Worst attempts at accents

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by Miss Chicken, Mar 22, 2012.

  1. The Borgified Corpse

    The Borgified Corpse Admiral Admiral

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    I disagree. Up until Casino Royale, I had no idea that Daniel Craig was British. I completely bought his American accent.

    And while I occasionally found some weird, slightly stilted pronunciations from Jill Valentine, I'd always chalked that up to bad acting, not a bad accent.
     
  2. firesoforion

    firesoforion Lieutenant Junior Grade Red Shirt

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    This is what I was going to say (all of them...), and it's even worse when they try to speak Russian, which for some reason, they always, always do...
     
  3. Mr. Laser Beam

    Mr. Laser Beam Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    You've been listening to Craig Ferguson standup comedy, haven't you? He says pretty much the same thing. ;)

    Ironically, Ferguson himself would have made a pretty good Scotty (though I can't find fault with Simon Pegg's performance).

    As for bad Kevin Costner accents: How about Thirteen Days? That was worse than Robin Hood! :barf:

    Another bad accent that springs to mind: Cary Elwes (an Englishman) playing a New Yorker when he was on SVU a few years ago. His accent faded in and out several times during the episode. OTOH, another Englishman - Linus Roache - plays HIS L&O character with an absolutely flawless NY accent (It sounds more authentic than Linus' real voice!). I think the problem for CE was that he was trying the New York accent, whereas I've heard him do a more generic American accent (such as in From the Earth to the Moon where he played astronaut Michael Collins) and it sounded much more believable.

    Interesting that Leonard Nimoy was mentioned, though: in one of his very first Trek lines ever, in 'The Cage', he suddenly lurches into a faux-Brit accent for one word ("CAHN'T be the screen, then!") and then never again. :lol:
     
  4. Forbin

    Forbin Admiral Admiral

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    Is Linda Thorsen English or Canadian? I recall an Avengers where Tara was undercover as an American, and she was really hitting the Rs way too hard.
     
  5. Canadave

    Canadave Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Huh, this never even occurred to me. I say "the States" fairly often, myself.
     
  6. Mr. Laser Beam

    Mr. Laser Beam Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Canadian.
     
  7. Disruptor

    Disruptor Commodore

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    Liam Neeson in NEXT OF KIN. A lot of people trying to do American southern or rural accents fail big time.

    Gary Oldman in AIR FORCE ONE. Like Liam, Oldman's so great we can enjoy it, but come on.

    I saw some of Captain Corelli's Mandolin once...lol.
     
  8. Alidar Jarok

    Alidar Jarok Everything in moderation but moderation Moderator

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    [yt]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pc3OyvbJkj4[/yt]

    ETA: I suppose I should articulate a point to my post. Mostly insight into the Kevin Costner thing, but I got reminded because someone mentioned Allan Rickman playing a German. I honestly just thought he was supposed to be a British leader of German terrorists. Some people are allowed to get away with not trying.
     
  9. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Well, Rickman's Die Hard character was named Hans Gruber, IIRC. But maybe he was a German who went to school in the UK, learned English there, and picked up the accent.
     
  10. pork3

    pork3 Commander

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    I consider that a blessing. Lived in Massachussetts for years, and that accent, to this day, can be grating. Ditto with the New York accent.

    -Jamman
     
  11. Collingwood Nick

    Collingwood Nick Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I thought it was meant to be German!
     
  12. Turtletrekker

    Turtletrekker Admiral Admiral

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    How about whatever it was that Halle Berry was trying to do in the first X-Men movie?
     
  13. Chris3123

    Chris3123 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    It was pretty cringeworthy, to me anyway.

    Wait, Linus Roache is English? Wow. He's good.
     
  14. scotpens

    scotpens Professional Geek Premium Member

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    More like “mockney.” Dick Van Dyke is a talented man, but I find it difficult to watch Mary Poppins today because of that ear-grating phony accent.

    In The Hunt for Red October, Connery played a Russian submarine commander with a Scottish accent!

    The character was Japanese, not Chinese. It was deliberately over-the-top and certainly not intended to offend anyone. Remember, this was more than 50 years ago.

    Link

    Many of us Yanks do, in fact, refer to our country as “the States” when we’re abroad.

    Vocabulary is a different matter than accent, but I’ve heard some hilarious clunkers in that area by British actors trying to sound American (and vice versa). In an episode of Fawlty Towers, a stereotypically loud, boorish American businessman says, “I’m gonna bust your ass!” Uh . . . you can bust someone in the face or in the chops or in the kisser, but you don’t bust another person’s ass. You bust your own ass working hard.

    And someone should tell hack British screenwriters that Americans don’t use “dear” to mean expensive. And that in the U.S., collective entities like corporations, universities, and organizations take singular verbs, not plural ones.

    The Sundowners (1960) is set in Australia with Australian characters — all played by English, Irish or Scottish actors. The Aussie accents range from passable to awful.
    That reminds me of Barbra Streisand in Hello, Dolly! She ranges from her Yiddish-inflected Fanny Brice in Funny Girl, to a Mae West impersonation, to a quasi-Southern accent — sometimes all in the same scene.
     
  15. Marc

    Marc Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    which brings up to Meryl Streep's infamous "the dingo's got my baby" from Evil Angels.

    Dunno how it was for the rest of the film but if that one scene was a general indication....
     
  16. Gov Kodos

    Gov Kodos Admiral Admiral

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    All great examples, but Hunt for Red October should also include honorary mention to Gates McFadden as Jack's wife. She's supposed to be English and can't give her two lines in character.
     
  17. CorporalCaptain

    CorporalCaptain Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    I think Patrick Stewart's French accent in Star Trek: The Next Generation sounded very British. ;)
     
  18. Turtletrekker

    Turtletrekker Admiral Admiral

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    Ha!

    That reminds me of my favorite description of "The Big Goodbye"-- An Englishman playing a Frenchman playing an American on the holo-deck. :lol:
     
  19. propita

    propita Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Then there's Connery in "The Wind and the Lion." He plays a Berber. With a Scots accent. Doesn't even try to hide/change it. Doesn't matter, he was magnificent in it.

    Russian accent? Brian Keith did a great job in "Meteor," but then he spoke Russian in real life. I always liked him. I fondly remember "Family Affair" and "The Parent Trap."
     
  20. Miss Chicken

    Miss Chicken Little three legged cat with attitude Admiral

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    I excuse that by saying we have no idea what a French accent will sound like in 350 years time.