News Discovery isn't on TV because no-one would watch it

Discussion in 'Star Trek: Discovery' started by Captain of the USS Averof, Nov 17, 2016.

  1. Guy Gardener

    Guy Gardener Fleet Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2000
    Location:
    In the lap of squalor I assure you.
    Tried to teach my mum to text a couple weeks ago.

    She still can't.

    That makes me a bad teacher, but since I did that, Mary Fucking Winchester back form the dead, and the 80s, figured out how to use a smart phone inbetween episodes of Supernatural.

    The primary reason all people of any age don't update their tech constantly is money.

    Money.

    Lies about it being too difficult to learn, is them saving face, giving their flip phone CPR every morning, dreaming about how their lives would change if only they had another $40 a month.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2016
  2. fireproof78

    fireproof78 Fleet Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    Location:
    Annoyed by inappropriate use of the word "Need"
    Scared of what now?
    I still have a VHS player, a DVD player and Apple TV. I don't need all the gadgets to make meet my entertainment needs.

    It's not a fear. It's a choice.
     
  3. Guy Gardener

    Guy Gardener Fleet Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2000
    Location:
    In the lap of squalor I assure you.
    I wasn't talking about you if you are not a dummy afraid of new technology, because I was specifically and narrowly talking about dummies afraid of new technology, who are a tiny niche group.

    Why did you think I was talking about you Fireproof?
     
  4. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Location:
    RJDiogenes of Boston
    Yeah, I meant like Comcast On Demand. Up until now, I hadn't really thought of how I would watch this show. I should be able to use my Kindle, though, if "Anytime, Anywhere, Any Device" is true.

    Dude, you're worse than me. And I'm pretty sure I'm older than you are.

    The one aspect of modern computer technology that my 75-year-old Mother has been able to grasp with no difficulty whatsoever is texting. It's a new way to gab. :rommie:
     
  5. Spot261

    Spot261 Vice Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2013
    Location:
    spot261
    When does it come out on Betamax?
     
  6. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Premium Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Location:
    Lancaster, PA
    Dare I admit I finally broke down and unplugged my VCR and bought a modern flat-screen TV just a few weeks ago? And now I need to figure out this whole "Netflix" thing in time to watch the GILMORE GIRLS revival.

    But to address your earlier point, it's not just about money; it's about the hassle and frustration if tech doesn't come natural to you. Yeah, I eventually got the new TV and Blu-Ray player working, but it took me two days, several trips to the electronic store to get the right kind of cables, a couple of calls to tech support, and a layer to stomach lining to get the whole set-up up and running, sort of. (I still haven't figured out how to turn the Closed-Captioning on with my new remote.)

    And that's been the way of it every time I have to adjust to some new piece of tech: be it email, Word, Track Changes, Skype . . .I have lost days of writing time trying to manage a "podcast' interview, so my attitude has always been "if ain't broke, don't fix it."

    But, yes, eventually you realize that you're losing work because you don't have an email address, or your editors hold a gun to your head and tell you that nobody uses red pencils anymore and you need to make revisions electronically from now on . . . . :)
     
  7. publiusr

    publiusr Vice Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    Location:
    publiusr
    This is why I'm glad we have public television. We'd never have Downton Abbey on cable--let alone rabbit ears.

    This isn't about just technology. When I see that Trolls made 10 times as much as Arrival--it sends my blood pressure through the roof.
     
  8. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Premium Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Location:
    Lancaster, PA
    Not sure those are aimed at the same audiences . . . :)

    Seriously, would you take a pack of little kids to ARRIVAL? And expect them to appreciate it?
     
  9. Spot261

    Spot261 Vice Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2013
    Location:
    spot261
    Apples and pears as pointed out. Movies aimed at kids tend to do spectacularly well for many reasons, not the least because typically kids watching the film require (ticket buying) attendant adults to accompany them.
     
  10. fireproof78

    fireproof78 Fleet Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    Location:
    Annoyed by inappropriate use of the word "Need"
    Whenever the "afraid of new tech" gets cited, I react. Having been called a "luddite" in the past due to not having a smart phone, Blu Ray, ect, causes it to be a bit of a sensitive topic. There are a variety of reasons I chose not to embrace several different newer technologies. Not a one of them has to do with fear.

    I apologize for the reaction, as I misread your post.
     
  11. Guy Gardener

    Guy Gardener Fleet Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2000
    Location:
    In the lap of squalor I assure you.
    Point is EVERYONE, even those fully jacked into the Future with one of those neckports from the matrix, can buy this shit on DVD in less than a year after it airs on CBS All Access.

    :)
     
  12. The Overlord

    The Overlord Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2010
    But tech is always changing, video tapes were being phased out by the 90s and records were being phased out by the 80s.

    I actually think broadcast TV is thing that will be phased out in 30 years. These streaming sites are far better, because you choose when you watch something, rather then having the TV schedule telling you when you should watch something, you set the schedule, rather then the TV. I also think Netflix is easy to use, you can set it up with an hour of effort and well not perfect, I prefer Netflix to broadcast TV. We don't have to worry about ratings or whether something is niche on a streaming site, Netflix and other streaming sites have been experimenting with content that wouldn't work on broadcast TV, but are still worth watching.

    The problem I have is Moonves having a dismissive attitude towards Star Trek and streaming, streaming is where the future is and this makes Moonves look like some corporate dinosaur who is afraid of change. He should see this as an opportunity to expand into new media, rather then it feeling like its shameful that Star Trek can't "cut it" next to the other pap CBS shows.
     
    CaptainDonovin likes this.
  13. CaptainDonovin

    CaptainDonovin Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2006
    Location:
    Labrador City. woof
    They have a point to an extent. Viewership wise it would be a failure compaired to the #s CBS is used to. The fact that Supergirl was on there a year is amazing but iirc it was going to be CW or cancelled for season two because of... ratings. It's been doing fine now because the show is better this year & CW is the right network for it.

    People would watch DSC but not to the extent that would make suits happy. But to say that & you happen to be a big whig at the network doesn't rank up there with the top ways to promote you're new show. If they're that unhappy with it quit dicking with the fans & pull it.
     
  14. fireproof78

    fireproof78 Fleet Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    Location:
    Annoyed by inappropriate use of the word "Need"
    Hollywood, in general, is afraid of change.
     
    CaptainDonovin likes this.
  15. CaptainDonovin

    CaptainDonovin Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2006
    Location:
    Labrador City. woof
    Well... records are clawing their way for a comeback, seems like every new alnum that comes out actually has an LP ALBUM as an option which I personally love. I just hope video tapes don't come back... at least records are thin.:bolian:
     
  16. johnjm22

    johnjm22 Captain Captain

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2013
    Location:
    California
    I don't know if broadcast TV will be completely phased out, but I agree streaming/on-demand will take up much more of the market share in the future.

    Look at how we currently consume music. You still have FM radio, but most people consume their music via on-demand services like Spotify, YouTube, Apple Music ect.

    I also think people don't always want on-demand. Some people occasionally like to turn on a channel/station and consume whatever comes on. You don't have to think about picking something out. Plus, there's a lot of content that people like to consume live like sports and news.
     
  17. jaime

    jaime Vice Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2013
    Location:
    London
    Hmm.
    You know most tech these days only has a plug that fits in the whole the same shape as the thing that goes in it? The menus can be a sod....but for your captioning....on your remote there's a button labelled with what looks like a screen (usually in fact an old rounded 4:3 crt screen at that) with little dots at the bottom that look vaguely like there's writing at the bottom of the screen (I.e this is what the designer thought subtitles on a screen look like when you shrink it to 3mm across. It's not bad...but it's not great.) that should turn the subtitles on and off. I have explained this to my Nan over the phone a few times now. Those symbols can be odd. Why remotes have a button dedicated to switching the sound to stereo is beyond me.
    Me...I miss CRT TV. I plugged my VCR back in because it's a better way to actually record stuff without dropping silly money and still being hamstrung. But for the most part, anyone who says they can't learn modern tech is lying either to themselves or whoever they say that too. Most tech now relies on the ability to read and poke with a finger, or at minimum recognise a symbol and poke. A trained chimp can do it. However...some people cannot be bothered, because they genuinely feel they don't need it or won't want it (sometimes true...sometimes not, especially if they are complaining there's nothing on TV but have refused every home video option back to and including the VCR) or because they are in some way scared. It's like the old 'the camera takes your soul' fear, except in the case of the Internet, google and facebook....they may have a point about the soul thing this time.
    The older people get, the more stubborn they become...especially boomers. The really old ones actually adapt to the tech faster...they lived through TV becoming a thing already, and they were waaaay more complex than the tech their children complain about.
     
  18. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Location:
    RJDiogenes of Boston
    I stopped using my VCR just a few months ago when the cleaning tape stopped doing any good. :rommie: And I still haven't delved into Netflix or Hulu (despite my Sister's demands to watch Stranger Things).

    Money's definitely a big part; I think the Blu Ray players are cheap, but the TVs are not. And for me a big part of it is the hassle-- not just setting up the new equipment, but getting rid of the old.

    I still do a lot of my writing on paper, but I've segued over to writing directly on the PC more than I ever thought I would.

    Vinyl records make great presents for my audiophile Brother-- and, as a bonus, it usually comes with a digital copy for me. :rommie:
     
    CaptainDonovin likes this.
  19. Guy Gardener

    Guy Gardener Fleet Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2000
    Location:
    In the lap of squalor I assure you.
    The Nielsens?

    How do we figure out when it is no longer representative of the viewing habits of America?

    They're being paid to watch TV.

    ($15 per month per family, what the ####?)

    I heard stories that new families got new tvs to go with their new digital decoder, which they may have had to return if they tried to leave the family...

    Neilsen families have a vested interest in continuing the illusion that their behaviour is honestly representation of 240 million Americans, or 50 million house holds, when it probably hasn't been for a while and the future approaches will continue to be even less so.
     
    Grendelsbayne likes this.
  20. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Premium Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Location:
    Lancaster, PA
    Like I said, a lot of it is "if ain't broke, don't fix it." If my twenty-year-old box TV is still working, and I can still watch SHARKNADO on it, why upgrade? I honestly didn't intend to replace said TV, which was still working, but then our ancient DVD player died and when I tried to replace it (and the VCR) with a Blu-Ray player, I discovered that that our old TV--with its one coaxial cable jack--just wasn't compatible with the new Blu-Ray player . . . .sigh, back to the the electronics store.

    And this stuff isn't always as user-friendly as you make out, especially if you don't know all the jargon. ("What the heck is an HDMI cable?") And sometimes you plug everything in, just the way the manual says, and . . . why don't I have sound? Why isn't my computer "recognizing" the new printer? Why am I suddenly getting subtitles in French?

    And when I call the tech support, the nice people on the other end of the line are often speaking in tongues:

    "Oh, you just have to re-fragmentize the central directory and download an updated app extension via the wireless infranet link . . . ."

    "Come again?"
     
    fireproof78 and Nyotarules like this.