The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    But the run-out groove is kind of a distinct thing, as it's the part that didn't usually contain anything that, in old record players without automatic changers, the needle would stay in indefinitely if you left the turntable on after the record was done. That's why the Beatles put something in there for Sgt. Pepper (which was omitted from US pressings of the album). It's been included in the digital age as several-second thing that fades out, but in its original format it would keep playing in a continuous loop until you picked up the needle.

    Or an alternate-universe counterpart. We have a Robert Bruce Banner, a David Bruce Banner...why not Harold Bruce Banner?

    Ah, so there are recurring 2's....We are supposed to be taking these as distinct characters in-setting, right? As I recall, they made a point of switching 2's in the middle of the first episode.

    _______

    50 Years Ago This Week

    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "San Franciscan Nights," Eric Burdon & The Animals
    • "There Is a Mountain," Donovan
    • "The Ballad of You & Me & Pooneil," Jefferson Airplane

    Entering the chart:

    "Kentucky Woman," Neil Diamond

    (#22 US)

    "Lazy Day," Spanky & Our Gang

    (#14 US; #24 AC)

    "(Loneliness Made Me Realize) It's You That I Need," The Temptations

    (#14 US; #3 R&B)

    "I Can See for Miles," The Who

    Audio-only for those who might find the video above disorienting and just wanna crank it up:

    (#9 US; #10 UK; #258 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • Mission: Impossible, "The Slave: Part I"
    • The Man from U.N.C.L.E., "The Prince of Darkness Affair: Part II"
    • The Rat Patrol, "The Love Thine Enemy Raid"
    • Batman, "A Horse of Another Color"
    • Ironside, "The Taker"
    • That Girl, "Absence Makes the Heart Grow Nervous"
    • Dark Shadows, episodes 336-340 (conclusion of the Decades block of episodes; not currently available for viewing)
    • Tarzan, "The Blue Stone of Heaven: Part II"
    • Star Trek, "The Apple"
    • The Prisoner, "A. B. and C."
    • The Avengers, "The £50,000 Breakfast"
    • Get Smart, "The Spirit Is Willing"
    _______
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2017
  2. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Yeah, I know that, but calling it a separate groove is just semantics. Physically, it's the innermost few loops of a single continuous spiral groove. It has to be continuous or the needle couldn't follow it.


    There are only two recurring Twos, McKern and Colin Gordon. The rest are one-shots. The implicit idea is that they all get sacked for failing to break Number Six, but it could also just be another facet of the Village's mind games, constantly keeping Six off guard and never knowing what or whom to expect.
     
  3. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Going by this episode and a bit I saw of the beginning of the next, it seems that the opening sequence confuses things by having audio of each week's Number 2 introducing himself as if it's the first time for 6. I take it that's just supposed to be symbolic.
     
  4. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    His favorite wartime memory. :rommie:

    Or do a month-long binge. That is a colossal amount of episodes.

    They shouldn't keep all their Easter eggs in one basket.

    I hope he never gets it from an organ grinder. That could be messy.

    I wonder if these records have a B-Side (or a third side, which is also a thing), for the times when Jim chooses not to accept the mission. "So that one doesn't interest you, eh, Jim? Well, how about you just go pick up this week's intelligence packet from our man in Andorra, you sissy."

    A pre-Lib holdover way of balancing the scales. The sexes are such a mystery to each other!

    Another pre-Lib holdover. :rommie: But why does Donald need two apartment sitters at the same time?

    Not exactly hot on Banner's heels in this universe.

    Me, too. :(

    Maybe it's his own people. Maybe it's the enemy. Maybe it's the Third Spy Network. Or maybe there are no sides, and the conflict is just a fiction to keep the population distracted from those who are really in power.

    He's a clever guy. Wait till you see the episode where he drinks a poisoned drink. :rommie:

    Theoretically, but not reliably or effectively. Luckily, Steed doesn't just have a license to kill-- he has an artistic license.

    Not a big fan of Michael Jackson.

    Boring early 80s.

    Boring early 80s.

    However, I love this one (Ray Charles and Chaka Khan!). It's a rare late 80s gem, but, notably, a cover of a song from the mid-70s.

    Not his greatest, but I like Neil Diamond.

    Yeah! Happy 60s!

    Not their best, but okay.

    The Who. 'nuff said. :mallory:
     
  5. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Oops! As Xfinity didn't actually type that here, mea culpa. I suspect that they must have phrased it "Eastern Berliners" for that -er to get in there. Fixed for posterity.

    Maybe that's why Briggs quit.

    He doesn't, which you'd know if you watched the episode! :p Actually, that description is misleading...he lets Ann stay there while he's out of town because her apartment is being exterminated for termites. Harry drops into town on an open invitation from Donald to come stay at his place anytime, and they miss each other's calls.

    But you haven't even seen the giant clam! :lol:

    Third Spy Network? If this were an American show, I'd say that perhaps the next episode's title is a clue....

    Can't really disagree here.

    Now that's a surprise. I'll have to give it another listen, but I was prepared to dismiss if for its very late-80s dance pop production.

    It's interesting how relatively low his songs from this era that became oldies radio staples originally charted.

    With this and "The Rain, the Park & Other Things" on the charts at the same time, sunshine pop is in full bloom.

    Not quite 'nuff. This was their most successful single in the US, their only one to break the Top 10. And as such, I have to imagine that this is what finally really put them on the map in America.

    Whenever this one comes on the radio, whatever volume I'm already at, I always have to turn it up a few notches.

    So, settle a bet that I never made...better than "(The Lights Went Out in) Massachusetts"?
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2017
  6. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    It's exposition. It's the bit that fills in the viewer on the series premise, since it's kind of an atypical idea requiring explanation for a new viewer or a refresher for an occasional viewer. And setting up who this week's Number Two will be is part of that exposition.

    Besides, the whole point of the Village is to be confusing and disorienting, to leave its inmates uncertain of what's real, because that's a key part of breaking and brainwashing people. And the show is meant to be just as disorienting to the viewer. The more you ask for clear answers about what's real and what's true, the less clarity you will find. As Number Two says in the opening call-and-response, "That would be telling."


    The way I interpret the original intent behind M:I is that the IMF is supposed to be an unofficial, off-books team of outside contractors, running deniable missions to deal with problems too sensitive or dangerous for the government to have any official involvement in. That's why most of the team consists of civilian experts rather than full-time agents. Implicit in this is that all the missions are on a volunteer basis. Since they're non-official agents, the government will be unable to vouch for them if they're caught, and they'll just be hung out to dry as rogue criminals or terrorists. And so they can't be ordered to take that risk; it just wouldn't be right. It has to be their choice whether or not to accept the mission.

    I think the revival series and especially the movies got this wrong by portraying the IMF more as an official part of the government bureaucracy. Particularly silly are the bits where we see computer files of disavowed agents. That's a contradiction in terms -- disavowal means that the government doesn't even acknowledge that they were agents, so keeping detailed records about their agenthood is rather counterproductive.

    Of course, the original series abandoned the intent behind the standard message-drop openings in its later seasons, reducing them to a meaningless ritual. In the last two seasons, and on multiple occasions in earlier seasons, the IMF was basically a crime-busting team working closely with legitimate authorities -- so why in the world was it necessary to deliver their assignments by secret message drops with self-destructing tapes?
     
  7. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    We have Dark Shadows! But they're doing something odd in order to cover the six episodes in the Decades block that last year's Binge fell short of. They're starting back at exactly the point that they'd need to (episode 257, from June 20, in the middle of the Jason/Buzz crap) that will result in this year's Binge finishing the block of episodes at 340. So I will be able watch those last six in the block, but they won't be getting back to the beginning of the block and the three (I think) that I didn't have available to watch this year.

    At this point, all evidence is that all they have and intend to have is that six-month block.

    So anyway--Dark Shadows Binge, Oct. 28-30, episodes 257-340.
     
  8. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    I assumed you copied and pasted. It's still funny. :rommie:

    :D

    Ah, the old my-apartment-is-infested-with-vermin-can-I-stay-at-your-place trick.

    I saw the one on Batman (and various other places). And I just love the very idea of the giant clam.

    Best coincidence this week. :bolian:

    Well, it's not profound or anything, but it's catchy and it's Ray Charles and Chaka Khan and it's a nice sentiment. And it makes me laugh because when it first came out my youngest Brother asked, "What's Master Charge?" :rommie:

    People seem embarrassed to like him. I remember there was once an article in Rolling Stone that said something like "It's time for us all to admit that we like Neil Diamond." :rommie:

    Now that's amazing.

    Is "I Can See For Miles" better than "Massachusetts?" Technically, I'd have to say yes, but personally I love them both and have no reason to compare them.

    Maybe we can organize a Tweetstorm at them. :rommie:
     
  9. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    The kids these days might know how to copy and paste text off their TVs, but I just type the shit.

    Well, if Decades ever does another Tarzan Binge, you should keep your eye out for the giant clam episode(s?)...you can experience them for the first time.

    (I'm already forgetting, did the giant clam appear in two episodes?)

    ETA: Verified...

    Still not my cup of tea, but I found that I do have the Brothers Johnson version in my 1976 playlist.

    His '60s and early '70s singles are pretty good, definitely classics. He gets spotty after that.

    Desert island, one record--CHOOSE!

    On a Best of Sullivan from Mar. 24, 1963, Chubby Checker actually does the Limbo a couple times during a performance of "Limbo Rock."

    From Jan. 17, 1971...OK, Tony Bennett doing "What the World Needs Now" is pretty lame-o.

    Happened upon most of To Sir, with Love on cable. Had I known it was going to be on, I would have recorded it and given it a proper viewing. In addition to Lulu playing one of the students and doing the title song (currently on the charts 50 years ago this week), it featured an appearance by the Mindbenders:



    Good ending with Sir tearing up the letter for his other job...



    There's also another use of the song during a collage in the middle of the film that has verses which aren't in the single version. And we get an in-the-era reference to how the Beatles revolutionized fashions.

    I'd intended to use the afternoon off to start watching The Inhumans...but 1967 keeps pulling me back in!
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2017
  10. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Ah, I thought it was on their website.

    I may get the DVDs just for Giant Clam.

    That is certainly true.

    In that case, I'd go for "Massachusetts," because the sentimental value would be more important on the desert island.

    I only know that one from the movie, but it's pretty good.

    There can never be another Sidney Poitier.
     
  11. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    There kinda already is -- his daughter, Sydney Tamiia Poitier. ;)
     
  12. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Guess I lose the hypothetical bet, then. That's a melancholy little island ya got there. :p
     
  13. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Hah, fooled ya. :D It would be melancholy, but comforting.
     
  14. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    My Sister and I were at my Mother's house last night, so I brought up all the Classic Rock episodes of Ed Sullivan that I saved. But she just wanted to watch Jim Morrison over and over. He's "a fine specimen." :rommie:

    In other news, it seems that Comcast has dropped Grit. Not that I watched it almost ever, but I went looking to see what was on yesterday morning and it was gone. It's a shame to see any retro channel disappear.
     
  15. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Typical of Roger and Elizabeth to dismiss David's fears, making them seem thick-skulled, when one considers all of the inexplicable attacks (Willie was not draining anyone of blood--including himself), and their own history with the supernatural with ghosts and Laura the Phoenix.

    This is the Woodard I referred to: becoming a genuine enemy who does not write off anything not supported by his medical training.


    Advice that goes nowhere. Julia should know--by now--Barnabas' default position is to kill.

    Top shelf conclusion--the conflict/meeting everyone expected, and now it landed with force, leaving 1967 audiences wondering if Barnabas was going to carry out his threat after all.

    Yes, he's far from being the anti-hero vampire he would become during the 1975 arc. Right now, he's a perfect villain.


    Always a way out for Barnabas. Blame Willie for the attacks/kidnapping, and now trying to convince everyone that a child is a liar or worse.

    Yes, by Peter Turgeon--the third and last actor to take on the role, during the most intense period for the Woodard character.

    The writers were good at giving David some new way of holding on to his reputation no matter how much Barnabas tried to foil his every move. Again, Roger even questioning David so aggressively is a continuity issue, as Roger was exposed to several supernatural events long before the arrival of Barnabas.
     
  16. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Yep, that sexist nonsense was one of Batgirl's crimefighting tools. Not detective work or employing anything from a background in criminology (that did not exist for TV Barbara), but women's intuition. I will forever note that I cannot recall other 60s action TV characters such as Cathy Gale, Emma Peel or Honey West ever speaking in that way. Thanks, Bill Dozier.

    ...by not really fighting at all, and certainly not in the tradition of the fight choreography seen in seasons one, two and the movie. Thank you Howie Horwitz, who has been identified as the main culprit behind the "no punching or real fighting for Batgirl" BS. He seemed to miss all of the other female heroes--even one shot guests--who had changed that game in the years before Batman's third season went into production.
     
  17. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    One of yesterday's Sullivans, from Dec. 4, 1966, featured Ed giving Gary Lewis (of & The Playboys) a show biz farewell as he'd been drafted into the army. I did not know that he was Jerry Lewis's son.

    And this was not the first episode of the week that originally aired in December and had at least one Holiday-themed segment...here, the Supremes sing "My Favorite Things" in front of a backdrop of stacked presents.

    There's a Muppets episode coming up Monday according to the commercial.

    Too bad...if you'd brought a Who record, I could have thrown in a giant clam with the island....

    Well, he's effectively digging his own grave now...or rather, Doc Woodard #3's....

    See upthread...Eve on Ironside was also invoking women's intuition (which she did again in this week's episode). And you missed my point...that Batgirl was only saying that as a cover for her true source of information...whereas you've long argued that she really meant it.

    That said...I was just reacquainted with the Nora Clavicle episode as background viewing on H&I this morning...ye gods, that one was a terrible three steps backward...but more on that in January, I guess.

    _______

    50th Anniversary Viewing

    _______

    Mission: Impossible
    "The Slave: Part I"
    Originally aired October 8, 1967

    Phelps gets this week's orders from a good ol' reel-to-reel tape in a fire call box in a park.
    The time-filling to turn this story into a two-parter showed early on, when Jim's operative-selection scene played out at a more luxurious pace than usual, including a long moment in which Phelps contemplates over a stiff drink before bringing out the portfolio. This week's team includes a guest agent who wrote a report on slavery.

    Most of this episode is set-up for the main scheme...this part mainly consists of Barney's reconnaissance of the slave jail. When time is shorter, the IMF often magically has all the intel it needs about the people and locations involved in their operations. And it sure is convenient that when the slavers jail undercover Barney, they don't search him and find all the junk he's got stashed in his robes.

    If they'd wanted to do this as a one-hour episode, it seems like they could have left out the whole Phelps / Warren Stevens part of the mission; but perhaps that all comes together next week.

    Other TOS guests include Joseph Ruskin, Percy Rodrigues, Antoinette Bower, and Sid Haig.

    _______

    The Man from U.N.C.L.E.
    "The Prince of Darkness Affair: Part II"
    Originally aired October 9, 1967
    Open Channel Dyed Solo. Casual viewers may recognize this as the episode in which Solo sports white hair to infiltrate Sebastian's cult, the Third Way. (Another crack at ABC?)

    Guests include John Carradine, who's less recognizable when the plot specifically calls for him not to speak; Julie London as Sebastian's estranged wife; and Roy Jenson (Cloud William, "The Omega Glory").

    The rocket that Solo stole while undercover sure wasn't a Saturn V. But launching it from inside a building vaguely reminded me of the Baxter Building.

    This two-parter was released theatrically in 1968 as The Helicopter Spies. While there was some use of helicopters in both parts, I'd hardly say that it was prominent enough to be a defining feature of the installment. In any case, this half did feel a little more cinematic in its production values than last week's episode.

    _______

    The Rat Patrol
    "The Love Thine Enemy Raid"
    Originally aired October 9, 1967
    Yeah, way to go there, Quickdraw. She was just peeking her head out the back of the only truck in the German convoy that they didn't manage to blow up.

    I don't remember if it was a Season 1 or Season 2 episode, but this seemed like a variation on the premise of the episode with Ed Asner. They should have taken her to Ed's field hospital, he's cool with the Patrol.

    There's some good tension about whether they should save the nurse when she overhears some intel about Allied tank movements. In the uncharacteristically stage-shot coda, the Patrol gets news that the Germans hadn't learned about the tanks, and wonder whether she didn't talk or didn't live.

    _______

    Batman
    "A Horse of Another Color"
    Originally aired October 12, 1967
    Or as Ethel would pronounce it, "A Hoss of Another Color."

    Batman gets the stolen folio back within the hour, but his plan involved putting an ad in the paper...was he planning this ahead...?

    We don't often see Bruce and Dick walking into the study from the Batpoles, do we?

    It's odd that Batman would even think of recruiting Batgirl to be a jockey, but whatever works for the story. And nice palm trees they've got there at the Gotham Park Racetrack.

    _______

    Ironside
    "The Taker"
    Originally aired October 12, 1967
    I could tell from what we saw of her in the beginning that the killer was a woman, but putting (Peter) Mark Richman prominently in the story made for a good distraction from that. It did turn out that his character was in on the identity of the killer and helping to cover for her for personal reasons.

    Here's another early first-season episode of a series that I suspect may have been the first shot. As mentioned upthread, the series premise was set up in a TV movie that aired in Spring of 1967 (which I haven't seen), but this episode had a few conspicuous tidbits of series exposition that weren't in evidence in the earlier-aired episodes...notably explaining that Ironside is a former chief of detectives who's now serving as a consultant, emphasizing his unofficial status, and dropping a reference to his assistant Mark being an ex-con (which I didn't know). Also, Mark makes a comment about having "finally made the team" when Ironside hands him a gun.

    Guests include William Schallert, who does an M:I-quality accent and becomes a collateral murder victim in the cover-up of the crime being investigated.

    _______

    TGs2e6.jpg
    "Absence Makes the Heart Grow Nervous"
    Originally aired October 12, 1967
    This is the first installment of a separately titled two-parter. This half is actually all about Ann and Donald going to New York. Now the characters are supposed to live there, but they use Ann going away as an excuse to see all the touristy sights in the city together...which is played as a bigger deal than it should be, because they had to take the filming across the continent. Notably, there's no dialogue in the lengthy NYC tourism collage.


    The ride on the Statue of Liberty Ferry gives a view of Lower Manhattan just a year before construction began on the World Trade Center.

    Ann name-drops Boston and New Haven as other venues of the play.

    The NY segment includes a hippie gag, which involves Donald coming up on one who looks like Ann from behind. This had me wondering which of the shows I'm watching will give us our first full-on hippie episode. Batman is likely, as I know there's one coming up this season.

    Our two main-credits regulars are the only credited cast in the episode.

    "Oh, Donald" count: 6, I think...the lag on Me's site was particularly bad this time around, which was very distracting, so I may have missed some.

    _______

    Tarzan
    "The Blue Stone of Heaven: Part II"
    Originally aired October 13, 1967
    The episode starts with a recap of last week's climax of the statue being found and Colonel Takakombi declaring himself king and god. William Marshall does good megalomania. This half reemphasizes how legend has it that the idol brings its owner immortality. I sensed some irony on the horizon. There wasn't a lot happening in this episode...lots of scenes just seem to be filling time, especially those dwelling on the spectacle of the natives chanting for Takakombi while he stands on his pyramid.

    We get a good bit of Tarzan and Jai acting like a well-oiled machine when the captured Tarzan creates a distraction so that Jai can sneak in and partly untie him. Another scene has Jai disguising himself by putting Cheeta on his shoulders wrapped in a sack cloth.

    The underwater passage factors into the story again. Still no clam. :(

    This week has all the same Trek guests as last week. There are also at least two characters with substantial speaking roles who go uncredited.

    In the climax, Tarzan pushes the idol off the pyramid and convinces the natives that their god is a lie. Must have been a theme night on NBC.

    _______

    Star Trek
    "The Apple"
    Originally aired October 13, 1967
    Stardate 3715.3


    See my post here.

    _______

    The Prisoner
    "A. B. and C."
    Originally aired October 13, 1967 (UK)
    We have indication here that the 2's are indeed being replaced for their inability to break 6. Is this whole Village setup for the benefit of a few special cases like 6...or is he just that damn important?

    This episode's premise emphasizes something that I touched upon in my review of the first one...that 6 is as much an enigma to us as the Village is.

    That the Village people are so fixated on discovering who 6 may have been planning to sell out to suggests that it's not all just one big, happy global conspiracy...and that his own people are behind the Village.

    The dream monitoring/manipulating tech definitely places the series in SF/F territory.

    Regarding "A"...

    Even in his subconscious, 6 is a stubbornly uncooperative fellow. From the trouble he manages to create on the inside, I'm getting the Rorschachy vibe that they're trapped in there with him.

    The music at the party in the C dream sequence was pretty groovy. I saw C's identity coming when they established that 2 didn't know what "he" looked like. I also saw who D was going to be...the glasses and mustache were a little too visible through the mask.

    So we seem to have established that 6 wasn't selling out his people.

    Three episodes in, I have to say...this is a really engaging series. It's very effective in holding my attention, it gets my wheels turning, and the storytelling is tight and solid.

    _______

    The Avengers
    "The £50,000 Breakfast"
    Originally aired October 14, 1967 (UK)
    This one starts off as the show a little more in its wheelhouse...a mystery with a quirky, attention-grabbing angle...but it becomes difficult to get a handle on what it's really about and focuses a bit too much on the investigatees rather than the show's main asset, the investigators. Ultimately it comes down to a butler impersonating a recently departed financier who was covertly buried in a pet cemetery. We do get a scene of Emma going toe-to-toe with a female foe who was good enough to put up a fight with her.

    _______

    Get Smart
    "The Spirit Is Willing"
    Originally Aired October 14, 1967
    That description doesn't touch upon what the title refers to...that the mystery woman appears to be an already-dead witness. I guessed that the mother would really be Ann Ferris in disguise, as she was obviously wearing old age makeup. And it didn't make sense in the first place how everyone jumped to the conclusion that there was something supernatural involved, when Max could have just met somebody who was using a dead woman's name as an alias. Ina Balin was easy on the eyes, even when was she was unwigged but still made up to look weathered.

    We got a bit of a coincidental pond-spanning theme night with the fake death angle.

    The sight gag with Max's retracting bar was good. His apartment looked a lot different than it did...was it just last episode?

    Guests include Len Lesser, who was ringing a vague bell for me...but I never would have realized without looking it up that he was the future Uncle Leo from Seinfeld!

    _______
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2017
  18. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    50 Years Ago This Week
    Click here for Iconic Fake Footage.
    Click here and here for items covering the protest.


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Love Bug Leave My Heart Alone," Martha Reeves & The Vandellas
    • "Gettin' Together," Tommy James & The Shondells
    • "You're My Everything," The Temptations
    • "You Know What I Mean," The Turtles
    • "I Had a Dream," Paul Revere & The Raiders feat. Mark Lindsay
    • "I Make a Fool of Myself," Frankie Valli

    New on the chart:

    "Lady Bird," Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazlewood

    (#20 US; #47 UK)

    "Next Plane to London," The Rose Garden

    (#17 US)

    "Keep the Ball Rollin'," Jay & The Techniques

    (#14 US)

    "I Say a Little Prayer," Dionne Warwick

    (#4 US; #8 R&B)

    "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," Gladys Knight & The Pips

    (#2 US; #1 R&B; #47 UK)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • Mission: Impossible, "The Slave: Part II"
    • The Man from U.N.C.L.E., "The Master's Touch Affair"
    • The Rat Patrol, "The Darkest Raid"
    • Batman, "The Unkindest Tut of All"
    • Ironside, "An Inside Job"
    • That Girl, "The Philadelphia Story"
    • Tarzan, "Muguma Curse"
    • Star Trek, "The Doomsday Machine"
    • The Prisoner, "Free for All"
    • The Avengers, "Dead Man's Treasure"
    • Get Smart, "Maxwell Smart, Private Eye"
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    Last edited: Oct 15, 2017
  19. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2001
    Yeah, that's a memorable cue. It reminds me of the refrain from The Monkees' "Vallery." I was rather surprised a couple of years ago to hear it in a documentary feature on a Doctor Who DVD. Apparently it's from a stock music library, like a lot of The Prisoner's music.

    I find that "A, B and C" works better if it comes after "The General," Colin Gordon's other episode as Number Two, which was filmed first. His sense of desperation in "A, B and C," his willingness to push the experiment to extremes and do anything to avoid failure, makes more sense if it's his second and last chance to break Six.
     
  20. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    The Old Mixer, Somewhere in Connecticut
    I had to go back and listen again, but now that you mention it, I do hear the resemblance. It was remarkably good for '60s stock music in capturing the vibe of the popular music of the era...often such stock music is infamously cheesy and inauthentic-sounding.

    Noted. That episode is still a few weeks in the future for me.