turbo lifts

Discussion in 'Trek Tech' started by trekyourself, May 31, 2016.

  1. trekyourself

    trekyourself Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Location:
    Alberta Canada
    I appologize if hat has been brought up before, but I'm a little confused about the turbo lifts, the little handles they grab on to... the sticks coming out of the walls. Do they actually serve a technical purpose or are they more for decoration?
     
  2. DonIago

    DonIago Vice Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2001
    Location:
    Burlington, VT, USA
    I'm not sure how rigidly this was enforced during TOS, but at least in "Trials and Tribbleations" it's shown that you turn the handle to activate the turbolift. Turn handle, state destination.
     
    trekyourself likes this.
  3. trekyourself

    trekyourself Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Location:
    Alberta Canada
    I feel like with the complexity of there computer the turn handle part seems a tad unnecessary lol. Since we don't even need that nowadays. But hank you for answering!
     
  4. danellis

    danellis Commander Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2010
    Location:
    UK
    Did real world '50s or '60s elevators have anything similar?

    I've always assumed that they were some kind of analogy of real world technology that had been made redundant by the time I came along in the eighties.

    dJE
     
    trekyourself likes this.
  5. SWHouston

    SWHouston Commander Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2010
    Location:
    Houston, Tx. U.S.A.
    They're kind of like a throttle on a Motorcycle.
    CW to go up, and CCW to go down, and the farther you twist it the faster you go. :p
     
  6. Timo

    Timo Fleet Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2003
    Perhaps you want a safety switch on an elevator that takes verbal commands. You know, "Remember that last game of BRIDGE -oops!" or "Made me want to toss it OUT OF THE NEAREST AIRLOCK -uh-oh...". It's plenty embarrassing enough for your phone to pick up the "I sure hope my WIFE never learns about you"!

    There are plenty of times our TOS heroes use the cab without issuing any verbal commands, too. Might be the cabs run on preset routes as default, and the handle tells the cab when a user wants to step out, either as he releases it, or through him originally twisting the handle the right number of quiet clicks, or whatnot.

    Timo Saloniemi
     
    Richard Baker and trekyourself like this.
  7. scotpens

    scotpens Professional Geek Premium Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2009
    Location:
    The Left Coast
    The only real-world example I can think of is old-style manually operated elevators -- and those were being replaced by self-service pushbutton elevators as early as the 1930s.
     
  8. Go-Captain

    Go-Captain Captain Captain

    Joined:
    May 23, 2015
    I figured it was like a minimal safety system against rapid movement. Only one person needs to twist a handle for a destination to be entered, but each occupant needs to hold a handle, even if untwisted, in order to prevent being thrown off balance in case of unforeseen movement. I don't know if they always all held the handles, but there is at least once instance where it looked like it came in handy.

    In the scene below, Kirk feels the elevator is in free fall, so we have an implication of no inertial dampeners as in a TNG turbo lift.

     
  9. Go-Captain

    Go-Captain Captain Captain

    Joined:
    May 23, 2015
    I figured it was like a minimal safety system against rapid movement. Only one person needs to twist a handle for a destination to be entered, but each occupant needs to hold a handle, even if untwisted, in order to prevent being thrown off balance in case of unforeseen movement. I don't know if they always all held the handles, but there is at least once instance where it looked like it came in handy.

    In the scene below, Kirk feels the elevator is in free fall, so we have an implication of no inertial dampeners as in a TNG turbo lift.

     
  10. Timo

    Timo Fleet Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2003
    ...Now that's an interesting issue. Do our heroes really feel something - or do they both happen to glance at the indicator lights at the same time (Kirk with the corner of his eye, Spock head on)? It doesn't look as if either of them actually feels anything, as their simultaneous realization does not coincide with the onset of the fall as indicated by thy lights!

    Also, it doesn't look like freefall for our heroes - they aren't floating or anything. But it might still amount to them feeling lighter than usual, if not for the timing issue. And when they stop the fall, that really looks as if there's full inertia control at play!

    Timo Saloniemi
     
  11. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Location:
    North Wales
    Not to mention that after Kirk overrides the freefall (which lasts quite a while) they arrive at their destination the Bridge in mere seconds.

    It's my guess that "freefall" is not actually a falling motion of any kind, just that the turbolift car has become disconnected from the mag-rails (or whatever) that secure it to the sides of the shaft. Fortunately it is a zero-g environment in the turboshafts, but the potential for rapid, uncontrolled movement is still possible, hence the danger
     
    Galileo7 likes this.
  12. Timo

    Timo Fleet Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2003
    ...Never compensating for the number of indicator lights that moved the other way. Another nail in the coffin that they would be actual lights on shaft walls, I guess. Although one never knows about the alternate routes the lifts might take, perhaps along shafts with a different density of lights...

    In any case, the route here is just as curious/nonsensical as always, the lift first going down (Spock sees the lights do the appropriate direction and is not worried), but going too fast (this gets the two worried), then going back up, then going sideways, and supposedly stopping. Back of the saucer, calling for one deck down plus lots of sideways, but with a Redjac-imposed drop down the connecting dorsal first? Yet the final ascent to bridge is missing.

    Timo Saloniemi
     
    Galileo7 likes this.
  13. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Location:
    North Wales
    I think that there's really no chance that the "light strips" are actually physical lights on the inside of the the turboshaft. At the speed they pass the supposed window you'd have no more than one per deck, and there simply aren't enough decks on board to correspond with many of the turbolift scenes we saw throughout TOS.

    They make a lot more sense as general "direction indicators" and as we saw in Wolf In The Fold also double as indicators to alert the passengers when the turbocar isn't behaving as it should.