The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Not familiar offhand, but I found him pretty underwhelming as the villain here.

    Police Squad!?

    That's what I thought, though I was trying to give them benefit of the doubt.

    They did...foreshadowing didn't make my summary. It was exposition so conspicuous that you knew they were setting something up with it.

    I dunno...it was very successful while it lasted.

    Cant agree with that rule for band names ending in "S". It sounds completely wrong to say, for example, "The Beatles is awesome." For Buffalo Springfield, I want to treat the name singular when used without the definite article; but when the sometimes-used "the" is present, it tips things into sounding better plural.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2022
  2. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Interesting. I think he was on just about every TV show that existed back in the day.

    Yep, you Capped it. :rommie:

    Ah, okay, good for them.

    Yeah, it was the most successful stuff that was the worst, in my opinion-- Saturday Night Fever and everything after that. I think the last Bee Gees stuff I liked was "Jive Talkin'" or "Edge of the Universe" or thereabouts.

    That's exactly what I meant by plural sounding better. It basically comes down to whatever sounds right-- or less awkward. :rommie:
     
  3. Nerys Myk

    Nerys Myk Garth of Algar Premium Member

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    The Whos? ;)
     
  4. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    Wild Wild Catch-Up Viewing--IN COLOR!

    _______

    WWWs2e01.jpg
    "The Night of the Eccentrics"
    Originally aired September 16, 1966
    Season 2 premiere
    Agent Vance Markham (Roy Jenson) is caught sneaking into a warehouse hideout of Count Carlos Manzeppi (Victor Buono) and his sideshow-themed underlings, who include a ventriloquist named Villar (Richard Pryor!). Jim and Artie go in after Markham only for Artie to get briefly hung in a noose trap, following which the agents find Markham dead with a poster for an amusement park knifed to his back and are taunted by Manzeppi's voice. In a briefing with Colonel Armstrong (Harry Ellerbe) at the hospital where Artie's laid up afterward, we learn of how a group of hired assassins called the Eccentrics is believed to be after President Juarez.

    Jim proceeds to the park, where he becomes acquainted with the Count and his crew, who include a gunslinger named Deadeye (Anthony Eisley), knife-thrower Tony (Paul Wallace), harem-outfitted Miranda (Le Grand Mellon), strongman Titan (Mike Masters), and the ventriloquist, who always talks through his dummy, Julio. West bests Titan in a tussle, following which Deadeye shoots the loser. Jim is then transported to an underground lair via a trap door hidden by a puff of smoke, and is treated to various parlor tricks. The Count does the all-too-frequent schtick of propositioning Jim to join the Eccentrics, but wants him to prove his loyalty by killing Artie. Then, while showing a series of color slides(!), the Count describes how he plans to have Juarez killed and replace him with an archduke heir of the deceased Emperor Maximillian who's under his thumb. Jim is subsequently trap-doored into a pit, from which he escapes with the helped of a concealed grappling hook and Miranda popping in via a hidden panel. The Count watches their departure via color TV(!!!).

    The duo return to the train, but are followed by the Count and his Eccentrics. Now the Count says that he wants West to seem to kill Juarez to make it look like the archduke has the blessing of the US. After Artie uses some train trickery to escape, Jim is taken back to the Count's lair and left in an electrical death trap that Miranda helps him out of, motivated by the prospect of getting a reward from the government. They proceed to Juarez's palace to be met by Artie disguised as a guard, but as Jim's attempting to warn Juarez (Frank Sorello), the Eccentrics enter and "Juarez" is unmasked to reveal Deadeye.

    After Tony is shot by Deadeye over West tricking him into aiding in an escape attempt, Jim taunts Deadeye into a shootout and wins. Now finding himself at a disadvantage against an armed West, the Count departs through a secret panel with Villar, following which the real Juarez returns. In the coda, Artie can't find the panel, but we see the Count reach through a hidden opening behind another shelf to replace a portrait of Juarez with one of himself.

    If you're confused as to exactly what the Count wanted Jim to do for him, so was I. I read that they intended for the Count to be another recurring villain, but he only appears in one more episode, later this season. This one seemed to more about introducing him and his M.O. than having him involved in a substantial plot.

    I don't know if Pryor was actually doing ventriloquism, but what he did looked like it's supposed to--there were visible mouth movements if you looked for them, but he didn't get in the way of focusing on the dummy.

    _______

    I have a softer, childhood nostalgia-fueled spot for disco. When I was populating that era in my collection, I was buying singles they wrote and produced for other artists (most notably brother Andy), because they sounded like de facto Bee Gees singles.

    The Whose. :D

    _______

    Today we lost Tony Dow (prematurely announced yesterday), but Norman Lear turned 100!
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2022
  5. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    King Tut, needless to say. I also saw him recently as a pretentious artist on Perry Mason recently. He does pretentious very well. :rommie:

    I love circus and carnival stories.

    That's pretty cool.

    That seems pretty extreme for prime time.

    Talk about the real name being better than the character name. :rommie:

    I wonder if he's an ancestor of that guy in Soap. :rommie:

    The Count likes trap doors a lot.

    Like Batman, Wild Wild West made good use of color. :rommie:

    Not a trap door?

    Interesting. I wonder why that didn't work out? Isn't this the second time they introduced a recurring villain that didn't recur?

    These episodes are so chock full of twists and turns that a plot hardly matters. :rommie:

    I don't think I recall him ever using ventriloquism in his act.

    I've kind of mellowed on some of it. The last time I heard "Night Fever," I didn't even change the station. But it led to Top 40 getting really bad until New Wave came along to liven things up.

    And Tony Dow was only 77. Some people get a raw deal.

    The Who - Who Are Next? :rommie:
     
  6. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    Wild Wild Catch-Up Viewing

    _______

    WWWs2e02.jpg
    "The Night of the Golden Cobra"
    Originally aired September 23, 1966
    The episode opens with Conrad shirtless, as Jim is practicing unarmed against a sword-wielding Artie in Asian-looking armor. They receive a notification of a presidential citation in New Orleans via a carrier pigeon message in invisible ink, only for those plans to be interrupted by an assignment via telegraph (while the train is underway). Jim meets Territorial Indian Commissioner Col. Stanton Mayo (Simon Scott) on horseback, only for the two of them to be attacked by a pair of lance-wielding horsemen. Jim goes Indy on their asses, but is bitten by a cobra directed by a nearby snake charmer (Morgan Farley).

    Having been spared the deadly effects of the venom by the charmer, Mudjaz, Jim wakes up in the palace of a maharajah who, while staying in the U.S., goes simply by the name of Mr. Singh (Boris Karloff!). Singh introduces West to the three tough-looking sons whom he wants tutored: Chandra (James Westmoreland), Gupta (Michael York), and Sarrkan (John Alonzo). Singh maneuvers West into giving his first demonstration by having his sons threaten West with sabers, and Jim bluffs them by convincing them that a box of matches actually contains a volatile explosive in order to make a break. Singh's harem-clad daughter, Veda (Audrey Dalton), takes Jim to the hidden room where the wounded Col. Mayo is being kept. Jim blows the door with a skeleton key that leaves an explosive tip in the lock, only for Veda to knock him out with a blow dart.

    After Jim wakes up in a cell, Veda is snuck in via snake basket, claiming that she was trying to save him from her brothers before, and intends to help him escape for real this time. After getting into why marrying Jim would be impractical, the two kiss, while Singh watches from outside with delight. Meanwhile, back at the colonel's office, a local guide called John Mountain-Top (Jose De Vega) has told a bored Artie about a haunted castle nearby. Artie rides to the vicinity, where he's met outside by Veda, who's walking a leopard.

    Back at the palace, Jim is being entertained in the main hall by Singh when a familiar-looking, OTT-acting magician enters to perform the Indian rope trick. The rope rises, and both agents climb up it to a balcony overlooking from the floor above. Veda shows them a secret exit through a cellar to a pair of horses....but Jim borrows Artie's small, concealed gun, wanting to go back up to take care of unfinished business. He ends up falling through a trap door out to a courtyard where the brothers play polo with West as the goal. He overcomes the three of them, then returns to the palace to ask Singh where Col. Mayo is. The colonel enters...holding a gun on West.

    The Colonel explains their plan to have West help persuade the local Pawnees, with whom Jim holds special status from some previous affair, to leave their provisional reservation because something valuable has been discovered there. Artie and Veda are brought in by guards who turn out to be answering to the colonel, against Singh's wishes. The treasure turns out to be black gold...Texas tea...and Singh and Mayo end up killing each other, the latter falling into an oil well in a cellar chamber.

    In the train coda, Jim and Artie open a crate sent from Veda as a gift, which contains a pair of leopards--a baby and an unseen mama.

    WWW had some pretty snazzy guests...Trek never got Boris Karloff or Richard Pryor!

    _______

    I'd have included a screenshot, but there's a good one on the episode's IMDb page.

    I wonder if the train has a Giant Gaslit Lucite Map of the Foggy San Francisco Docks...?

    No, a secret panel behind a bookshelf.

    I don't recall another one offhand, and if there was one, wouldn't be sure if it was before or after this point, as I've watched most of seasons 1, 3, and 4 out of sync.

    It helps if the twists and turns have some sort of plot to hang them on. Here nothing really seemed to happen in the episode...it was all about the villain showing off for West.

    Also, Monkees co-creator Bob Rafelson died on Saturday at the age of 89.

    Or is that "Who's" possessive rather than a contraction?
     
  7. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Free the nipple!

    "You have been Granted a presidential citation. Haha. See what we did there?"

    That happened before. Did we decide that they can get telegraphs through the rails or something?

    Whoa. Nice.

    Logan 5.

    Technically true.

    Uh uh. Once bitten, twice shy.

    Well, that's pretty kinky, but a better plan than Victor Buono had.

    I assume this guide must be in on the plan, but that's kind of odd considering he's an Indian.

    This is why Artie is embarrassed when he has to use force. :rommie:

    He's not going to let Singh hold the Mayo.

    Artie needs to invent a trap door detector.

    Okay, this makes sense by itself, but I don't understand how it connects to Singh's originally stated plan for Jim to train his kids.

    There we go. We haven't had a good falling to death in a while.

    True. I would love to have seen them on Trek. Someday, when CGI and deepfake and such things have progressed far enough, we'll get more TOS with more cool guest stars.

    Snazzy. :rommie:

    It would be cool if the train had a room with 3D table maps-- like a train set inside the train.

    Hmm. Maybe I'll think of it.

    RIP, Bob Rafelson.

    The Next of the Who. :rommie:
     
  8. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    You proposed it; I scoffed.

    I didn't get the impression that he was; and Veda was out of the loop anyway.

    Too early for that...

    Nor did I.

    More of a drowning. Guess you could say it was a pool or reservoir of oil; a wooden hatch with the oil directly underneath.

    The show's Wiki page had a list of recurring characters, there wasn't another two-time villain. Maybe there was a one-timer who got away and gave the impression he'd return.

    Read something else of interest there...WWW was canceled because it was routinely cited as one of the most violent shows on television. There was a crackdown going on at the end of the decade, and the network sacrificed it.
     
  9. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Bruce Lansbury, brother of Angela, agrees. According to the 'Mission: Impossible Dossier', Lansbury says, "It was a sacrificial lamb. It went off with a thirty-two or thirty-three share which in those days was virtually break-even, but it always won its time period."

    Lansbury produced 'WWW' for three years until it was canceled. Its cancelation and the abrupt departure of 'M:I' producer Stanley Kallis, who left midway through the fourth year to oversee 'Hawaii Five-O', opened the door for Lansbury to step in as producer. Lansbury would produce the remainder of the fourth season, all the fifth season and half of the sixth season before being promoted to Vice President of Paramount Pictures Creative Affairs.

    I've read an interview somewhere with Robert Conrad, who said that even if 'WWW' weren't canceled, the next season would have been its last. Conrad did most of his own stunts and it was taking a toll on his body. There were also concerns about Ross Martin's health, as he had suffered a major heart attack during the filming of the last season and missed several episodes while he was in the hospital recovering.
     
  10. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Oh, right. :rommie:

    Never too early. :rommie:

    That must have been it. TrekBBS search utility has not been much help.

    That's funny, because it won't be long before things become even more violent.

    Ah, yes, the Substitute Arties (who were actually pretty cool). There probably would have been more of that in season four.
     
  11. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Finally found the passage I was looking for in the 'M:I' book.

    CBS's censorship wing, the Standards and Practices Department, never complained, even when the industry was reeling from an antiviolence backlash. Says (William Read) Woodfield, "After Bobby Kennedy was assassinated in 1968, Mike Dann called a meeting of all the people who had programs on CBS. It was a big anti-violence discussion. Then he said, 'By the way, I want to meet the Mission: Impossible people in Perry's office." Mike said, "I want you to know that what we're saying does not apply to you people. We're not really talking about you guys."
    Woodfield briefed Dann about their latest plot, which took place largely in a gas chamber (Ep. 56 - The Execution). "Mike said, 'Oh, that's fine.' It was pretend violence, you see? We weren't doing violence."

    So, CBS cancelled 'WWW' because they think it's real violence, while they keep 'M:I' because it's pretend. Does that make any sense? Which is more real and which is pretend?
     
  12. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    55 Years Ago This Week

    July 30
    • Rioting began in Milwaukee and would lead to a shutdown of city services for 10 days. The violence was brought under control within three days.
    • George Harrison and Pattie Boyd return to England from Greece.

    July 31
    • Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones had their jail sentences revised on appeal by a three-member appeals tribunal led by the Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, Lord Parker. On June 29, Jagger had been sentenced three months imprisonment, and Richards to a year, after being convicted of possession of pep pills and marijuana respectively. "If you keep out of any trouble for the next 12 months", Lord Parker told Jagger, "what has happened will not be on your record as a conviction." Richards was not present, due to illness, but also received a suspended sentence and probation.
    • John, Cynthia, and Julian Lennon, Paul McCartney, and Jane Asher return to London Airport from Greece.

    August 1
    • The U.S. State Department lifted restrictions on American travel to Algeria, Libya and the Sudan, imposed after the Six-Day War, but still limited travel to Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Iraq and Yemen.
    • After its construction at the Pullman Company yards in Chicago, the UAC TurboTrain was sent eastward on August 1, 1967, at regular speed and without passengers, to Providence, Rhode Island in order for UAC Aircraft Systems engineers to tear it down, study it for further development, and then eventual high-speed testing on a specially-built track between Trenton and New Brunswick, New Jersey.
    • George and Pattie fly from London Airport to Los Angeles, renting a house in a street named Blue Jay Way, which inspires George to write his song of the same name.

    August 2
    • Israel issued IDF Order Number 82, canceling municipal council elections that had been scheduled in the Palestinian towns of the West Bank prior to its capture from Jordan. The four-year terms of all of the members who had been elected in 1963 were extended indefinitely. Elections would finally be held on March 28, 1972 in the cities of Nablus, Jenin, Tulkarm, Qalqilya and Jericho (Ariha); and in Ramallah, Bethlehem and Hebron on May 2, 1972.
    • The movie In the Heat of the Night, starring Sidney Poitier, is released, and is later named the best picture of the year.
    • The Turkish football club Trabzonspor is established in Trabzon.

    August 3
    • U.S. President Johnson asked Congress to temporarily increase individual and corporate income taxes by 10 percent for the 1968 tax year. He also announced that he had approved sending an additional 45,000 American troops to fight in the Vietnam War before June 30, 1968, bringing the total number of U.S. personnel in South Vietnam to more than half a million.
    • George Harrsion and Ravi Shankar hold a press conference promoting Shankar's Hollywood Bowl concert set for the following day.

    August 4 – NASA named its sixth group of astronauts, with 11 men, seven of whom would be launched on American space shuttle missions. Joseph P. Allen and William B. Lenoir would be the first to go into space, on board the fifth space shuttle mission on the Columbia 15 years later, on November 11, 1982. Story Musgrave would be sent on six shuttle spaceflights between 1983 and 1996, starting with STS-6. The other four would be William E. Thornton (STS-8), Robert A. Parker (STS-9), Anthony W. England and Karl Gordon Henize, both on STS-51-F.

    August 5
    • For the first time, almost all of the American Football League and the National Football League played against each other, as part of a series of 16 interleague preseason football games. In the opening game, a team from the AFL defeated an NFL team for the first time, as the Denver Broncos upset the Detroit Lions, 13 to 7. All of the AFL teams, and 12 of the 16 from the NFL, played in the series. The exceptions were the Packers (who had played the first NFL-AFL game when they beat the Chiefs in the Super Bowl), the Cardinals, the Giants, and the Browns.
    • The World Boxing Association began a single-elimination tournament to fill the heavyweight boxing title that it had taken away from Muhammad Ali, starting with two quarterfinal bouts at the Houston Astrodome.
    • Pink Floyd released their first album, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, in the United Kingdom.


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Ain't No Mountain High Enough," Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell (12 weeks)
    • "Alfie," Dionne Warwick (17 weeks)
    • "Let's Live for Today," The Grass Roots (12 weeks)
    • "Step Out of Your Mind," The American Breed (9 weeks)
    • "The Tracks of My Tears," Johnny Rivers (9 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Heroes and Villains," The Beach Boys

    (#12 US; #8 UK)

    "San Franciscan Nights," Eric Burdon & The Animals

    (#9 US; #7 UK)

    "Funky Broadway," Wilson Pickett

    (#8 US; #1 R&B; #43 UK)

    "Ode to Billie Joe," Bobbie Gentry

    (#1 US the weeks of Aug. 26 through Sept. 16, 1967; #7 AC; #17 Country; #8 R&B; #412 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time [2004])


    And new on the boob tube:
    • The Saint, "The Art Collectors"

    _______

    Timeline entries are quoted from the Wiki pages for the month or year and Mark Lewisohn's The Beatles Day by Day, with minor editing as needed.

    _______

    The show's Wiki page seemed to be drawing from the same sources.

    Which, as came up when I was watching that season, would probably make a lot more sense if one watched the episodes in production order than the big, nonsensical mess it was in airdate order.

    I get what they're saying...it's really all pretend, but on M:I, they're faking out the bad guys, so a lot of the seeming violence is fictitious within the fiction of the show. M:I wasn't about fisticuffs and gunplay. And when they maneuvered the bad guys into offing each other, it was implied, such as with the trusty old sound of gunshots coming from offscreen (a device employed frequently enough that it's become a running gag here).
     
  13. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Lennon and McCartney would add their vocals to The Rolling Stones upcoming single, "We Love You" which opens with the sounds of entry into jail, and a cell door clanging shut.

    In a show of support Pete Townshend of The Who said, prior to Jagger and Richards sentencing, that until Jagger and Richards were released from jail, The Who would record nothing but Rolling Stones songs. Their next single would be a cover of The Rolling Stones 'The Last Time' b/w 'Under My Thumb'.
     
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  14. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    I'm not even going to begin to discuss the song that is 'Heroes and Villains', there's just too much to unpack. I would suggest going to the Wikipedia page and look up the entry on the song.

    I have 'The SMiLE Sessions' box set and they devote one CD to all the various versions that Brian Wilson recorded in his attempt to capture what was in his head. They're so much better than what was finally released. Having said that, even amongst all those fragments, there's no way that it was going to be the hit that 'Good Vibrations' was.
     
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  15. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    This is one of the big problems with censorship: The subjectivity. They probably reasoned that kids were more likely to copy fistfights than trick their enemies into killing each other. :rommie:

    "Be seeing you," added the judge.

    "Due to illness." Mm-hmm. :rommie:

    Stone Cold Classic.

    But they had a harder time filling his shoes.

    This is a good one.

    Brought to you by the San Francisco Tourism Board.

    Sounds nice, but just like a million other songs.

    A weird and creepy Classic.

    Indeed. One good thing about arc-based storytelling is that you can't air them out of order. :rommie:

    "Wait for it... there it is... okay, let's grab some lunch." :rommie:
     
  16. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    50 Years Ago This Week

    July 30 – The Associated Press and the Chinese government controlled Xinhua News Agency reached an agreement to regularly exchange news and photos, marking the first time in 22 years that any American news agency would have a channel with the People's Republic of China.

    July 31
    • Operation Motorman began at 4:00 in the morning, as 13,000 British troops rolled into the "no go" areas of Belfast, Derry, Lurgan, Armagh, Portadown, Coalisland and Dungannon. At 7:00, administrator William Whitelaw announced, "The British army are now in occupation and control throughout Northern Ireland." Although violence continued in Northern Ireland, it was greatly reduced and never again reached the levels of July 1972. The number of shooting incidents in the three weeks before the operation had been 2,595. In the three weeks that followed, the number dropped to 380.
    • Nine civilians were killed in the Claudy bombing in the Northern Ireland village of Claudy in County Londonderry, when three separate car bombs exploded without warning at about 10:30 in the morning on the main street. The event would later become known as "Bloody Monday"
    • Delta Airlines Flight 841 from Detroit was hijacked by five members of the Black Liberation Army as it was approaching Miami. After receiving $1,000,000 ransom, the 86 hostage/passengers were released and the hijackers commandeered the plane to Boston, and then flew 5,000 miles to Algeria. Four of the hijackers were captured and convicted in 1976, while the elusive fifth, George Wright (who identified himself on the passenger manifest as "Rev. L. Burgess") was on the run for the next 39 years. Wright was finally found and arrested in Lisbon, Portugal, on September 26, 2011.

    August 1 – "Bug Suspect Got Campaign Funds", the first article in the famous Watergate investigative series by reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, appeared on the front page of the Washington Post.

    August 3 – By an 88–2 vote, the U.S. Senate ratified the Soviet-American Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty. Voting against the treaty were Senators James Buckley (R-N.Y.) and James B. Allen (D-Ala.).

    August 4
    • At 0620 GMT (2:20 a.m. EDT), the Sun released the most powerful blasts of radiation that had been recorded up to that time.
    • Arthur Bremer, 22, was sentenced to 63 years in prison after being found guilty of having wounded Alabama Governor George C. Wallace and three other people in May. Bremer would be released from the Maryland Correctional Institution - Hagerstown on November 9, 2007, after 35 years.
    • Bobby Fischer reached his highest live ELO rating of 2789.7 (if the forfeited Game 2 is not counted toward change of his ELO rating) after a win in Game 10 of World Chess Championship 1972. This highest live ELO rating was not surpassed for almost 22 years.

    August 5 – With its national convention adjourned, the Democratic National Committee confirmed George McGovern's sixth choice to replace Thomas Eagleton, former Ambassador to France (and Peace Corps founder Sargent Shriver as the party's nominee for Vice-President. McGovern was turned down by Teddy Kennedy, Abraham Ribicoff, Hubert Humphrey, Reuben Askew and Edmund Muskie.


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "The Candy Man," Sammy Davis, Jr. w/ The Mike Curb Congregation (21 weeks)
    • "Mary Had a Little Lamb" / "Little Woman Love", Wings (7 weeks)
    • "Song Sung Blue," Neil Diamond (13 weeks)
    • "Superwoman (Where Were You When I Needed You)," Stevie Wonder (11 weeks)
    • "Troglodyte (Cave Man)," The Jimmy Castor Bunch (12 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Speak to the Sky," Rick Springfield

    (#14 US; #16 AC; I'd try to beat RJ to a recurring gag, but the point is rather moot)

    "Saturday in the Park," Chicago

    (#3 US; #8 AC)

    "Nights in White Satin," The Moody Blues

    (#2 US; #37 AC; #9 UK; bubbled under when originally released in 1967)

    "Ben," Michael Jackson

    (#1 US the week of Oct. 14, 1972; #3 AC; #8 R&B; #7 UK)

    "My Ding-a-Ling," Chuck Berry

    (#1 US the weeks of Oct. 21 and 28, 1972; #42 R&B; #1 UK)

    _______

    Timeline entries are quoted from the Wiki pages for the month or year.

    _______

    Ah, I didn't know that about the intro.

    :D

    :techman:

    Cinematic Special from four years ago here. Seems like just yesterday that I was weighing whether posting the Mister Tibbs clip would be kosher...

    In that comment you would have scored, if making a rhyme you hadn't ignored.

    In my book, their last one before they start smelling like has-beens.

    Cute intro.

    I distinctly remember this one sticking around well into when I started doing the weekly playlists.

    Very evocatively atmospheric and enigmatic.

    :lol:
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2022
  17. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    "In the Heat of the Night" is one of those movies that I'll stop and watch, no matter at what point the movie is. It has so many little beats that you end up picking up on that you missed the first time, and a good cast of solid character actors.

    The two sequels, "They Call Me Mr. Tibbs!" and, "The Organization" do nothing to tarnish its legacy; and "Mr. Tibbs" has Martin Landau in a solid supporting role.

    Unfortunately, the two sequels lean somewhat into blacksploitation territory, even though that era of films is still a few years away.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2022
    RJDiogenes likes this.
  18. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Location:
    RJDiogenes of Boston
    I suppose everybody has heard by now that Nichelle Nichols has died. Another childhood friend lost. Having dealt with dementia in real life over the past few years, I think this is the best thing for her, but it's still very sad. I hope that she, like my other friend, died contentedly and peacefully in her sleep. RIP, Nichelle. :(

    Amazing. I wonder how long his cool million lasted.

    Another Saturday night and he ain't got nobody. :(

    Now I'm left mute. :rommie: I didn't know that Rick Springfield even existed in 1972, let alone that he sang little spiritual ditties.

    Classic Chicago.

    Classic Poetry Rock.

    I remember this mainly from Lost 45s.

    Oh, man. :rommie:

    Strange days indeed....

    Damn, that's true. Good one. :rommie:
     
  19. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2015
    Location:
    Bothell, WA
    If I'm remembering correctly, the reason 'Nights . . .' charted again was because of a radio station here in Seattle.

    One of the overnight DJs would play the song to end his shift. It was simply the longest song he could find in his stack of records and he would play while he took a smoke/bathroom break while the other DJs would come in and set up for the day.

    At least that's the story Graeme Edge told when the Moody's came to town and he was interviewed on the station that started it all.
     
  20. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    The Old Mixer, Somewhere in Connecticut
    _______

    Wild Wild Catch-Up Viewing

    _______

    WWWs2e03.jpg
    "The Night of the Raven"
    Originally aired September 30, 1966
    Motivated to preserve a peace treaty, West promises Blackfoot chief War Eagle (Howard Hoffman) to return his daughter, Princess Wanakee, having received a telegram from her kidnapper asking specifically for Jim and Artie. The agents ride into Gravetown to find themselves surrounded by the armed posse of Sheriff Loveless. After their host indulges in some vague boasting, the agents allow themselves to be locked up for the princess's safety, then take the first opportunity to escape their cell with the help of a miniature blowtorch assembled from parts hidden in Jim's boot heel. They proceed to the dilapidated-looking house serving as Loveless's residence, where Jim enters an open window to find himself trapped when a metal shutter with a taunting message on the inside closes over it.

    The agents are taken to Wanakee (Phyllis Newman), who's staying in a teepee set up in a room with a fake outdoor backdrop. After an escape attempt is foiled by a gun to the princess's head, Jim gives his word not to attempt another. Meanwhile, Loveless prepares a cigar with a special white powder that he boasts of to Antoinette (Phoebe Dorin in her fifth appearance in the recurring role), both characters keeping the details of what it does a mystery for the audience's sake. Loveless pays West a visit and offers him the cigar, which Jim enjoys until it starts to affect him, knocking him out.

    Jim wakes up in a bed to find himself the size of a doll. We see that it's not a trick when Loveless visits to put West (or rather, his actual doll stunt double) into an animal crate with the also-miniaturized Wanakee, and leaves them guarded by a cat. Later they're brought to dinner, sitting at a miniature table at the end of the regular one, and treated to a performance of "Sloop John B" by Loveless and Antoinette at a harpsichord. (I read that Dunn was hired when a producer caught him and Dorin in a nightclub act, hence their singing in each appearance.) Artie is dumbfounded to see what's become of his partner.

    Back in the crate, West gets out through a relatively large opening and makes his way to the floor, then ducks into a mouse hole to elude the cat. After dodging an eight-ball thrown in by Loveless, he looks for a way out while evading a spider and a mousetrap, and swings into another hole with the help of a line he cut from the arachnid's web, only to slide down a pipe into a pen where the princess is tied to a stake, with Loveless and company towering over them. The doctor puts the cat in with them, but Artie tosses down a lockpick that Jim uses to drive it out of the small arena. Then Loveless taunts Jim with the restoring formula, which Artie manages to get ahold of and also tosses down. Jim drinks it, very quickly finds himself normal size (clothes and all), and tussles with Loveless's men while the doctor and Antoinette flee to the lab and hastily imbibe the formula to escape on the back of the doctor's titular avian.

    Jim and Artie restore the princess to her normal size to get her back to her father and her groom, the hotheaded Chawtaw (Santy Josol).

    I thought they did a fairly good job with the scale continuity except in the mousehole sequence. The web, in particular, looked too large and thick.

    _______

    WWWs2e04.jpg
    "The Night of the Big Blast"
    Originally aired October 7, 1966
    The episode opens with a scene patterned after Frankenstein in which Dr. Faustina (Ida Lupino), aided by her mute assistant Miklos (Bruce Manning), brings her Jim West to life in a lightning storm...her electronic equipment making bridge sounds from Trek. She fills the memoryless humanoid in on his assumed identity, has him demonstrate his superhuman strength, and instructs him to go to a cabinet meeting in New Orleans, all while he takes orders as if he were under hypnosis. Fake Jim arrives during Mardi Gras, takes out several locals who attack him after he rebuffs a flamenco dancer named Carmen (Rita D'Amico), and proceeds to the meeting location. He's greeted warmly by the Attorney General (Melville Ruick) and introduced to three cabinet secretaries, who are there to discuss convincing the president not to fund Faustina's research. At the scheduled time, Fake Jim blows up.

    Meanwhile, Artie runs into an old school flame named Lily Fortune (Mala Powers) at a Chinese restaurant and brings her back to the train to impress her. She's an actress who's heading to Orleans, so she and her mother (Patsy Kelly) travel there with Artie. Lily's impressed when Artie receives carrier pigeon orders from the president, but Prudence scoffs at the notion that he's a government agent. In the city, Artie is informed by agent Lyle Peters (Robert Miller Driscoll)--dressed as Blackbeard--that Jim apparently died when bombing the conference room. Artie becomes motivated to prove his late partner's innocence.

    Back at the lab, Miklos brings a fresh corpse to his mistress, which she plans to turn into another human bomb. Artie, while at a party with Lily trying to retrace Jim's footsteps, is accosted by men dressed as the Three Musketeers, bests one of them in a rapier duel, and questions him regarding who gave him his orders. In a twist that I saw coming, the masked and costumed woman whom he takes with him on a carriage ride turns out to be Faustina, who takes him prisoner and back to her lab, where she makes a mold of his face. While she's at work, she receives a letter from Grant turning down her funding request, so she decides on the spot to use Gordon in a scheme to kill the president.

    While Lily is looking for Artie at the train and runs into Peters--who convinces Prudence that Gordon is really an agent--Artie is rescued from Faustina's dungeon by a just-escaped fellow prisoner...Real Jim. The agents spy on Faustina reanimating her new Artie lookalike and giving him his assassination orders. The agents burst in and the agents engage in a lab-destroying fight with Miklos and fake Artie; but with the intervention of Faustina, Fake Artie gets away to have a bad encounter with the Fortune ladies on his way to the see Grant. Fake Artie is delayed outside the location by a guard, giving Jim and Artie time to ride up in a carriage to rope the double and drag him around the corner before he explodes on schedule.

    In the coda, Lily learns backstage at her show that her mother has eloped with Peters, and Artie proposes to her through Jim, only for her to politely reject the offer. "I couldn't live your kind of life--you'd always be disappearing or exploding..."

    _______

    Yeah, I considered saying something here, but there's a thread dedicated to it in the TOS forum. She was literally an inspiration.

    I think this might have come up passingly back in the Other Thread. I went in with little recollection of it expecting an appeal to the David Cassidy crowd, but it was different.

    One of their stand-outs.

    Good, ethereal psychedelic-era fare, and moody indeed. Also, this is another one that I can recall hearing when its chart run would have been either current or very recent.

    Michael's first chart-topper as a solo artist...kid may have a future in that. :p Oddly, this was the theme song of a horror film sequel about a killer rat.

    And oddly, by contrast, this late-coming, playful number was the seminal rock & roll pioneer's only pop chart-topper.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2022