Trek guest actors in maybe surprising roles

Discussion in 'Star Trek - The Original & Animated Series' started by Maurice, Mar 12, 2013.

  1. FormerLurker

    FormerLurker Commodore Commodore

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    Yes, and I came ><this close to conflating the two. I remembered just in time.

    At least Mariette Hartley is a TOS alumna. Gotta slip the thread theme in there somehow.
     
  2. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    I'm sure this has come up a time or two upthread, but the niftiest Hulk connection is that both of the men who supplied the creature's growls were Trek alumni: Ted Cassidy (who also did the opening narration) and Charles Napier (who also guested as onscreen characters three times, IIRC).
     
  3. johnnybear

    johnnybear Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Gene Lyons in Ticket To Alaska, an episode of The Fugitive!
    JB
     
  4. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Vic gets his mugshot this time:
    Dragnet68.jpg
    (Dragnet 1968, "The Big Gambler," Mar. 21, 1968)
     
  5. GNDN18

    GNDN18 If it's what you say I love it. Premium Member

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    Twelve years, Sergeant Friday, or twelve thousand. Whatever the penalty prescribed by law is. We now return control of your television set to you.
     
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  6. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Not more than ten. :p
     
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  7. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Just watched Rebel Without a Cause for the first time since high school, and there's Ian Wolfe manning Griffith Observatory's planet...arium.
     
  8. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    I've been watching the Logan's Run TV series on DVD, and so far, halfway through the show's single 14-episode season, I've seen Morgan Woodward (and VGR's Anthony DeLongis) in the pilot, Leslie Parrish in episode 2, and Liam Sullivan (briefly) in episode 7. Surprisingly few Trek guests for a show story-edited by D.C. Fontana. We've had more Trek-veteran writers, though -- Fontana, TAS's James Schmerer, David Gerrold, Shimon Wincelberg, and Harlan Ellison, plus George Clayton Johnson as co-author of the original Logan's Run novel.
     
  9. johnnybear

    johnnybear Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Well Morgan Woodward turns up again in two more episodes along with Paul Carr, Mariette Hartley, Barbara Babcock and Lou Elias as a Zedor guard! :techman:
    JB
     
  10. Forbin

    Forbin Admiral Admiral

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    Oh yeah, speaking of Ian Wolfe - he shows up as a judge near the end of the 1952 Les Miserables, with Michael Rennie as Jean Valjean.
     
  11. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    MeTV is currently airing a 1964 episode of Bonanza in which William Marshall plays a famous singer who encounters prejudice in Virginia City when people meet him in the flesh. The really odd thing here is that there's an angle in which he's mistaken for a runaway slave who has a reward on his head in St. Louis...which places the episode squarely pre-Civil War, when I was under the impression that the show had the typical default Western setting of sometime post-Civil War. I can see playing loosey goosey with exactly when a Western takes place, but the Civil War is kind of a big chronological line to cross willy nilly.
     
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  12. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Wikipedia says Bonanza was set in the 1860s, but it seemed to have both pre- and post-Civil War episodes. It mentions the episode you're referring to, saying that the singer objects to the Dred Scott Decision, which would seem to place the episode in 1857.
     
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  13. XCV330

    XCV330 A Being of Pure Caffeine Premium Member

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    it was on for 14 seasons, not that it had any real continuity that I'm aware of (I watched it a lot but not in any kind of sequence I remember, and they reused scripts more than once. ) but even so, they could have stretched it out from the 1850's right into the Grant years
     
  14. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    I'm reminded of one of the Filmation Saturday morning cartoons of my youth, The New Adventures of the Lone Ranger, which used its stories to teach US history and covered events ranging from the brief run of the Pony Express in 1860-61 to the Oklahoma Land Rush in 1889 -- and yet the Ranger, Tonto, and their horses remain ageless and unchanging over this span of nearly three decades (which is not presented in any kind of chronological order). So teaching history and playing fast and loose with it at the same time.
     
  15. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Yeah, I read that info on the Wiki while the episode was on. In general, I'd say that Westerns that aren't explicitly set before or during the Civil War stay set after it. Sometimes it's more explicit...e.g., being a Civil War veteran was a routinely referenced part of Lucas McCain's backstory on The Rifleman. And there you had less of a fudge factor to give or take a decade, because he had a growing son.
     
  16. J.T.B.

    J.T.B. Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    There's an early Bonanza about pre-Civil War tensions stirring things up in Virginia City. Which was a surprise to me, with all the 1873 Colts and 1892 Winchesters around.
     
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  17. Forbin

    Forbin Admiral Admiral

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    I look to the firearms for western time periods (but of course the production rarely cares about that detail). The classic Colt Single Action Army (SAA) six-shooter was first made in 1873, as was the classic Winchester rifle. Brass-frame Henry lever-rifles were available during the Civil War, but the average handgun pre-1873 would be a cap-and-ball black powder revolver, not a cartridge arm like the SAA. That said, most westerns totally ignore such temporal accuracy, and equip their casts with random period arms. Winchester rifles are often the 1892 model, which is sturdier than the '73. Handguns are usually cartridge types for ease of blank loading, and we've even seen modern (well, turn of the century) double-action police revolvers subbing for proper western-period models.
    Heck, John Wayne carried his '73 Colt and an 1892 Winchester in a movie set in the 1840s (The Comancheros)!
     
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  18. ZapBrannigan

    ZapBrannigan Commodore Commodore

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    The other day I was channel surfing and hit upon Leonard Nimoy as an American Indian in Rawhide. The channel popped up and there was a close-up of Nimoy in a "He had a lot of lines for an Indian!" type of role. This was 1961, a b&w show:

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0683027/

    Clint Eastwood was tied up and being held hostage in the scene. He was a good-looking dude, too. I wonder if he did anything after that.
     
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  19. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    TOS guests in the second half of the Logan's Run TV series include a returning Morgan Woodward (twice), Mariette Hartley, Barbara Babcock, and Paul Carr, all in separate episodes, plus TNG's Nehemiah Persoff. The only TOS writers in the second half are John Meredyth Lucas and story editor D.C. Fontana, though two writers, Katharyn Powers and Michael Michaelian, would reunite with Fontana on TNG's first season.
     
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  20. Forbin

    Forbin Admiral Admiral

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    I keep forgetting to mention during my Mod Squad binge, that Harve Bennet's name is on every episode with a list of others under "developed by."