamming this over and over while changing a few words to fit the particular topic doesn't make any sense either.
     
  4. Turtletrekker

    Turtletrekker Admiral Admiral

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    I think Harry would rather face Klingon prison than the 500 "Stella" androids that Kirk left him with at the end of "I Mudd". ;):lol:

     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2017
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  5. ralfy

    ralfy Captain Captain

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    I wonder if it was merely a censorship issue. That is, writers from TOS onward wanted main characters to say "fuck" and "shit," and not just once. And assuming that there is such evidence, what's more important are their reasons for wanting thus.

    The second point is valid, together with burritos and disco music. But what's the point of doing that in light of the story, or what it simply an example of gratuitous use of profanity? If so, then doesn't that support what I've said?
     
  6. MakeshiftPython

    MakeshiftPython Commodore Commodore

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    So barbaric of Kirk.
     
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  7. ralfy

    ralfy Captain Captain

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    Indeed, one gets this feeling that Tilly's utterance is symptomatic of such problems affecting the series.
     
  8. MakeshiftPython

    MakeshiftPython Commodore Commodore

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    Whether the writers of TOS would or wouldn't have used an f-bomb is irrelevant, because they were the writers of TOS, not the writers of DISCO.

    We couldn't have had Jean-Luc Picard say "son of a bitch" in 1987, but by 2001 Jonathan Archer could call the Vulcans that like it was as natural as breathing.

    Times change.
     
  9. FrankT

    FrankT Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Yeah, I saw this coming a mile off.
     
  10. Thotch

    Thotch Cadet Newbie

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    I'd read in the press the f-bomb was coming up and expected it to really jar on me but when it was said I didn't feel it out of place. Guess I've been desensitised to f-bombs on TV since the earlier ST incarnations and Discovery has a darker tone than the rest too so I didn't find it shocking. Not sure what Roddenberry would have thought though!
     
  11. Turtletrekker

    Turtletrekker Admiral Admiral

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    Roddenberry wrote the shooting script in which Kirk flipped out his communicator and said "Let's get the hell out of here". In 1967. This was one of the first times the word "hell" was used on broadcast TV and is considered one of the first uses of profanity on TV. I think he'd be fine with it.
     
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  12. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Admiral

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    Exactly. And Star Trek does not exist in a bubble outside of time and the rest of pop culture. Any new version is always going to reflect current trends in society and show biz. We're probably not going to see a lot of beehive hairdos on DISCOVERY either, or beautiful female guest-stars shot through Vaseline. :)
     
  13. MakeshiftPython

    MakeshiftPython Commodore Commodore

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    At least the first time "hell" said in that context for Trek. Kirk had already uttered it in during the ending of "Space Seed" saying "it's better to rule in hell than to serve in heaven".

    I know they even said "damning" at some point in the series but can't remember.

    Suffice it to say, it was at least an indication that television was slowly growing more comfortable having characters swear on television in the late 60s that by the 70s it wasn't all out of place.

    I mean if we wanted television to remain rigid to the standards of the past, we'd still have couples having separate beds in the same room. I mean THAT was ridiculous.
     
  14. GeekUSACarl

    GeekUSACarl The Last Starfighter Fleet Captain

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    I think in some ways it's become more rigid. I watch cheers or even Seinfeld from time to time I think "nope, wouldn't be allowed on tv now"
     
  15. MakeshiftPython

    MakeshiftPython Commodore Commodore

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  16. cultcross

    cultcross The Slay of the Doctor Moderator

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    Acceptance of swear words, nudity and violence has gone up, while acceptance of homophobia, racism and misogyny is going down. There are plotlines, dialogue or jokes in shows only a decade or so old that wouldn't be used today. I happened to watch the episode Pathfinder today, and the stereotype female secretary on the Admiral's intercom seemed so anachronistic it amazed me that it was in a modern show until I realised it wasn't - Voyager is of its time; that scene wouldn't play that way today.
     
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  17. MakeshiftPython

    MakeshiftPython Commodore Commodore

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    The non-acknowledgement of gay crew members is kind of embarrassing. I can kind of understand why we never see that happen on TNG as it would have been more taboo in the 80s and 90s, but it was a little more absurd by the 2000s with Enterprise.

    One thing I liked seeing in the last episode were two extras in the background kissing. It was refreshing to see something like that in Star Trek. A detail I always liked in "The Cage" was seeing two officer extras out of uniform likely heading for a social event on the ship as Pike was heading for his cabin. It showed you that this wasn't an unusual thing to see in the corridors. I wish we saw that being a more common thing in Voyager, which always felt way too stuffy.
     
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  18. cultcross

    cultcross The Slay of the Doctor Moderator

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    Indeed - of all the shows, it would make sense on Voyager. The premise holds that they're setting out on a near generational voyage. It was silly that we never really saw them unclench.
     
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  19. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Admiral

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    Re: "The Cage: I like to think of those two officers in beachwear as Gidget and Moondoggie.

    And, yes, I'm showing my age there. :)
     
  20. Ithekro

    Ithekro Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I'm pretty sure Moondoggie is a lounge singer by the time of Camp Khitomer.

    Gidget was MIA after Organia.
     
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