The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    We know Don Adams missed one terrible episode of Get Smart due to "illness," and Robert Reed's hissy fit with Schwartz (one of many) led to him not being in The Brady Bunch's series finale, but I cannot recall any of The Mod Squad's male cast members ever being completely absent from an episode.

    How dare you! ;)

    One of the essential recordings of the "British Invasion" output, and certainly placed the Moodies on the map.

    You mean Denny Laine. Yes, he sort of wandered after leaving the first version of the Moody Blues, and as far as I'm aware, never had much to say after the group's new configuration and sound made them one of the biggest/innovative UK groups. Once he joined Wings, he was not necessarily distinguishing himself (typical of others who have worked with McCartney) but when he performed "Go Now" as part of the Wings tours, he left the audience with one of the most memorable songs from the set.
     
  2. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    I'd give Denny a little more credit for his contribution to Wings.
     
  3. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
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    _______

    55th Anniversary Viewing

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    Branded
    "The Test"
    Originally aired February 7, 1965
    Jason runs into Father Durant (Jason Evers) while being pursued by a group of Indians. Jason uses Durant's wagon for cover while fending them off, but the priest won't fire the rifle that Jason hands him. The two bond some afterward, Jason respecting the priest's principles but not sharing his own reason for being a drifter. Then a party of Comanches comes for Durant, who's been working with them, to explain the incident. Durant makes clear to Jason that he won't fight, but he won't run either. At the Comanche camp, Durant is accused of having contributed to the "ambush" by a warrior named Wild Horse (Jay Silverheels!).

    Jason arrives at the camp carrying a spear of peace, and demonstrates some knowledge of the individual Comanches by their reputations and of their ways. He tries to explain how Durant's unwillingness to fight is an attribute of his greater kind of strength...and then gives them a demonstration of turning the other cheek by slapping the priest around a little! The Comanches allow Jason to fight Wild Horse on Durant's behalf, which starts with a jousting-style contest and ends in an on-foot melee between broken saber and tomahawk. Jason wins and Durant persuades Chief Looking Glass (Joe De Santis) to spare Wild Horse's life. The Chief expresses an interest in having Durant teach the Comanche children his kind of courage at his mission.

    I was a little unconvinced that the Comanches would be so easily won over by a demonstration of Christian values. I'm no expert on tribal culture, but there was an episode of Hell on Wheels in which Bohannon reluctantly participated in an Indian game that was expected to be fought to the death (which he didn't know going in), tried to spare the life of an opponent (who was the chief's son, I think), and almost got burned alive for shaming said opponent.

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    12 O'Clock High
    "The Clash"
    Originally aired February 12, 1965
    https://www.trekbbs.com/threads/the-classic-retro-pop-culture-thread.278375/page-64#post-12176427
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    Gilligan's Island
    "St. Gilligan and the Dragon"
    Originally aired February 13, 1965
    This one's odd continuity-wise...the source of the tensions is that the Howells and the girls apparently don't have their own huts yet. Pretty sure we've seen such huts at this point, though this episode seems to establish that they've all been using the community hut.

    Mr. Howell comes up with a plan to scare the women back by making it appear that there's a wild animal on the island. The result is a rather fake-looking dragon costume with Skipper in front and Gilligan in back, but Ginger spies on them putting it together. As Mr. Howell coaches them in practicing their growls...
    The girls pretend to be frightened and beat the dragon with poles until the duo come out of the costume.

    While the women have experienced some initial difficulty with building their hut, the men find themselves having trouble with tasks like laundry, sewing, and cooking, though they're as determined as the women to prove they can get along without the party of the opposite sex. That night, Skipper has a dream of the women "just acting the way we want them to," which has them serving as his harem. Mr. Howell dreams of the women giving him a massage, manicure, and pedicure. The Professor dreams of himself as an actor with the girls as his screaming fans. Gilligan dreams of himself as a bullfighter with the women giving him gifts and taking turns charging through his cape. The men wake up and go outside to get some air, and Mr. Howell's dependency on pills comes up again. They then try to go entice the women back politely, but find themselves rebuffed.

    The women go outside and see what appears to be another monster, and assume that it's the men in costume again...until they notice that the men are standing nearby, upon which they're genuinely frightened. Gilligan prepares to approach with a pole being wielded as a lance when the Professor determines from a distance that it's a weather balloon that they could use to send a message to civilization...but they're too late to stop Gilligan from charging in and destroying it.

    In the coda, the Skipper determines that the balloon's radio equipment has been smashed into uselessness, but the Professor thinks that they could still repair the balloon and send it up as a signal...only to find that Gilligan has further cut it to pieces to be used as material for clothing and huts.

    _______
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2020
  4. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    :eek: :bolian:

    Sounds like a scene from Airplane!. :rommie:

    Sounds like the nuances of courage may be the overall theme of this show, which should be interesting.

    In the Gilligan's Island tie-in novel Tropical Storm Schwartz by Harlan Ellison, this was explained by showing the huts being blown away in high winds, forcing a temporary return to community living.

    I must be a hermaphrodite. I'm incompetent at all of these things.

    They missed the boat here, no pun intended, by not showing the girls having corresponding dreams.

    Shortly after this, his pill supply ran out completely, which was addressed in the tie-in novel Fear and Loathing on Gilligan's Island by Hunter S Thompson.

    The important thing here being Gilligan's bravery in saving them from the monster-- these are the kinds of things that make this show great.
     
  5. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50th Anniversary Viewing (Part 1)

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    The Ed Sullivan Show
    Season 22, episode 20
    Originally aired February 8, 1970
    As represented in The Best of the Ed Sullivan Show

    I had no way of verifying exactly which date this particular Richard Pryor appearance was from, but this was my best guess from those listed on tv.com. After asserting that the censors wouldn't let him do a routine about church, he instead does a routine about neighborhood basketball and community organization.

    Also in the original episode according to tv.com:
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    Mission: Impossible
    "Phantoms"
    Originally aired February 8, 1970
    Look who's an agent this time:
    MI35.jpg
    Her character is Nora Bennett, who happens to bear a striking resemblance to a deceased old flame of Zorka's named Lisa from 25 years prior.

    As the mission commences, Major Paris gains access to a microfilm room, where he does some doctoring. We see Zara (Jeff Pomerantz), the country's young "Poet of Protest," interrogated by Kull, and suffering a minor attack or seizure because of his heart condition. Our other guest agent, English Broadcasting Service reporter Edmund Moore (Ivor Barry), arrives for an interview with Vorka with Barney as his camera crew. Barney openly obtains the premier's glasses and a mantle clock, ostensibly because they're causing reflections, so he can swap them out during the interview. In his darkened portion of the room, he also replaces a book on the premier's shelf.

    Horn-Rimmed History Writer Jim pays a visit to Vorka for the purpose of gaining patronage and getting his work ripped off. Aided by his infrared-sensitive new glasses, Vorka sees a distorted moving image of Nora as Lisa, projected from the planted book, and after Jim leaves, hears audio from the clock, in which Nora gives him an infodump about his supposed son by her, whom he just learned about from Jim, being none other than Zara. Jim and one of the premier's guards come into the room in response to his cries, and Jim borrows the projection book in order to save it from a subsequent search. While Jim is alone with Vorka, another projection plays, but Jim claims to see and hear nothing.

    Thanks to the doctored microfilm, a disguised Paris is rounded up as the old man who delivered young Zara to an orphanage. He drops hazily remembered details that indicate that Lisa was the boy's mother. He also recalls that the boy had a bad heart. Vorka has Kull bring in Zara. Paris, getting around and switching disguises rather quickly, reports to the team from the prison's guardhouse. The staff car with Zara gets a call from Barney ordering it to help Uniformed Willy, who's car has fake broken down. Willy commandeers Zara's car at gunpoint.

    In the IMF's warehouse digs, Zara watches Paris disguise himself as Zara. Fake Zara is brought to the premier's office by Willy. Alone with the premier, Fake Zara insists that Vorka's old rival, Sarni, was his father, and accuses Vorka of being responsible for his mother's death. This provokes Vorka to slap FZ, who falls to the floor and feigns a heart attack. Vorka then sees a projection of Zara's spirit rising from his body (the real Zara, being shot live in the warehouse), and he joins his fake mother to point accusingly at Vorka. Kull, Bartzin, Jim, and others run in because of Vorka's loud pleas, and find him rambling about the ghosts pointing at him that nobody else sees. Bartzin has the premier taken away for a long rest, and then relieves Kull of duty. Jim covertly retrieves the book on his way out. Mission: Accomplished.

    We get another reuse of a recognizable set piece--the hallway with the gated entrance to the premier's office area was the entrance to the crown jewels vault in "The Falcon".

    _______

    Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In
    Season 3, episode 21
    Originally aired February 9, 1970

    Henry: You know, Mr. Backus, I've always looked up to you as an actor.
    Jim: Because you admire my versatility?
    Henry: No, because I'm shorter than you are.​

    Backus's contributions include a recurring gag of him voicing a Mr. Magoo-style cartoon Uncle Sam.

    The cocktail party has a gag about John Lennon returning his MBE.

    The Russian version of Laugh-In:


    Dick does a Discovery of the Week for the first time in a long time. I couldn't find a clip, but it was pretty lame.

    Ernestine calls William F. Buckley:

    Next segment here.

    Potpourri...or Lucinda if you prefer.

    Tyrone shares his plan to propose to Gladys:

    Of course, it doesn't go so well.

    New Talent for the Future: Miss Agatha Grunt. I think that was Dick's discovery who pops up in the middle.

    Do the Farkel:

    Jim Backus is at the tail end of that one.

    An ending featuring the Farkels, Wolfgang, and Carl Reiner:


    _______

    TGs4e20.jpg
    "Stocks and the Single Girl"
    Originally aired February 12, 1970
    Ann is dining at the Italian restaurant at the same time as the stockbroker, Arnold Lindsey (Harry Townes), who accidentally causes a mishap with a popped cork that chains in slow motion through multiple parties into Ann having wine spilled all over her by a waiter. Lindsey gives her a card to charge the dry cleaning to him. Donald knows him by reputation and tells Ann. He then finds the notes on the back of the card and upon seeing the word "buy" jumps to the conclusion that the accompanying shorthand list is for stocks. Ann tries calling him and the secretary confirms that it's an important list and that Lindsey needs it before the market closes.

    Donald consults with NewsView's financial editor and brings Mr. Marie in on the plan. The trio try to find which stocks correspond to the shorthand items. Ann makes their investments at Lindsey's firm, he comes out to see her, and she tries to be coy about the tips he gave her, with lots of winking. Eventually he finds out what she did and sets her straight about the nature of the list...but he indicates that her stocks happen to be doing pretty well.

    In the coda, Lew and Donald are pleased with the performance of their investments, and Ann treats them to a meal consisting of the items on Lindsey's list.

    "Oh, Donald" count: 3
    "Oh, Daddy" count: 1

    _______

    Now that you mention it... :lol: Also kinda reminded me of Spock slapping around Not Nancy Crater.

    Yeah...I was going to say something in the next review (having watched the episode yesterday) about how they seem to be having Jason getting involved with people whose situations mirror his own in some way...whether it's dealing with being perceived as a coward, being haunted by their reputation from a past life, or something else. It's turning out to be a pretty good little show so far.

    Surely you can't be serious!

    Maybe, but that could've dragged. And the sequence was kind of subversive, as the men's dreams weren't very flattering to them.

    You're not serious...so I guess I can call you Shirley.

    But even when his heart is in the right place and he's trying to do the right thing, he always manages to screw things up somehow. Sort of like Peter Parker played for comedy instead of angst.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2020
  6. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50th Anniversary Viewing (Part 2)

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    Ironside
    "Return to Fiji"
    Originally aired February 12, 1970
    Holy Old War Buddies--The Chief served with Alan Napier at Guadalcanal! Napier's character, Walter Branford, is abducted at gunpoint right after making plans via phone for Ironside to visit him, so he's not at the airport to pick the Chief up. When Ironside gets to Branford's home, the staff tells him that Branford went to America to see him...a story that his niece Marcia (Anne Collings) supports on the phone. The Chief finds this especially fishy when he discovers that Walter left his heart medication behind. The Chief sends for Mark and Ed to fly out, but when they get there they're faced with a similar situation--the hotel doesn't have reservations for them, nor do they show a Robert Ironside staying there. When they get to Stately Branford Manor, the staff indicates that Marcia was involved in both disappearances.

    We find that Ironside has allowed himself to be abducted by some British types led by a Mr. Barnesworth (Larry D. Mann), and including one Dr. Stauffer (Bernard Fox). They take the Chief to the village hut where they're keeping Walter. The doctor gives Ironside something to put him under, but he plays possum upon recovering and drops a clue along the way. We further learn that Walter is being held as a means to persuade Marcia, whose job for the metallurgy office gives her the authority to approve metallurgical shipments.

    Marcia changes her story for Ed and Mark, leading them to an island. Their journey there makes use of actual location shooting--conspicuously silent as usual, until they cut to an outdoor set. A couple of men try to abduct them at gunpoint, but they're saved by the Fiji police force (which calls itself the CID here, though I couldn't find what it stood for and didn't catch it if it was in the episode), whom Ed and Mark got in touch with prior to departure. The baddies were meant to keep them out of the way.

    While Marcia's signing the papers, the doctor is given an order to kill Ironside, which makes him want out of the scheme. Ed, Mark, and the CID show up at the village where the Chief and Branford are being held, and find Ironside, who despite being drugged manages a dramatic rolling off his cot and crawling into his wheelchair. Also despite his condition, he wants in on the climax...
    Despite attempts by the baddies to make it look like they plan to take the gold to Australia by air, the Chief and the CID inspector (Alan Caillou) deduce that the actual plan is Red China by boat, and intercept the baddies by helicopter before they manage to launch. But it's not over, as back at Branford Manor, Ironside outs the butler, Anthony (Ken Renard), as an inside man in the scheme.

    In the coda, Ironside puts Ed and Mark back to work despite their expectation that they'd be able to get on with their own planned vacations.

    I was a little disappointed that they didn't give Napier much more to do than lie on a cot.

    _______

    Get Smart
    "How Green Was My Valet"
    Originally aired February 13, 1970
    It's described as an extremely potent/concentrated fuel, with the one quart in existence being enough to send a rocket to the Moon and back 25 times. Max finds it in a thermos in the lab of the professor who invented it, and initially assumes that it's sour cherry soda. The valet of the Ambassador (Harris) steals it for him, but is killed for knowing too much; and the valet's wife, the maid, is sent back to the home country. Hence the hiring of Max and 99.

    Max's ineptness makes the Ambassador suspicious. He dictates his safe combination to his secretary, Zachary (Julie Bennett; and see what they did there?), while Max is in earshot in order to expose him. But Max is just as inept at safe cracking, so by the time the Ambassador comes back into the room with gun drawn, he's away from the safe, trying to check the glass on which he wrote the combination...which he has to wipe off while pretending to clean it.

    Max discovers that the Ambassador is wearing a key to the wine cellar around his neck and improvises a plan to get it off of him by getting him extremely drunk on wine. Max and 99 inspect the cellar and are confronted by the Ambassador--who seems to have sobered up quickly--at gunpoint. Max knocks him out again with the bottle containing the rocket fuel, but 99 has managed to save a sample of the fuel in a glass.

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    The Brady Bunch
    "Brace Yourself"
    Originally aired February 13, 1970
    The day she gets her braces, Marcia doesn't want to come down for dinner, and eating alone later finds that they're ruining the taste of food. Carol tells Marcia that anyone who's a real friend or loves her won't be turned off by her new appearance. Meanwhile, Mike tries to talk the other kids into ignoring her braces. Cindy makes too obvious an effort not to even look at Marcia in the bathroom, and when confronted, blurts out an insensitive question. Alice asserting that Marcia will be gorgeous when the braces come off and then telling Marcia that she wore braces herself doesn't reassure her. Bobby makes his own blunder while trying to be polite.

    Mike convinces Marcia to go downstairs and see the visiting Alan, which is when he gives the story about going on a trip. Greg tries to use helping his friend Joey to study as leverage to make him date Marcia; while Alice sizes up and bribes Eddie while he's delivering groceries. Eddie and Joey come over to see Marcia at the same time as Mike and Carol's arranged date, the awkwardly shy Harold. Marcia figures out that they've all been bribed.

    After that incident, Alan comes over, confesses to the trip being a story, and asks Marcia to the dance. She's initially skeptical that he's been bribed as well, but he compliments her looks with convincing sincerity. When he comes to pick her up, he reveals his own set of braces.

    I'm wondering if they'll be consistent with showing Marcia in braces in subsequent episodes; and if so, were they actually Maureen McCormick's? They did try to sell them as a short-term thing, so I wouldn't be surprised if they're not seen again.

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    Hogan's Heroes
    "One Army at a Time"
    Originally aired February 13, 1970
    The prisoners are attempting to blow a bridge when a patrol comes upon Carter carrying the device and, staying in character, he claims to have found it. The prisoners assume he was captured, but the Germans treat him as a hero and are impressed by what Newkirk put in his false papers. Carter slips back into camp in the middle of a late-night roll call, during which Hochstetter announces that these will be a nightly routine while they try to find the saboteur. Hogan and the others have to persuade Carter to resume his German role to go back for the dynamite.

    Meanwhile, Hogan attempts to talk Klink into discontinuing the roll calls.

    Klink: Hogan, you don't understand the Gestapo, do you?
    Hogan: No, I don't.
    Klink: Neither do I. I just do what they demand.​

    A fake radio order from Kinch recalls Hochstetter, after which Hogan uses reverse psychology to get Klink to discontinue the roll calls.

    Despite his initial reluctance, Carter starts to embrace his role, but is concerned that his unit may soon be shipped out to the Russian front. The others go out in uniform and rendezvous with Carter, who's smuggled the dynamite out in a tank. They replace the guards at the bridge and, because Carter couldn't find the detonator, use the tank's gun to set off the explosives.

    DIS!Missed!

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    Adam-12
    "Log 24: A Rare Occasion"
    Originally aired February 14, 1970
    In the opening, Reed and Malloy are bringing in an ex-con for purse snatching. Frankie (Raymond Mayo) is very familiar with the station and its personnel, such that he's looking forward to chow time at 6. Inside the station, Reed and Malloy listen via Mac's office radio to a pursuit in progress, which results in a squad car crashing and two officers in critical condition. Malloy suggests calling off the barbecue planned for the next day, but Reed says that Jean's really been looking forward to it.

    At the Reed home the next day, Jean introduces Pete to a single friend, Ruth Bannister (Carla Borelli), who's a computer programmer. The barbecue is just the four of them, so apparently setting up Malloy was the plan. Jean is upset when the men discuss the hospitalized officers. Jim takes Pete into the garage to show him a junker of a pickup truck that he's been reconditioning with the help of a neighbor boy named Tim Richmond. While there, Tim's mother (Cathleen Cordell) comes over looking for her son. Back outside, Little Jim is brought out and Jim and Jean ask Pete to be his godfather. After Pete accepts, Tim (Cassidy) comes calling, obviously high and rambling about somebody coming to get him.

    They bring Tim inside and Jim calls Mr. Richmond (Ross Elliott) to have him come over. Tim initially denies having popped pills to Pete, but comes clean for his father. He tells them about a man named Skat who was passing out pills at a party he was attending. Jean comes in and says that she saw someone in the garage. Jim and Pete go out to investigate and are attacked by a scruffy-looking character with a wrench (Dan Scott). They make an out-of-uniform arrest, and inside Tim identifies the man as Skat and explains that the drug pusher had threatened to deal with him after he learned that Tim was friends with a cop.

    In the coda, the couples are back inside the Reed home, the party having been a bust. Pete tells Ruth that catching Skat was a big win as some detectives had been trying to learn the identity of a suspect who'd been dealing drugs to high school kids. Across the room, Jean laments to her husband about how Pete and Ruth aren't hitting it off like she'd hoped.

    Jim: You can't stand a happy bachelor, can you?
    Jean: No, they infuriate me!​

    Jim and Pete then get called in for unscheduled duty, and Jim learns that one of the officers involved in the chase accident has died. Jean asks Ruth to stay and watch Little Jim so Jim Sr. can take her to the hospital to be there for Officer Chavez's wife.

    This is the last of Mikki Jamison's three appearances as Jean Reed.

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    Last edited: Feb 19, 2020
  7. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I imagine the suits at Capitol thought the pop music fans in America were somehow very different from British fans and that is the reason they thought they had to micro manage the song lists, album titles, album covers, etc. The British Beatle albums were nearly all better than the American releases. Still irritates me because I don’t think there was much difference at all between the two fandoms.
    With both No Reply and I’ll Be Back posted, and listening to them one after another, I finally realize why I find the two songs sound like “cousins;” the two songs have nearly the same instrumental and vocal arrangements. Both feature the same mid tempo groove, John’s subdued double tracked lead vocals, with Paul jumping in on harmonies. I think they also have a similar tone as well. I also checked the songs’ chords to see if they structurally similar or even the same, but they aren’t.

    Still, my favorite of the two remains I’ll Be Back. Nicer melody.
    “Loser,” does have a vaguely Dylanesque sound but I think Hide Your Love Away sounds more like a Dylan song. But that being said, I love Loser. Great melody and interesting lyrics.

    I’v always thought the “companion” song to Loser was You’re Gonna Lose That Girl, probably for reasons similar to my feelings about the two I’ll Be Back and No Reply.
    Not one of my favorite Beatles songs from this era.
    They always played the hell out of Chuck Berry songs. John’s vocals are inspired and remind me a bit of how he sounded on Twist and Shout. John did love that old fashioned echoey sound.
    Love this song. Surprised to hear that it was one of Paul’s childhood compositions. Shows his songwriting talent appeared early in his life.
    I never liked Mr. Moonlight. It was a great vocal by John, but the song itself never appealed to me.
    Honey Don’t was another of the Rngo country/rockabilly covers that I really liked.
     
  8. scotpens

    scotpens Professional Geek Premium Member

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    Mr. Magoo was also pre-Gilligan's Island. Backus had been voicing the animated nearsighted millionaire since 1949.
     
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  9. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Pretty much that, plus the American way was to collect previously released singles on albums, whereas in the UK they generally avoided such double-dipping. That's why we have the Past Masters volumes in the digital era...mostly singles and B-sides that weren't released on the UK albums.

    Not quite hearing it myself, but there's a meta connection between the two songs: one was the closing song of one album, the other the opening song of the next. When I was listening the hell out of cassettes I'd made of my UK versions of the Beatles albums, the songs were a cassette flip away.

    Interesting pairing. Thematically, I think "Loser" groups up well with the songs surrounding it here. "You're Gonna Lose That Girl" has a different vibe to it...that's John as the aggressor rather than the wounded.
     
  10. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    I'm surprised the censors didn't censor talking about what the censors censored. :rommie:

    The Commies are planning Hippie Genocide! :mad:

    And the times they are a-changin.'

    "This appetizer from that IPO is especially tasty. What was it called? Oh, right. Soylent Green."

    Don't call me-- aw, you beat me to it.

    Just don't call me late for dinner.

    Gilligan just can't win-- which I suppose is also part of why people identify with him.

    Now Ironside is fifteen years older than he should be. His age has fluctuated by about thirty years over the course of the season. :rommie:

    Criminal Investigations Department.

    Sweet. :bolian:

    He's gruff and he means it.

    Nice little tropical adventure for Ironside, though.

    Alfred probably appreciated it. :rommie:

    Yeah, but how big is the rocket?

    Oh, the pain!

    Few are the boys who would reject Maureen McCormick for having braces. :rommie:

    Newkirk must have been so jealous. :rommie:

    Leave the poor guy alone!

    Haha. :D

    She left acting to become a professional matchmaker.
     
  11. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    55th Anniversary Cinematic Special

    T.A.M.I. Show
    Directed by Steve Binder
    Starring The Beach Boys, The Barbarians, Chuck Berry, The Blossoms, James Brown and The Flames, Marvin Gaye, Gerry and The Pacemakers, Lesley Gore, Jan and Dean, Billy J. Kramer and The Dakotas, Smokey Robinson and The Miracles, The Supremes, and The Rolling Stones
    Released December 29, 1964

    This is a moment in '60s music history that I'd long heard about but never seen in its entirety--and look, it's all there on YouTube! The opening credits feature an occasion-specific song by hosts Jan and Dean, "(Here They Come) from All Over the World," played while the duo ride various recreational vehicles and the various groups and artists travel to the show. (Note the recurring musical nod when the Beach Boys are mentioned; and that the Stones are misidentified as being from Liverpool!)

    Getting on with the show (4:44)...
    Chuck opens with "Johnny B. Goode" followed by "Maybellene," which segues into Gerry and the Pacemakers doing their own rendition of the same song. The Pacemakers continue their set with "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying" (with a little too much Vaseline on the lens), followed by "It's Gonna Be Alright," which had already been a #24 in the UK in 1964, but will be charting in the US in April 1965. The spotlight then alternates between artists, turning to Chuck again for "Sweet Little Sixteen"; then Gerry and the Pacemakers with their breakout UK #1, "How Do You Do It?" (the song that the Beatles couldn't be seen with); Chuck on "Nadine"; and the Pacemakers on "I Like It". Overall, this segment was a good showcase of the music that started it all and the newest wave of artists to be influenced by it.

    Smokey & the gang start their set (18:35) with "That's What Love Is Made Of," a recent single that charted in September '64, reaching #35 US, #9 R&B. They move on to a couple of better-known Top 10 hits, "You've Really Got a Hold on Me" and "Mickey's Monkey". There's a liberal amount of improv/variation in these renditions of the songs, and lots of dancing by the group members.

    Marvin starts (29:28) with his 1962 R&B chart breakout single, "Stubborn Kind of Fellow" (#46 US, #8 R&B), following with 1963 hits "Pride and Joy" (for which he gets a backdrop to block out the dancers and give him the sole spotlight), "Can I Get a Witness," and "Hitch Hike".

    At 36:09 there's a brief reprise of the title theme as a sort of act divider before proceeding to the next set...
    Lesley gives us a meaty set consisting mostly of well-known singles: "Maybe I Know," "You Don't Own Me," "You Didn't Look Around" (not sure where this is from...doesn't appear to have been a single, B-side, or album track), "Hey Now" (a then-current single that only got to #76 US), and--with other acts joining her on stage as if it were the finale--"It's My Party" and "Judy's Turn to Cry".

    Lesley hands her mic to Dean (47:10) and our hosts do their own little set, consisting of "The Little Old Lady from Pasadena" and "Sidewalk Surfin'"--the latter featuring a brief bit of Dean skateboarding onstage.

    I read that this hits-heavy set (51:55) wasn't included in the original theatrical release due to rights issues. It consists of "Surfin' U.S.A.," "I Get Around," "Surfer Girl," and "Dance, Dance, Dance".

    Billy's set (1:00:55) consists of every charter he'd had in the US at this point, and all of his Top 40s ever: "Little Children," "Bad to Me," "I'll Keep You Satisfied," and "From a Window". Three of them being Lennon/McCartney numbers lends the show some Fab presence.

    Jan is accompanied for that intro (1:07:15) by Jack Nitzsche, who was Phil Spector's right-hand man. Diana & the ladies perform "When the Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes," "Run, Run, Run" (a less successful single--#93 US, #22 R&B--that fell between "Lovelight" and "Where Did Our Love Go"), "Baby Love," and "Where Did Our Love Go".

    This is the only unfamiliar group in the bunch (1:14:35).
    Their only number shown here, "Hey Little Bird," sounds pretty good; it strikes me as being somewhat cutting edge for American bands in that particular moment.

    And now we come to the most-referenced aspect of the show, the final two acts. With some slapstick involving Dean dressed as a firefighter (1:17:10)...
    The Godfather of Soul performs 1964's "Out of Sight," 1963's "Prisoner of Love," and 1956's "Please, Please, Please"--his first R&B hit (#5), which ranks at #142 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. Watching this one, I can see what all the fuss has been about. Brown puts on quite a show, with the dropping to his knees and his guys trying to walk him offstage in his cape--or is it a boxing robe? Whatever it is, he keeps throwing it off and dramatically working his way back to the mic. His final number, 1962's "Night Train," serves as a dance showcase for Brown and his background dancers. The man definitely had some moves.

    The idea was to save the Stones for last to give them a prominent spotlight (1:35:25), but Keith Richards has been quoted as saying that following James Brown was the biggest mistake they ever made in the group's career. Mick's trying to show off his own moves in the set, but yeah, it all looks watered down compared to Brown's show. The set includes "Around and Around," "Off the Hook" (an album track not yet released in the States), "Time Is on My Side," "It's All Over Now," and "I'm Alright" (a Bo Diddley song that will be included on their first live album). I'm not sure where their final number, "Let's Get Together" (1:50:00), is from, but it serves as the big finale, with all of the other acts and the dancers joining them onstage.

    _______

    Good way to milk some humor from what he wasn't allowed to joke about.

    Yeah, his nickname made me think of Dylan, too.

    No, they got that just right this time. Raymond Burr would have been a studly young man of 25 in 1942. Napier was 14 years older, but he could've been a British officer or something.

    I should've looked harder...

    Seemed kind of wasted on the moment it was used in, though. Ed and Mark were searching hut to hut, so they would've found him anyway.

    They missed a golden opportunity to write in a situation that involved Branford having to disguise himself as the Chief, and somehow managing to fool everybody even though he's obviously thinner and older.

    "Silence, you bubble-headed booby!"
    (Site I found says he used that alliterative insult nine times!)
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2020
  12. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Location:
    RJDiogenes of Boston
    I'm looking-- because I never heard of it before. Looks like pure 60s fun, though.

    Haha. :rommie: How is it that Mick did not send the Hell's Angels after Jan and Dean? :rommie:

    To me, too, oddly enough (although it turns out I know one of their songs). I'm also unfamiliar with the Caves of Cape Cod. Sounds Lovecraftian somehow.

    True enough.

    Would have been funny if he commented on that. Gruffly. :rommie:

    "He has a cold."

    Per episode, or all together? :rommie:
     
  13. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    Somewhere in Connecticut
    55 Years Ago This Week




    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Give Him a Great Big Kiss," The Shangri-Las (9 weeks)
    • "How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved by You)," Marvin Gaye (14 weeks)
    • "Keep Searchin' (We'll Follow the Sun)," Del Shannon (14 weeks)
    • "Look of Love," Lesley Gore (9 weeks)
    • "That's How Strong My Love Is," Otis Redding (4 weeks)

    Recent and new on the chart:

    "Ask the Lonely," Four Tops

    (Feb. 6; #24 US; #9 R&B)

    4 by the Beatles [EP], The Beatles
    (#68 US)

    "Do the Clam," Elvis Presley

    (#21 US; #19 UK)

    "Do You Wanna Dance?," The Beach Boys

    (#12 US)

    "Nowhere to Run," Martha & The Vandellas

    (#8 US; #5 R&B; #26 UK; #358 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • Branded, "The Bounty"
    • 12 O'Clock High, "The Ticket"
    • Gilligan's Island, "Diamonds Are an Ape's Best Friend"

    _______

    It's worth a view...all that period talent in one show...a snapshot of that moment in pop music history.

    Typo fixed, that should have been "coves".
     
  14. scotpens

    scotpens Professional Geek Premium Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2009
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    That sounds familiar, somehow. :vulcan:

    The original title for Help! was Eight Arms to Hold You.
     
  15. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    Somewhere in Connecticut
    One for every day of the week! It possibly wasn't even going by that name yet.

    https://www.beatlesbible.com/features/working-titles/
     
  16. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Location:
    RJDiogenes of Boston
    Not their most memorable work.

    The GIANT clam!

    Not their most memorable work, either, but it sure captures the feel of that era.

    Nice one. Snappy.

    I downloaded it. I wish it was higher resolution, but I'll watch it when I get the chance.

    Hah. Someday the Caves of Cape Cod will show up in one of my stories because of that typo. :rommie:
     
  17. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    Somewhere in Connecticut
    But not bad either...it's got that distinctive Four Tops sound.

    :lol: Ah, good times.

    Seriously, I have a fairly high tolerance for cheesy movie-era Elvis, but I listen to something like this and have to ask, "Was he even still trying at this point?"

    I should note that The Beach Boys Today! is on the RS albums list, and so should be getting a spotlight here eventually.

    In my head, I pair this one thematically with "Shotgun".

    Ooh, can I be in the acknowledgments?
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2020
  18. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    Somewhere in Connecticut
    50 Years Ago This Week

    This would be the actual broadcast date of his only appearance, as opposed to the second appearance that Lewisohn seemed to think it was. What he thought was the first was presumably the taping date. Even The Beatles Bible, which is sometimes handy for verifying inaccuracies in Lewisohn's book, is misleading on this point.


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Don't Cry Daddy" / "Rubberneckin'", Elvis Presley (13 weeks)
    • "Jingle Jangle," The Archies (13 weeks)
    • "She Came in Through the Bathroom Window," Joe Cocker (12 weeks)
    • "Someday We'll Be Together," Diana Ross & The Supremes (16 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Celebrate," Three Dog Night

    (#15 US)

    "Instant Karma (We All Shine On)," John Ono Lennon

    (#3 US; #5 UK)

    "Spirit in the Sky," Norman Greenbaum

    (#3 US; #1 UK; #333 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • Mission: Impossible, "Lover's Knot"
    • Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, Season 3, episode 23, featuring Ringo!
    • That Girl, "The Reunion"
    • Ironside, "One Hour to Kill"
    • Get Smart, "Smartacus"
    • The Brady Bunch, "The Possible Dream"
    • Hogan's Heroes, "Six Lessons from Madame LaGrange"
    • Adam-12, "Log 124: Airport"
    _______
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2020
  19. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Location:
    So. Cal.
    As I think I’v probably mentioned in this thread before, I did see the T.A.M.I. Show in it’s original release in a local theatre. In watching the video I realize that there is a lot I’v forgotten about it.

    The Jan and Dean opening did bring back some great memories. I don’t recall finding this array of artists on the same bill to have been that unusual back then. What was really important was getting to see them. Back then, unless they appeared on one of the variety shows, you had to go to a concert to see them.
    Kinda weird seeing Chuck on the same bill with The Beach Boys, who constantly ripped off his riffs and general style in their early recordings.

    If I recall correctly, Nadine was a pretty recent hit for Chuck but it almost never gets mentioned as one of Chuck’s classics. Having him trade off songs with Gerry and the Pacemakers was as random as it gets. But at the time, I didn’t think anything of it. BTW, Don’t Let the Sun Catch You Crying remains one of the great ballads of the 60’s.
    I
    I didn’t recall Smokey being so horse in this show. He and the Miracles were their usually stylish selves.
    I was never a big Marvin fan. But he sounded pretty good hear.
    For someone living such an unorthodox lifestyle, for the 60’s anyway, Leslie was as conservative as it gets on stage.
    I had zero respect for Jan and Dean as artists. To me, they were as throw away as it got in the 60’s.
    I don’t recall The Beach Boys not being there. For such a great band, The Beach Boys were terrible on stage. About the only band member with any charisma or stage presence was Dennis (the drummer). The rest of them were just plain corny.
    And speaking of corny...

    It is a good thing this guy had those catchy Lennon-McCartney songs because no way would he have made it left to his own devices.
    When he first appears on the video, I thought Nitzsche was Spector. The Beatles haircut and wrap around shades were Phil’s uniform back then.
    The ”Florence Ballard” Supremes. :) Diana sounded great here.

    James’ performance is really the only act that I have a clear recollection of after all these years. It was a performance for the ages. In the movie, Get on Up, James is said to have been pissed that he wasn’t closing this show. In his mind, he was a bigger and more exciting act than the anyone else on the bill, and I think it’s hard to argue either point. At the time, James had had more crossover success than the Stones, and it was a “crossover” audience.

    In my local theater, when James finished his set, I’d say a good 3/4 of the audience, thinking the show must be over, or uninterested in the Stones, got up and streamed out of the theater while the Stones were plugging in their guitars.

    BTW, the cape routine in James’s act was straight out of the black church. The pastor would get so caught up with the spirit, he’d get all sweaty. The deacons would then come out and put a robe over him and try to get him to stop. He’d start to walk off, just like James, but then suddenly throw off the robe and the Holy Ghost would grip him anew. :lol:
    As I’v said before, props to the Stones for having the guts to follow one of the greatest performers of the rock era. They were pretty good as well.
     
  20. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    Somewhere in Connecticut
    I can't recall that you have, and our craptacular search function won't let me verify.

    Image!



    I had to look up who he was.

    Now that doesn't surprise me...

    Did not know that, and that's really something! :lol:

    This came up a few years back in the MeTV thread when I was doing news/music posts in sync with our reviews of The Incredible Hulk (which kinda started this whole monster)...the artist then known as John Cougar spoofed on Brown's stage routine at the end of this video:
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2020