Human patient put in suspended animation for the first time

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Danja, Nov 20, 2019.

  1. Danja

    Danja Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Scientists (and sci-fi fans) have been talking about suspended animation for years. The idea that the functions of the human body can somehow be put on "pause" while life-saving medical procedures are performed (or a person is sent into space, a la Alien) has long seemed untenable -- until now. According to New Scientist, doctors have successfully placed humans in suspended animation for the first time, in a trial that could have an enormous influence on the future of emergency room surgery.

    https://news.yahoo.com/2019-11-20-human-patient-put-in-suspended-animation-for-the-first-time.html
     
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  2. StarCruiser

    StarCruiser Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Houston, we have a problem...
    That's the first step on a long road...
     
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  3. publiusr

    publiusr Vice Admiral Admiral

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    publiusr
    Biolation, as it is called today.

    Module
    https://www.universetoday.com/14405...-long-journeys-theyd-need-smaller-spacecraft/

    Now, what you have here is best called "human hibernation"
    https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2019/...y-cool-and-suspend-bodies-during-surgery.html

    True suspended animation would need vitrification, so as to avoid ice from forming into tiny molecular knives.

    The problem, ironically is oxygen. We need it for immediate respiration--but over time--it kills us. This s why we use anti-oxidants, after all--to fight biological rust. Oxygen and water are DNA's worst foes--and yet--we need both
    http://english.spbu.ru/news/3247-to...nd-water-and-there-is-nothing-we-can-do-about

    You need to remove as much from the body as you can--but flood it back instantly for reanimation to anything vitri-frozen.

    A book on the subject was written by Prehoda--but it is probably out of date.
    https://alcor.org/Library/html/RobertPrehoda.html
     
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  4. XCV330

    XCV330 Premium Member

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    It sounds interesting. seems like they don't know how long the process could last for, but since they need it for surgeries, they aren't pushing it.