Spoilers TNG: Pliable Truths by Dayton Ward - Review thread

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    Votes: 9 52.9%
  • Above Average

    Votes: 3 17.6%
  • Average

    Votes: 5 29.4%
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    17
Something the continuity light TNG would not come back to

Amusing how standards change. TNG had pretty solid continuity by the standards of its day, and certainly much more than TOS had. A truly "continuity-light" show would not have done "Family." Although it is a disappointment that it didn't do something similar in the wake of "Chain of Command" or "The Inner Light," say.
 
TNG had pretty solid continuity by the standards of its day
That is true to be fair. TNG was a show that I caught here and there when it was originally on and only when the DVDs came out did I get to watch it all the way through.

I was pretty surprised at how much of an ongoing plot they gave to Worf.
 
Amusing how standards change. TNG had pretty solid continuity by the standards of its day, and certainly much more than TOS had. A truly "continuity-light" show would not have done "Family." Although it is a disappointment that it didn't do something similar in the wake of "Chain of Command" or "The Inner Light," say.
Didn't they have to really fight to be able to do "Family" at all? Pushing at that limitation.

They also did a lot of making arcs out of like 1 episode per season, so within a season you could rearrange episodes but as long as Season 4 came after Season 5, then you could refer back to what happened the last time that character/situation came up. Like, Klingon politics, Q, Lwaxana Troi, etc.
 
Didn't they have to really fight to be able to do "Family" at all? Pushing at that limitation.
They wanted to do the episode just as a character drama, but Berman initially pushed for them to include a sci-fi-driven plot.
 
Didn't they have to really fight to be able to do "Family" at all? Pushing at that limitation.

Yes, but they still did it. That's the point. Berman was pushing for conformity to the norms of the era, and the producers insisted on going beyond them, at least that once.


They also did a lot of making arcs out of like 1 episode per season, so within a season you could rearrange episodes but as long as Season 4 came after Season 5, then you could refer back to what happened the last time that character/situation came up. Like, Klingon politics, Q, Lwaxana Troi, etc.

Yes, exactly. A middle ground between the minimal continuity of the '60s and the more arc-driven stuff that came later. It seems "continuity-light" to us today, but for viewers at the time -- particularly viewers of my age who grew up on '70s TV and reruns of '60s TV -- it would've seemed fairly continuity-heavy. It's all relative to what you're used to.
 
Am afraid I gave this one an "average". The three storylines (Picard's / Crusher's / Secret Mining Colony) felt very light. i was expecting more from Ro who was returning to Bajor at a pivotal moment in its history. Madred's arrival didn't seem as significant as was being made out, with Picard mostly taking it in his stride.

And I found the plot detail of bridge officers learning other stations very random. I can understand it being a thing but Data being at the conn added nothing to the story.

I just wish some or all of the storylines were fleshed out a bit more.
 
I got my copy of Pliable Truths from amazon today .I'm glad to find A Copy of it. And that it didn't take up to 4 months to get the book like it took with trying to find a copy of Picard Firewall it kept back ordering.
 
I liked your podcast interview with Dayton Ward I've read the first 12 chapters of this book. It's great to read about 1990s era TNG and Ds9 that takes place before Emmissary.I like the backstory about Miles O'Brien being a war vet of the Cardassian wars and it fills in the blanks of his joining Ds9 to help the Bajorans fix the destruction the Cardassian caused to the station before they left . :bolian:I really liked this book alot.
 
This story feels like the Star Trek version of Babylon 5 movies made toward the end of the series. Particularly In the Beginning and Thridspace. It's a kind of prequel which tells a relatively big story that fills in the gaps between episodes. I enjoyed the crossover elements with DS9. Odo, Garak, and Kira are very much at the logical point just before where they start in the show. Quark... is there. And I think that's a solid choice. Especially since this book gives Crusher, Riker, Picard, the O'Briens, and Ro plenty to do. Overall, very much a TNG story which balances its DS9 prequel elements quite well.
 
Am afraid I gave this one an "average". The three storylines (Picard's / Crusher's / Secret Mining Colony) felt very light. i was expecting more from Ro who was returning to Bajor at a pivotal moment in its history. Madred's arrival didn't seem as significant as was being made out, with Picard mostly taking it in his stride.

And I found the plot detail of bridge officers learning other stations very random. I can understand it being a thing but Data being at the conn added nothing to the story.

I just wish some or all of the storylines were fleshed out a bit more.

I agree with this sentiment. As I continued to read through this book, I couldn't shake the feeling that something was missing. Upon reflection having finished the book, I feel like the book either needed to be longer to further flesh out the three main plot threads or one of those threads needed to be dropped to give the other two more room to breathe.

For example, I felt like Picard was a minor character in this book. Logically, I know he wasn't, but I feel like he was. The stuff surrounding him, including some of his internal struggles, felt superficial. When his being part of the negotiations was first being set up, I really expected this to be hugely difficult for him. Sure, he's. Jean-Luc Picard, so of course I expected he would be able to overcome his struggles, but it actually didn't seem to be much of a struggle for him as I read it. Even more so, when Madred showed up I expected some sort of existential crisis on his part. I think some of the words of the book implied that, but I didn't experience that with him.

I just feel, as I said earlier, like something was missing in this book.
 
I finally read my copy. I didn't think it Ward's best, but it was still pretty solid. I felt Ro was underutilized. Given that it was a Bajorcentric novel, the Enterprises only Bajoran should have been more prominent than she was. I was surprised at the implied death of....a certain character but in light of real world events it seemed fitting and that's all I'm going to say bout that.
 
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