So What Are you Reading?: Generations

Discussion in 'Trek Literature' started by captcalhoun, Dec 22, 2011.

  1. Veeza

    Veeza Lieutenant Junior Grade Red Shirt

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    Halfway through Mere Anarchy
    Things Fall Apart
    was great, The Centre Cannot Hold was good and Shadows of the Indignant was...ok I think this says more about me and is not a reflection of the book but I just don't enjoy stories set during 'The Lost Years' period :shrug:
    Three more to go...

    I've also added comics to my reading and have started on Fantastic Four (1961) with issues #1 & #2. Enjoyed them both so lets see where this goes.
     
  2. thribs

    thribs Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Some Amazing Spider-Man comics.
     
  3. thribs

    thribs Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I think that is what they are implying but they never explicitly say it is her.
     
  4. Cyfa

    Cyfa Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    over the Cusp
    The Indispensible Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson, and White Trash Warlock by David R. Slater.
     
  5. Reanok

    Reanok Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    So Long and thanks for the Fish by Douglas Adams
     
  6. Daddy Todd

    Daddy Todd Fleet Captain Premium Member

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    I found a bunch of issues of Juanita & Robert "Buck" Coulson's legendary science fiction fanzine, Yandro, on FANAC.org. Nearly a complete run, from the early 50's to the 80's. I've skimmed/read most of the '60's issues, and I'm just getting into the 70's. The Coulsons were at the convention where the two Trek pilots were aired, and they were fans from Day One (especially Juanita). It's entertaining to see their reactions to Star Trek as new episodes aired.

    In 1968 Juanita published the two-issue fanzine ST-Phile, one of the handful of Trek 'zines published while the show was still on the air. I grabbed those from FANAC as well, and will read them shortly.
     
  7. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Which ones?
     
  8. thribs

    thribs Vice Admiral Admiral

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    #831 onwards. Just finished #866
     
  9. MorbidGorn

    MorbidGorn Ensign Red Shirt

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    Voyager: Echoes by Smith, Rusch and Hoffman.

    quite good, Voyager encounters parallel universes and I really like that since you see them experiencing similar elements to the “Parallels” TNG episode and other novels that deal with parallel universes.
     
  10. Reanok

    Reanok Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Mostly Harmless by Douglas Adams
     
  11. youngtrek

    youngtrek Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Brandon, Florida
    I finished reading American Comic Book Chronicles: The 1940s: 1940-1944 (2019) by Kurt F. Mitchell with Roy Thomas (the latter credited as “Consultant”) on Saturday.

    The American Comic Book Chronicles series is published by TwoMorrows Publishing and is their in depth year-by-year survey of the entire publishing history of American comic books. Released out of order, the first volume out was the 1960-1964 volume in 2012, followed by the 1980s (2013), 1950s (2013), 1965-1969 (2014), 1970s (2014), 1990s (2018), and 1940-1944 (2019).

    The second half of the 1940s (which has been delayed several times due to various reasons) should be out in 2022 hopefully. And there are also plans for volumes on the 1930s and 2000s.

    This volume is broken down into the following chapters: Chapter One: 1940 - Rise of the Supermen, Chapter Two: 1941 - Countdown to Cataclysm, Chapter Three: 1942 - Comic Books Go To War, Chapter Four: 1943 - Relax: Read Comics, and Chapter Five: 1944 - The Paper Chase.

    For those not into comics history, this book probably would come across as an overwhelming amount of unfamiliar names (both of individuals and of publishing companies), unheard of comics characters and titles, and dates.

    For comics history buffs like myself, however, this is a real “must have” reference work. The author (Mitchell) breaks down each year by publisher in business at the time, detailing the titles they released and the individual character features running in those titles and who wrote and drew them (where known). He also goes into the behind the scenes goings ons at the various publishing houses: how they started, how certain key artists and writers ended up there, and how the more popular characters were created. And he also reports how external factors like World War II, paper rationing, and early anti-comics opinion among some influential circles impacted the comics industry. (For example: With the war dragging on, the U.S. government put paper quotas on publishers of magazines, driving nearly all of the comic book publishers to lower their individual issue page counts from 68 pages (the average length in 1940) to 52 pages in 1944, and forcing many monthly titled to have to skip a month here and there as well as the dropping of many lesser back up features.)

    Of course, the big publishers (Detective Comics (DC), All-American Comics, Timely Publications (Marvel), Fawcett Publications (the makers of Captain Marvel comics), Dell/Western (publishers of many licensed titles like Disney and Warner Bros), M.L.J. Magazines (the makers of Archie comics as well as its own range of superheroes), Gilberton Company (Classics Illustrated), and Quality Comics Group) are given a lot of attention. But so are mostly forgotten (today) lesser publishers like Ace Magazines, Better Publications/Standard Magazines/Nedor Publications, Centaur Publications, Charlton Publishing (just starting out), Columbia Comic Corporation, Comic House/Magazine House, Crestwood Publications, David McKay Company, Dynamic Publications, Eastern Color Printing Company, Fiction House, Fox Publications, Funnies, Inc. (one of several packaging shops creating comics stories for other publishers to release), Great Comics Publishing, Harvey Comics, Helnit Publishing/Et-Es-Go Mgazines/Continental Magazines, King Features Syndicate, Magazine Enterprises, Majestic Studios, Novelty Press, Parents’ Magazine Press, Register and Tribune Syndicate, Roche & Iger, S.M. Iger Studio, Spark Publications, Street & Smith Publications, United Features Syndicate, Wm. H. Wise & Co., and Worth Publishing.

    Way too many names of individuals (comic book publishers, editors, writers, artists, etc.) for me to list them here. Suffice it to say that even the most obscure are reported on here, as are the many comic book characters that appeared in print from 1940 to 1944 (which has to literally be hundreds if not thousands thanks to the then standard format of six to eight short features per standard comic book issue plus the tendency for publishers to copy the success of their peers. Thus, endless Captain America, Tarzan, Sheena Queen of the Jungle, and masked “mystery men” knock offs, as well as the still popular in 1940-1942 or so non superhero adventure strips featuring fighter pilots, jungle adventurers, detectives, cowboys, etc.

    And then you have the increase in popularity of humor titles (both teen humor like “Archie” and funny animal humor titles) around 1943 and 1944, to the point where you start to see some formerly superhero centric titles either being dropped for humor ones or converted into them (a foreshadowing of the disappearance for the most part of superhero comics in the late 1940s and early to mid 1950s).

    It took me four months of off and on reading to make my way through American Comic Book Chronicles: The 1940s: 1940-1944 because every chapter is just crammed full of information. It’s not the most “readable” of material but it’s still very interesting for those into the subject matter.

    I look forward to moving on to the next volume (which, as I mentioned above, is the 1950s volume since the 1945-1949 volume isn’t out yet). I’ll probably have to take a bit if a break before jumping into that one, though, as I’m sure it will also be a long (yet interesting) read.

    I gave this five out of five stars on GoodReads.


    David Young
     
  12. youngtrek

    youngtrek Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    I am not the person who wrote what you are referring to here but I don’t think he meant that his original plan was to alternate between male and female James Bond authors but was saying alternate between the two in general, and that his next book should have been by a female author but that he went with Fleming’s Bond novel instead because he’d just watched No Time To Die. Or, that’s how I interpreted it. (I don’t think there have been very many female authors to have written a James Bond novel, at least not the main series ones. I know that most have been by Ian Fleming, Kingsley Amis, John Gardner, and Raymond Benson. That’s as far as my personal copies go, although I know there have been other more recent Bond authors (Anthony Horowitz being one of them). I’m guessing (without looking) that any female Bond authors must have been within the last decade or so, or wrote more peripheral Bond material like Ms. Moneypenny or “young Bond” tie-in books.


    David Young
     
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  13. Veeza

    Veeza Lieutenant Junior Grade Red Shirt

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    Love that book - especially the way it deals with the aftermath of alternate Harry which the show just ignored.
     
  14. hbquikcomjamesl

    hbquikcomjamesl Commodore Commodore

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    Dr. Trump's prescription is the one I'd arrived at myself, quite some time ago, the one that's the reason why I self-identify as "honkie" instead of "white," "goy" instead of "gentile," and so forth: The prescription is to acknowledge and confront our racist past, our systemic racism, and our own racist impulses. I would add that this is, in short, to take a lesson from Germany and South Africa, whose progress is a direct result of having done exactly that.
     
  15. seigezunt

    seigezunt Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I just finished my Halloween re-read of a favorite Steven King novel, this time Pet Sematary, and I'm jumping into the second Coda volume. I've also been dipping my reading toes into a re-read of Dune, God help me.

    I've also been reading This Was a Poet, a critical biography of Emily Dickinson, written in 1938, so it predates a lot of current scholarship and historical knowledge of the poet and her immediate circle (so nothing about the domestic drama playing out in her brother's marriage which would have a significant impact on the publication of her poems, and nary a whiff of the current assumption that she was in love with her sister-in-law), but it's written in an absolutely beautiful way, and is an excellent snapshot of the early years of Dickinson fandom.
     
  16. Reanok

    Reanok Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    A Tale of two cities by Charles Dickens
     
  17. Lonemagpie

    Lonemagpie Writer Admiral

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    Exactly correct. I did reply earlier, but relieved to see others got what I meant.
     
  18. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    I started with Brand New Day (546-551) back in 2014, and the last collection I read was The Gauntlet: The Complete Collection Vol. 2 (627-637, ASM Presents The Black Cat 1-4, Grim Hunt: The Kraven Saga). I had some pretty big gaps in my reading, so it took me a while to get that far.

    Back on Saturday I started They Eye of the World by Robert Jordan, the first book in The Wheel of Time series. There's no way in hell I'm gonna be done by the time the Amazon Prime series starts, but I'm gonna at least try to stay ahead of it.
     
  19. hbquikcomjamesl

    hbquikcomjamesl Commodore Commodore

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    Please don't be offended, but (as I re-read it; I'm just past the 2/3 point) the "time-travel treasure hunt" feels a bit like a walk-through of certain Infocom games (particularly The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy -- yes, younglings, in addition to books, radio and TV series, and a movie or two, it was also an Infocom game, and Douglas Adams himself collaborated with Infocom Implementer Steve Meretzky on it).
     
  20. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Premium Member

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    No offense taken, although I confess I'm not familiar with those games. (My video-game expertise pretty much ends at Solitaire and Hearts.) But scavenger-hunt plots, across time or space or whatever, are something of a staple. Just off the the top of my head, I immediately remember the Avengers and the Defenders spending the entire summer of 1973 competing to assemble the missing pieces of the Evil Eye before time ran out. And I vaguely remember the Justice League and the Justice Society chasing around after various objects of power in assorted old Silver Age comics.

    Heck, I'll cop to recently resorting to a scavenger-hunt plot for one of my LIBRARIANS novels as well. "We have to find the three missing chapters of Mother Goose's spellbook before the bad guys do!"