The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    :angryrazz:

    I’m not aware of a public response, but they ceased fire after this, and were known to see each other socially in subsequent years...including engaging in a jam session at a party during John's "Lost Weekend" era in L.A. The incident that gets covered in people's books the most is the time that John turned Paul away because he was dropping by the Dakota too much. Somewhere along the way, they learned that they got along just fine if they stuck to talking about their families and whatnot, and left the ongoing Beatles litigation to the lawyers.

    Not sure what you mean by that, but they were tracks on the LP, in the places I described, that weren't listed on the label or packaging.
     
  2. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Okay, some miscellaneous bits of trivia regarding "Wild Life" from the book that came with the deluxe edition.

    Recorded over a three-day period (24th-26th July 1971) in Studio Number 2 at Abbey Road under the pseudonym "Sam Browne" with engineers Tony Clark and Alan Parsons.

    "Mumbo" was recorded on July 26th. According to Tony Clark and Denny Seiwell, Tony set up the microphones around the band and when he returned to the control room, the band was jamming. Paul and Tony looked at each other, Tony turned to Alan and said, "Quick, record." What you hear is the first and only take. The lyric sheet at the back of the book simply says, "Ad Lib".

    "Bip Bop" was recorded on July 24th and was based around a refrain that Paul and Linda's daughter, Mary, would sing while walking around the house.

    "Love Is Strange", recorded on July 24th. Written by Bo Diddley under his then-wife's name and recorded in 1956. Micky & Sylvia's version, recorded later that year, was the one that Paul and Linda were both familiar with; and, after a trip to Jamaica, decided to record the song with a reggae beat. Originally planned as Wings debut single b/w "I Am Your Singer" but replaced by "Give Ireland Back To The Irish."

    "Wild Life" the title track, was recorded on July 26th. It is the oldest song on the album, having been written in November 1966 after a trip to Africa with Paul's then-girlfriend Jane Asher. While in Kenya they visited a wildlife reserve where Paul saw a sign that said that the animals had the right of way. It's Paul's way of saying that the animals should be allowed to roam free while man should be caged up.

    "Some People Never Know", recorded July 25th and the second oldest song on the album, having been written in January 1969 during the "Get Back"/"Let It Be" sessions. It's a love song to Linda while taking a swipe at the press who were slagging Paul off for dating/marrying Linda.

    "I Am Your Singer" recorded July 24th. A simple pledge of love, with Paul and Linda singing into a single microphone.

    "Tomorrow", recorded on July 26th. A "RAM" refugee, written too late for the album, resurrected for "Wild Life". "I'd been let down a lot in my mind," McCartney says, referring to the broken promises and tested friendships, particularly in The Beatles, summed up in the chorus of "Tomorrow". "I didn't want to be let down again. John, meanwhile is doing a song with The Beatles, "Don't Let Me Down". The idea was, in the future, let's make it better."

    "Dear Friend" was recorded on July 24th. Two demos are included on the "Wild Life" deluxe edition. The first being recorded at the end of January 1971 following the publication of the two-part "Lennon Remembers" interview in Rolling Stone magazine, and a second in March 1971, during the recording of "RAM".

    "John could be very cruel, absolutely," McCartney says. Lennon was also a "wounded pigeon, wounded right from the start" - abandoned by his father, losing his mother Julia in a road accident when he was 17. "As Liverpool guys, you just get on with it. Now this time around with The Beatles, there were a whole new set of cruelties to deal with." It was easy to fall back on the feeling, McCartney says, of "Yeah, I'll get you back."

    But, he continues, "I could see the side of John that was "Give Peace A Chance". There were two ways of responding to him. The one in "Dear Friend" was, "Why don't we sit down, shut up and have a glass of wine? We've known each other too long to really get into this bullshit." That invitation was the entire lyric: two short verses, repeated, with an offer to "throw the wine" and challenge to come clean on the insults. ("Are you afraid, or is it true?")

    Cut live, in one take, with Paul on piano, Denny Seiwell providing light percussion and orchestra.

    As an aside, I can't help but wonder if Paul took a copy of the album with him when he and Linda visited John and Yoko in Manhattan in January 1972, and played it for John, seeing as the album was released in December 1971.

    One final song was written and demoed prior to the start of recording, but never made it to the studio.

    "When The Wind Is Blowing" - written in August 1969 shortly after the birth of Paul and Linda's daughter Mary. Linda was in the hospital recuperating and Paul noticed a reproduction of Picasso's "The Old Guitarist" on the wall. McCartney saw the way the guitarist was fingering the guitar and tried to mimic the chords. "A lightbulb went off in my head: 'What chord is that?' It looked like it was two strings. 'You know what would be cool? To write a song with only two fingers. So, I wrote this thing."

    The song/demo would remain forgotten until 2014, when Paul spent a few days in Los Angeles collaborating with Kayne West. Paul related the story to Kayne and played/whistled the tune. Kayne's engineer recorded it and it became the sample/hook of West's 2015 single "All Day."
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2022
  3. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    When I saw Paul at Climate Pledge Arena, there was a story that he told, prior to singing his tribute song to John, "Here Today", where he tells of time shortly after The Beatles broke up, he went over to John's house after seeing some particularly nasty things said by John about Paul and The Beatles in the press and Paul started into John, calling him everything he could think of. John pulled his glasses down, looked Paul in the eye and said, "It's only me, you know." And Paul realized John was right, for all the stuff John said publicly about The Beatles, privately, Paul knew John didn't mean it, and they were able to remain on good terms after that.
     
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  4. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Oh, that's right. I forgot about that. :(

    :rommie:

    Politics, religion, and litigation.

    Third sides are a cool thing that you could do when pressing vinyl. My friend and I discovered it when we were listening to Monty Python albums in the 70s. Every so often one of the sides would have completely different (and much shorter) content. At first we thought we were losing our marbles, but then discovered that it all depended on where you dropped the needle. It turns out that there's a Wiki page on the phenomenon. Can't do that with CDs or streaming services or direct neural network brain connections or whatever the kids are doing these days. :rommie:

    That's pretty nifty. I like that.
     
  5. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    Really Big Anniversary Viewing

    _______

    The Ed Sullivan Show
    Season 18, episode 37
    Originally aired May 29, 1966

    Performances listed on Metacritic:
    • Bobby Vinton - "Blue Clarinet" and an international medley
    • The Thomas Group - "Autumn" (instrumental rock band featuring Tony Thomas, Danny Thomas' son)
    • Jane Morgan sings a "Fiddler on the Roof" medley ("Matchmaker, Matchmaker," "Sunrise Sunset" and "To Life")
    • Shani Wallis sings "Let Me Love You"
    • Wayne & Shuster (comedy team) - tailor shop sketch
    • Jack Colvin and Yvonne Wilder (comedy team) [Yes, that Jack Colvin!]
    • Ed interviews Sophia Loren (on film?). She talks about working with director Charles Chaplin on the film "Countess from Hong Kong."
    • Edward Villella & Patricia McBride (dancers from the New York City Ballet Company)
    • Diane Shelton (baton twirler)
    • The Indian Dance Festival of Santa Fe, New Mexico - perform three Indian Ceremonial dances
    • Audience bows: Robert La Follette Bennett (head of Indian dance tour), Father William Trivert, and Jimmy Jones (horse trainer)
    _______

    The Ed Sullivan Show
    Season 18, episode 38
    Originally aired June 5, 1966

    Performances listed on Metacritic:
    • On tape: The Beatles perform "Rain" & "Paperback Writer" (segment begins with intro by the Beatles)

    • Robert Goulet sings "Mame" and "Daydreamer"
    • Bobbe Norris and Robert Goulet sing "Two Sleepy People"
    • Bobbe Norris (jazz vocalist) - "Silently."
    • Vincent Lopez & orchestra (Big Band music) - includes piano duet (song possibly "Nola")
    • Richard Pryor (comedian) - routine about slavery throughout history
    • Jack Benny (comedian)
    • Totie Fields (comedian) - jokes about her weight
    • Charlotte Rae (comedian) - spoofs opera singers
    • Pepper Davis and Tony Reese (comedy duo) - tap dance on roller skates
    • Audience bows: Joseph Cheng & Mr. Cheng (scholarship winner with his father), Ken Rosewall (tennis champion) & Richard Taylor (horse trainer) On film: U.S. Navy flyers "The Blue Angels" are shown performing air stunts

    _______

    This is odd and a bit embarrassing...I'd never looked at the recording dates vs. Imagine's release date. Certainly the "some people can't sleep at night" chorus seems too on-the-nose not to be referring to "How Do You Sleep?"

    Ahhh...I've never heard of that, and it sounds pretty nifty!
     
  6. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    No worries. The Wiki entry re "Wild Life" is woefully incomplete and lacking in detail. The only reason I know what the song is about is due to the personal recollections included in the book in the deluxe volume. Although it was written during the "Get Back"/"Let It Be" sessions, considering some of the pressure McCartney must have been feeling at the time, I'm sure the lyrics can be open to interpretation as a dig at John and his behavior.
     
  7. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Ringo, ever the modest drummer, considers his drumming on "Rain" to be his best performance ever.

    Paperback Writer - In their backing vocals over the third verse, Lennon and Harrison sing the title of the French nursery rhyme "Frère Jacques". Also, the mono version includes more echo on Paul's voice and more fills and taps on the hi-hat by Ringo.
     
  8. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Wow, and more than a decade younger. I wonder how he was.

    "Paperback Writer" is a personal fave.

    There's quite a generational and stylistic range-- I wonder if they ever actually met. It would have been great to see them together on stage. Theoretically, anyway.

    Yeah, it's very cool. I read the Wiki article later and there were a lot more examples than I knew of-- some going back to the late 1800s!
     
  9. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    Really Big Anniversary Viewing

    _______

    The Ed Sullivan Show
    Season 18, episode 39
    Originally aired June 12, 1966

    Performances listed on Metacritic:
    • The Dave Clark Five - "Look Before You Leap" & "Please Tell Me Why"
    • Wayne Newton - "The Good Old Days," "My Country Tis of Thee" and "Somebody to Love"


    [Watching that second clip, I keep expecting Mr. Moose to drop ping pong balls on him.]​
    • Peter Gennaro does a tap dance routine with 6 female dancers
    • University of North Carolina Men's Glee Club - sing (a capella) "Hey Look Me Over" and "Dixie"
    • Solvi Wang sings "Getting to Know You" (in English and Norwegian)
    • Joey Adams (comedian) - stand-up routine
    • Jackie Vernon (comedian)
    • Jackie Kahane (comedian)
    • Elwyn Ambrose (writer) - does a routine with a cat puppet that recites poetry
    _______

    The Sullivan account has several clips listed as being from June 19, 1966, that I'd previously covered as the episode Metacritic had listed as Season 18, episode 7 (October 24, 1965). However, these Herman's Hermits clips weren't available then:


    The Hermits seem pretty hardcore following Wayne Newton and the glee club.

    _______

    I have to wonder if the truth isn't somewhere in-between and being downplayed in the liner notes. Wild Life still came out three months after Imagine--plenty of time for a bit of late-production song repurposing.

    There are clips of Colvin and his partner doing routines on other shows. The one I put on in the background for a bit was some sort of mock-Shakespearian thing.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2022
  10. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Nothing like a little creepy faux patriotism to start off the holiday weekend. :rommie:

    And then go after him with his antlers to confirm the kill.

    At first I thought that said lap dance. I was impressed with Ed for a second.

    Okay, this intrigues me. :rommie:

    They're Acid Rock, man, just like the Beach Boys. [​IMG]

    Gonna look that up, too. :rommie:
     
  11. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    55 Years Ago This Week

    July 2
    • The newly activated Vela 3 and Vela 4 satellites, activated in May to monitor Soviet nuclear testing by detecting gamma rays, recorded the first of many gamma-ray bursts of unknown origin, starting at 14:19 UTC. When the Vela satellites began picking up similar bursts every two weeks, "US authorities were worried, but they soon realised that neither China nor the Soviet Union could test nuclear weapons every other week"; nearly 30 years later, on February 28, 1997, improved satellite technology would confirm that the gamma-ray bursts came from other galaxies, producing "the most violent explosions known to mankind" that "emit more energy in a few seconds than our Sun will generate in its entire lifetime."
    • "Operation Buffalo" began with the worst single-day loss suffered by the United States Marines during the Vietnam War. While patrolling the area around Con Thien in the Quảng Trị Province, near South Vietnam's border with North Vietnam, the 400 members of Alpha Company and Bravo Company of the 1st Battalion, 9th Marines were ambushed by the North Vietnamese Army; 84 were killed, nine were missing and 190 were wounded for a total of 283 casualties. The total number of deaths in the operation would be 159 Americans and 1,290 of the North Vietnamese during the seven days between July 2 and July 8.
    • The government of Israel announced that Palestinian Arab refugees, who had fled their homes in the West Bank after its invasion in June, would be allowed to return to their homes, but that they would only have until August 10 to do so. Between 80,000 and 150,000 residents had fled across the Jordan River during and after the Six-Day War, and were in camps in Jordan. The government announced, however, that anyone who crossed into Jordan after July 4 would not be allowed to return at all.
    • In London, diplomat Yaakov Herzog of Israel conducted the first of his secret peace negotiation discussions with King Hussein of Jordan since the end of the Six-Day War.

    July 4
    • After a bitter all-night debate, the British House of Commons voted 99 to 14 to approve the Sexual Offences Act 1967, decriminalizing homosexuality in England and Wales. The law, which would receive royal assent on July 27, removed penalties only for relations between gay men over the age of 21. Sexual relations between lesbians were still prohibited, and the law did not apply to Scotland or to Northern Ireland. Moreover, the change in the law did not apply to the armed forces or to the merchant marines, and while the age of consent for heterosexual relations was 16 years old, the law still penalized homosexual acts involving anyone 20 years old or younger.
    • Hundreds of Muslim and Christian citizens of Bethlehem, known for being the birthplace of Jesus Christ and captured from Jordan during the Six-Day War, petitioned the Israeli government to ask that their city be formally annexed into Israel. While Israel had annexed a large part of the territory west of the Jordan River, Bethlehem had been excluded.

    July 5
    • A group of 1,500 soldiers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, led by 11 white soldiers of fortune under the command of mercenary Jean Schramme of Belgium, mutinied and attacked Camp Ntele, a military base outside of Stanleyville, and massacred 400 people (including families of the soldiers killed). The uprising against President Joseph Mobutu would kill at least 2000 people before being suppressed on November 5. Other troops from Schramme's group came across the border from neighboring Rwanda and took control of the border city of Bukavu.
    • A group of three university presidents, three university vice-presidents, and four university library directors met on the campus of Ohio State University to hear the proposal of Frederick G. Kilgour to implement the first plan for an online computer network of library holdings, the Ohio College Library Center, OCLC. OCLC would later expand beyond Ohio and change its name, though not its initials, to Online Computer Library Center.

    July 6
    • Ninety-four people, mostly children, were killed when a double-decker train collided with a gasoline truck at a crossing in the East Germany town of Langenweddingen, seven miles southwest of Magdeburg.
    • Nigerian forces invaded the secessionist Southern Region, which had declared its independence as the Republic of Biafra on May 30. Before the Nigerian civil war's end on January 13, 1970, between one and three million Nigerian Biafrans would die, most of them from starvation, along with several hundred thousand Nigerians. The first attacks were at Ogoja and Nsukka and the towns of Obudu and Obolo were captured the next day.

    July 7
    • Pan American Flight 100 from New York landed in London, becoming the first commercial airline flight to make a fully automatic landing without the intervention of the crew. The four-engine Boeing 727 used the new Precision Approach and Landing System (PALS), guided by signals from Heathrow Airport. The 111 passengers on board Pan Am 100 were not informed until after the "no hands" landing, but applauded the announcement.
    • "All You Need Is Love," which had been premiered before a live worldwide audience on the Our World special program, was released as a 45 rpm record in the United Kingdom; it would be released in the United States on July 17.

    July 8
    • The American Independent Party, the last political party, outside of the Democrats and Republicans, to win electoral votes in a U.S. presidential election, was founded by a group of conservatives in Bakersfield, California. In the 1968 election, the AIP would nominate Alabama Governor George C. Wallace for President, and would receive 13.5% of the popular vote and 46 electoral votes from five states (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Georgia, and Alabama).
    • Died: Vivien Leigh, 53, British film actress and winner of two Academy Awards, known for her roles in Gone With the Wind and A Streetcar Named Desire


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "All I Need," The Temptations (10 weeks)
    • "Have You Seen Her Face," The Byrds (4 weeks)
    • "I Got Rhythm," The Happenings (13 weeks)
    • "Mirage," Tommy James & The Shondells (10 weeks)
    • "The Oogum Boogum Song," Brenton Wood (12 weeks)
    • "Tramp," Otis & Carla (9 weeks)

    Recent and new on the chart:

    "My World Fell Down," Sagittarius

    (June 24; #70 US)

    "Pictures of Lily," The Who

    (July 1; #51 US; #4 UK)

    "Omaha," Moby Grape

    (#88 US)

    "You Keep Me Hangin' On," The Vanilla Fudge

    (#67 US; #18 UK; rereleased in 1968, reaching #6 US)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • The Saint, "The Man Who Liked Lions"

    _______

    Timeline entries are quoted from the Wiki pages for the month or year.

    _______

    Now, do we have cause to cast aspersions on Wayne Newton's patriotism?
     
  12. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Yvonne Wilder was also a screenwriter, going on to co-write the script for the second Count Yorga movie, The Return of Count Yorga (AIP, 1971), where she also portrayed a mute caretaker at an orphanage...who ends up on the business end of a knife, at the hands of a child under vampire Yorga's control.

    As for Colvin, I hear he ended up on a late 70s/early 80s TV series playing a stalker of some doctor...
     
  13. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    GRBs: One answer to the Fermi Paradox.

    That seems a bit odd.

    That was actually pretty good.

    The Who. 'nuff said.

    Nothing really bad about it, but #88 sounds right. :rommie:

    The psychedelic interpretation.

    No, nothing personal, just an observation of how ideology corrupts the idea of patriotism.

    There are good Night Stalkers and there are bad Night Stalkers. :rommie:
     
  14. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Ooh boy. Where to begin with this one. Produced by Gary Usher, who cut his teeth working with Brian Wilson, The Byrds, Simon and Garfunkel, and Chad and Jeremy, among others.

    At the time, he was working with Chad and Jeremy, who were in a bit of a career slump. Gary Usher cast around, looking for songs that he thought would help resurrect their career. He came across a record written by John Carter and Geoff Stevens and recorded by The Ivy League that he thought would be perfect for the duo.

    My World Fell Down - YouTube

    Chad and Jeremy turned the song down and soon parted company with Gary Usher.

    Gary Usher thought the song would be a hit, so he recorded a version of it using The Wrecking Crew as the backing band, with Glen Campbell on lead vocals and a vocal assist from Beach Boy Bruce Johnston ("my world fell down", "wish I didn't feel like winter") and Terry Melcher (son of Doris Day and producer of later Byrd's albums). The interlude was provided by The Firesign Theater and unconfirmed bits from The Beach Boys "SMiLE" album which was being recorded in the same facility.

    Usher played the song for Clive Davis, who agreed that the song would be a hit and he wanted to release it, as well as an album. He wanted to know the name of the band, which of course, there was no band. Usher gave Clive Davis the name of his astrological sign, "Sagittarius".

    So, now Usher had a name and a recording contract; what about a band and an album?

    At the same time Gary Usher was signing the record deal, he had become friends with Curt Boettcher, a singer-songwriter-producer who co-wrote The Association's "Along Comes Mary".

    Along Comes Mary (Demo) - YouTube

    Boettcher, at the time, had formed a vocal-harmony group called The Ballroom and recorded an album, which, unfortunately, went unreleased due to label interference.

    Gary and Curt used the unreleased Ballroom tracks as a jumping off point for the Sagittarius album "Present Tense". Fully half the Sagittarius album is made up of Ballroom songs - "Would You Like To Go", "Musty Dusty", "Another Time" "Song To The Magic Frog", "Keeper Of The Games" are all present in their original form, more or less. The remaining six songs on the album are collaborations between Usher, Boettcher and various other artists that the two had worked with previously.

    The resulting album "Present Tense" was released on 3-July-1968 and did not chart. Usher and Boettcher broke up, Usher continuing his successful production career and recording a follow-up Sagittarius album called "The Blue Marble" with no involvement from Boettcher.

    Boettcher would go onto to form the group The Millennium and record the album "Begin Here", which is considered one of the first examples of "Sunshine Pop" as well as the most expensive records ever recorded at the time that nearly bankrupted the Columbia label. (It probably didn't help that Columbia pulled a "Moby Grape" and released three singles from the album simultaneously.) Boettcher would continue to work, lending his vocals to Elton John's "Don't Go Breaking My Heart", Dennis Wilson's album "Pacific Ocean Blue" and The Beach Boys "L.A. (Light Album)" among other albums recorded in Los Angeles in the '70s.

    Edit to add - I've also read a story somewhere that this single, along with the acetates of 'Sgt. Pepper' that Paul McCartney brought with him when he visited Los Angeles in mid-1967 are what convinced Brian Wilson that he had lost the 'production race' with regards to the 'SMiLE' album, which led to his breakdown and subsequent scrapping of the album and withdrawal from the day-to-day production of Beach Boys recordings.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2022
  15. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    50 Years Ago This Week

    July 2
    • The musical Fiddler on the Roof closed on Broadway after a record 3,242 performances. With music by Jerry Bock and lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, Fiddler had first been performed on September 22, 1964.
    • Lawyers for John Lennon and Yoko Ono prepare their final brief, outlining the reasons why John and Yoko wish to stay in the USA.

    July 3 – Prime Minister of India Indira Gandhi and President of Pakistan Zulfikar Ali Bhutto signed the Simla Agreement, resolving to peacefully negotiate future disputes, releasing prisoners of war, and withdrawing their military forces behind their sides of a 460-mile long border.

    July 4
    • The first Rainbow Gathering is held in Colorado.
    • Lord Harlech, the former British ambassador to the USA, writes to the US Immigration and Naturalization Service in John Lennon's defence.

    July 5 – In San Francisco, a team of FBI agents stormed a hijacked Pacific Southwest Airlines jet, and killed the two men who had been holding 86 people on board Flight 710 hostage. One passenger, E.H. Stanley Carter of Quebec, was killed in the crossfire and two other men were wounded, including actor Victor Sen Yung, who portrayed Hop Sing on the TV series Bonanza.

    July 6
    • The first payment of "hush money", via the Committee to Re-Elect the President, to the Watergate burglars, was made. Over eight months, lasting until March 22, 1973, almost $430,000 was paid to the men to keep them from implicating the White House in the break-in of DNC headquarters.
    • Died: Brandon De Wilde, 30, child actor. Nominated for an Oscar at age 10 for his performance in the film Shane, De Wilde was killed when his car skidded off of the road during a thunderstorm near Denver.

    July 7
    • Harold B. Lee was formally ordained as the 11th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), succeeding Joseph Fielding Smith, who had died five days earlier. At 73, Lee was the youngest church president in 40 years.
    • United Nations Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim, who was later shown to have been an active participant in the Holocaust, visited the former Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz.

    July 8 – A three-year, $750,000,000 deal, for the Soviet Union to purchase grain from the United States, was announced by Henry Kissinger from the "Western White House" at San Clemente. The Soviets, who needed to make up for agricultural shortfalls, agreed to purchase the grain on credit at 6⅛% annual interest, the standard rate for the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, whose Secretary, Earl Butz, had conferred with his counterpart, Soviet Agriculture Minister Vladimir Matskevich.


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Diary," Bread (11 weeks)
    • "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face," Roberta Flack (18 weeks)
    • "It's Going to Take Some Time," Carpenters (10 weeks)
    • "Morning Has Broken," Cat Stevens (14 weeks)
    • "Tumbling Dice," The Rolling Stones (10 weeks)
    • "Walkin' in the Rain with the One I Love," Love Unlimited (14 weeks)

    Recent and new on the chart:

    "Starman," David Bowie

    (July 1; #65 US; #10 UK)

    "Starting All Over Again," Mel & Tim

    (#19 US; #4 R&B)

    "Power of Love," Joe Simon

    (#11 US; #1 R&B)

    "Popcorn," Hot Butter

    (#9 US; #4 AC; #5 UK)

    "I'm Still in Love with You," Al Green

    (#3 US; #33 AC; #1 R&B; #35 UK)

    _______

    Timeline entries are quoted from the Wiki pages for the month or year and Mark Lewisohn's The Beatles Day by Day, with minor editing as needed.

    _______

    This is notable for having been on the acclaimed compilation album Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the First Psychedelic Era, 1965–1968.

    A cute one...given its UK performance, I have to assume that the song being all about masturbation must have slipped by the ban-happy Beeb censors.

    Well, the song made it onto the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame list, and the album onto the Rolling Stone albums list. Oddly, the full album isn't available on iTunes, though I downloaded select tracks from a compilation that was available.

    And the single edit...I find the full version a bit tedious in this case.

    And stalkees you wouldn't like when they're angry...
     
  16. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    I used to dance to this in gym class back in elementary school as well as the roller-skating rink. I can still remember the moves. (Don't ask me to demonstrate them.)
     
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  17. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    The Old Mixer, Somewhere in Connecticut
    It has a vague familiarity to me, which may have been from first-hand exposure. I'd previously skipped this when I was populating this era in my collection, but I may still get it, as it passes the "Beautiful Sunday" test.
     
  18. publiusr

    publiusr Vice Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    Location:
    publiusr
    1972 was the last time I felt free…

    I started first grade that year. I made the mistake of praying that my future job would be like homework…pen to paper.

    Ugh…
     
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  19. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Location:
    RJDiogenes of Boston
    "He's all yours. The price you pay for that little uprising. Happy Independence Day!"

    That came out quite a bit later. Very weird. And the Russians knew about it while he was Secretary-General.

    Good one, although my favorite Bowie period is still a couple of years off.

    I vaguely remember this one. Meh.

    He's really not much without Jack Kirby.

    Oh, man, I certainly remember this. :rommie: Not only was it omnipresent and infectious, but it was used on station promos for Channel 56.

    Good old Al Green. He never fails to be Al Green.

    It sounds so sweet. It took me a while to catch on, too. :rommie:

    Interesting.

    Actually, the format for Incredible Hulk was what Darren McGavin wanted for Night Stalker, but from the opposite perspective-- he thought Kolchak should be pursuing a revived Janos Skorzeny across the country. Personally, I prefer that he went up against all different monsters every week.
     
  20. publiusr

    publiusr Vice Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    Location:
    publiusr
    The make-up used on the demon Sargoth from The Norliss Tapes is very like that from The Incredible Hulk
     
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