The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    The Old Mixer, Somewhere in Connecticut
    _______

    55.5th-ish Anniversary Viewing

    _______

    The Ed Sullivan Show
    Season 18, episode 2
    Originally aired September 19, 1965
    As represented in The Best of the Ed Sullivan Show

    IN COLOR! And live from Television City in Hollywood; Ed's wearing a tux for the occasion.

    Princess Leia's other dad sings a medley consisting of "My Favorite Things" and "A Wonderful Day Like Today".

    Polly does a torchy rendition "What the World Needs Now Is Love"...a good portion of it in an awkwardly close head shot. If they hadn't eventually gone back to a longer shot, I might have thought she was doing something that the censors found objectionable.

    Opening with a logo reading "Tokyo Olympiad," artily edited color footage is shown of various athletes, including track runners, a weightlifter, fencers (shot so close you could barely tell), male and female gymnasts, swimmers, and cyclists...including some injuries. Ed says that the film will be premiering the next day at the New York World's Fair. This appears to be the full movie:


    According to the Metacritic listing, Eddie's performance of "Sunrise, Sunset," from that hot current Broadway musical Fiddler on the Roof, was originally part of the same medley as the previous songs. His rendition is lacking in the pathos that I'm accustomed to from the Broadway and film versions...not to mention the awkwardness of him doing a song that includes parts for multiple characters. "Is there a canopy is store for me?" Um...not in the way that line was intended, no.

    From the same broadcast, but not included in Best of:


    (Trek connection: their drummer is the boss's kid!)


    Also in the episode:
    _______

    Branded
    "Now Join the Human Race"
    Originally aired September 19, 1965
    A cavalry unit is scouring the wilderness for Red Hand (Burt Reynolds), who's hiding with his wife (Anne Morell) and infant child. Jason walks into the saloon that's serving as the field headquarters of Major Lynch (Noah Beery) and tries to talk some sense into him about the war he's likely to cause; the major isn't inclined to listen to Jason once he identifies himself, but takes an interest in Jason's offer to talk to Red Hand when he learns that Jason knows him. Jason finds Red Hand and talks him into going with the major so that he can tell the governor about the deplorable conditions at the reservation that he escaped from; but the major goes back on their deal and takes Red Hand into custody.

    At his hotel, Jason runs into another old acquaintance, Judge Markham (Jon Lormer). They talk about the situation, and while Jason wants to see that Red Hand receives due process, the problem is that he isn't considered a person under US law! The judge comes up with the strategy of proving that he's a human being in court, taking it all the way up to the Supreme Court if necessary. To this end, Jason approaches the major and requests a writ of habeas corpus, maneuvering him into taking the matter to Markham's court.

    Red Hand complicates matters, however, by escaping from his cell and attacking a couple of guarding officers. The major and his men find Red Hand, whom the major shoots as he's walking away. At that moment, Jason arrives with Red Hand's wife and child, having brought them with the intention of convincing him to surrender again; but instead he dies in front of them. Lynch argues that it wasn't murder because Red Hand was an animal. But Jason and Markham declare their intention to have Red Hand's wife request a writ so that the legal challenge can proceed as intended.

    As I'd vaguely recalled, there was a Season 1 episode in which Jason befriended some Apaches, including one named Red Arm, played by a different actor. I have to wonder if this was meant to be the same character.

    _______

    12 O'Clock High
    "R/X for a Sick Bird"
    Originally aired September 20, 1965
    This one I didn't do such a thorough review of previously...
    Brig. General Dave Creighton from G-2 (J.D. Cannon) brings Ilka Zradna (Gia Scala) to Gallagher's office. She's referred to as their "prime target," as she's a resistance leader who needs to be dropped behind the lines. Gallagher, however, isn't flying the mission himself, though Komansky will be serving as flight engineer...a combination that usually spells trouble for the pilot. Captain Langgaard (John Crowther), we'll hardly know ye. We learn that the 918th has been suffering maintenance issues, and see that they're actually the result of nighttime sabotage.

    After the mission commences, Gallagher chews out his discount maintenance chief of the week, Master Sgt. Tony Podesta (Tige Andrews), believing that his ability to keep the planes in the air is less than mod. What I missed the first time around is that Captain Zoller (Hans Gudegast) is introduced as a Polish liaison officer, which explains the obvious accent. He's a German spy conspiring with the saboteur, Sergeant Hansen (Don Quine), with whom he discusses whether Gallagher himself needs to be offed or just made to look ineffectual. Meanwhile, the bird used on the mission experiences engine failure and its crew has to bail. Only three crewmen--including Komansky--and Ilka make it back to Archbury.

    Tensions are running high in the NCO's club between the bomber crews and maintenance personnel when Komansky returns and ends up in a fight with Podesta, which Gallagher breaks up. Ilka tells Gallagher how Langgaard sacrificed himself to keep the plane high enough for the others to bail. Gallagher tries to arrange a date with Ilya, to find that she's been very busily booked with other officers. Komansky is busted down to private, but Gallagher offers to restore his rank if he patches things up with Podesta. Sandy goes looking for him late at night and gets stunned by an unseen figure in a shed, where he finds that ammo was being tampered with, and items have been left behind that belong to Podesta. Gallagher immediately reports this to Creighton, who brings in Major Adams from counterintelligence (Paul Comi) to share that they've already been working on intel that twenty German agents have taken the identities of US personnel in England, and are trying to root them out; as well as that Podesta is actually one of Adams's men. They persuade a reluctant Gallagher to stick with the mission and not share this info with his men. Meanwhile, Sandy's continuing to look for Podesta late at night, and finds him dead.

    The death has been made to look like a suicide, and Creighton and Adams maintain that illusion; but against their wishes, Gallagher brings Stovall and Komansky into his office to share the truth out in the open. Attempting to fish out exactly how important Zradna is and why, Zoller goes into Gallagher's office while she's there and shares his speculation on the matter, pretending to be concerned for her. Gallagher remains tight-lipped, but realizes that Zoller knew something about Adams, who's on the base undercover, that he shouldn't have. Creighton pretends to bring Zoller in on things to entrap him...using the mission with Zradna as bait. Unable to keep his mouth shut, Gallagher brings Ilka in on what's really going on the night before the mission. She's willing to take the risk, and expressing her philosophy of living for today because you don't know what tomorrow will bring, she acts on the mutual attraction between her and Gallagher.

    On the day of the mission, Adams busts Hansen, and some MPs go to Zoller's place and blow him away in an exchange of fire while he's trying to escape. But the thermos of coffee is still brought to the plane via a third man, Sgt. Pierson (Tom Stern). This triggers alarm bells with Gallagher because of his association with Hansen and whereabouts on the nights of the sabotaged missions, so Gallagher has him taken into custody and shoots the thermos outside with a rifle, causing the explosive to detonate.

    In the Epilog, the mission to drop Ilka in Warsaw commences, and succeeds, with Gallagher seeing her out the hatch.

    _______

    Gilligan's Island
    "Beauty Is as Beauty Does"
    Originally aired September 23, 1965
    The castaways are enjoying dinner when Ginger is upset about a radio report concerning a rival having won a beauty contest. This motivates Skipper to propose a toast to Ginger as the most beautiful castaway. Mrs. Howell then fishes for some attention, and Thurston proposes a toast to her. Finally, the Professor voluntarily proposes a toast to his bottom-credits buddy; so Gilligan proposes the contest...which he comes to regret, as the others expect him to be the judge.

    Each of the toast-proposers attempts to prepare his nominee for the contest, with mishaps ensuing. Gilligan takes a walk in the jungle, during which we meet Gladys, with whom Gilligan is already acquainted. Then the three parties compete in employing various tactics to woo and persuade him in judging the contest. The night of the pageant arrives, and some underhanded attempts to sabotage rival contestants ensue during the makeshift versions of familiar segments. But when it's time to choose a winner, Gilligan pulls out his Gordian knot solution, arguing that Gladys is the only contestant who's native to the island. Nevertheless, in the coda the other male castaways try to get Gilligan to tell them who really won.

    _______

    The Wild Wild West
    "The Night of the Deadly Bed"
    Originally aired September 24, 1965
    Jim attempts to rendezvous with a Captain Jackson outside a cantina, but is attacked by a guitar player with a garotte fashioned from one of his strings, who's accidentally stabbed in the melee by a second attacker. Jim proceeds to meet with Jackson, but there's an explosion as Jim's entering the warehouse. Jackson's last word is "Flory".

    Jim meets up with the train, where Artie's been preparing dynamite disguised as coal with a temporary heat-resistant coating at Jackson's request. Jim goes back to the cantina to find no girl behind the bar this time and and a different guitar player; but there's also a flirty dancer, Gatita (Barbara Luna), who knew Jackson and says that he was looking for treasures of art. She invites Jim up to her room to tell him more, but slips him a drugged drink, leaves him on the canopy bed, and, before she leaves, pulls a rope that activates exactly the sort of trap that you'd expect a deadly canopy bed to be equipped with--a spiked panel that lowers at a suspenseful pace.

    Jim wakes up in time to escape. Outside he sees peasants carrying coal, and follows them to a mission. After meeting up with the train again, he goes back to the mission to snoop around. There he sees a girl, Roxanne (Danica d'Hondt), being chased by dogs inside the walls and begging Monsieur Flory (J. D. Cannon) for mercy. He then sneaks into an underground cavern where the peasants were taking the coal, and sees them shoveling it into fires. But he ends up trapped in a small room and knocked unconscious. He wakes up in another canopy bed, this time with Gatita begging him for help. Before she can explain, they're taken downstairs, where Flory is dining while Roxanne is starving. Gatita tries to help Roxanne and takes her away, following which Flory tells Jim that by tomorrow he'll be dead. Flory's plan is to reestablish Napoleonic control in the Western Hemisphere via Mexico; and to prevent the Army from stopping him, he intends to cripple the US railroad system. He demonstrates a scale model version of his means of doing this, his Engine of Destruction, an armored railroad vehicle designed to derail trains via battering. He then shows Jim the battering ram of the real McCoy.

    Flory takes Jim outside and has him tied to gong, with a trap set to crush him against it via the ram-thingie that rings the gong. Jim escapes in the nick of time by using a mirrored ring to burn the ropes on his opposite hand via sunlight, while Artie, who's shown up in disguise with his customized coal, provide a distraction. Flory shoots Artie's sleeping gas-filled flask, and he and Jim end up as prisoners underground, with Gatita being held in a cage. While Flory offers Jim and Artie a ride on the front of the battering ram, Artie brings Jim's attention to the sack of coal that he planted. While Artie provides another distraction, freeing Gatita and inciting the peasants with her help, Jim gets out of his irons using a cutting tool in the ring. Flory goes back in to confront Jim while he's shoveling the coal in the furnace, but Jim manages to take him down and batter his way out of the chamber in time, before the whole place blows sky high.

    In the coda, Jim spends some quality time with Gatita on the train.

    _______

    Hogan's Heroes
    "Hold That Tiger"
    Originally aired September 24, 1965
    IN COLOR! And now with regular series opening credits that include Larry Hovis.

    The prisoners learn of the tanks when Klink's attempting to lower their morale with news of how well Germany's doing in the war. Newkirk poses as a Gestapo officer first to get out of the camp (when nobody remembers letting him in), and then to drive the tank in under cover of there having been a report of prisoners rioting. The Tiger is quickly hidden in the rec hall, which the prisoners have prepared with a hidden garage-size entrance. LeBeau was supposed to exchange clothes with their underground contact, Tiger, to get them in the camp, but he brings the contact in via the tunnel (now with the barracks bunk entrance) because the contact turned out to be Arlene Martel (in her first of five appearances in the role, and seven appearances in the series altogether). Hogan is upset with this operation-endangering development, but the rest of the guys are more enthusiastic.

    Klink gets a visit from the tank division commander, General Hofstader (that's not confusing; Henry Rico Cattani), but is at a loss to explain where the tank went during the faux escape covering the prisoner switch. While the general's there, Newkirk sets the tank to roll out of the rec hall toward the gate, which serves a diversion for Tiger to get out with blueprints. Sparks have ignited between her and Hogan along the way, so she departs with a kiss.

    As in the pilot, Schultz is portrayed as a sort of unwitting co-conspirator rather than somebody the prisoners have to fool. This includes seeing Newkirk in his Gestapo uniform and knowing about Tiger's presence among the prisoners.

    Dis-MISSED!

    _______

    Get Smart
    "Diplomat's Daughter"
    Originally aired September 25, 1965
    Max is within sight of one of the kidnappings, obliviously getting his shoes shined, when he takes a call on one of them.

    The Chief: This is the Chief! Who else would be calling you on your shoe?​

    When the Chief informs Max that he's being given a kidnapping case...

    Max: Oh, good--who do you want me to kidnap?​

    The Chief hands Max some contact information, which Max burns before reading it. The Chief tells Max of how a series of blondes abducted from the area (because, as it turns out, all Americans look alike to the abductors). Max is assigned to protect the kidnappers' likely intended target, a princess (Inger Stratton), because he saved her father's life years previously. 99 acts jealous of the flirty attention that the princess pays to Max.

    At a tour of the Smithsonian, Max accidentally wings his tail with a cigarette lighter gun. They tail him to the kidnappers' hideout, where Max meets the Claw. This episode has aged particularly poorly just in the past year, with all of its Asian-themed gags...chief among them, the villain pronouncing his name "The Craw". Max and 99 escape into a discotheque that serves as the lair's front, the Shaghai-a-Go-Go...

    Max: The poor devils, what have they done to them?
    99: They're dancing, Max, that's the style now!​

    Max defeats the Claw by tossing a tray of silverware at his magnetic hand, which is weighed down by the heavy ball that forms around it.

    _______

    I was looking for an opportunity to get a Truman clip in! Alas, we didn't get a month-level explanation of the sacking of MacArthur...there was some set-up of it in the 1950s entries, which I didn't include, waiting for the main event. I read that he was under orders to clear all of his public statements.

    Les did invent the electric guitar.

    And one I watched last year, I think it was.

    It definitely doesn't sound as rock & roll as "Rocket 88," which is basically Chuck Berry without the guitar.

    Eh.

    Ten in four seasons! And Max will have Siegfried to keep him busy.

    (Ah, now an explanation for Jerry Bauman's marital continuity discrepancies that involves him secretly being Siegfried...that would be the ticket!)
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2021
  2. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Dressed all in black and white for the color debut. That's our Ed. :D

    Red Skelton certainly got a lot of time. My Grandmother used to hit me with that "wrinkled-and-green" line all the time. And speaking of B-movies, Red did a series of mystery movies in the 40s about a radio actor who gets caught up in real crimes and they're pretty good-- I have to remember to add them to my collection at some point.

    Rocky! Among a zillion other things.

    "The Measure of a Man."

    That plan ended badly.

    They sure sound related. :rommie:

    Podesta knows everything, but inexplicably doesn't report to his superiors.

    I wonder if there were 12 O'Clock High-themed lunchboxes and thermoses back in the day.

    Pretty smart for a dumb guy. :rommie:

    Sounds like a second-string assassin.

    There's a factory in Toledo that mass produces these things.

    Love, Wild Wild West style.

    Jim immediately wants it for his own train. :rommie:

    Haha. :D

    Ah, his first disguise.

    :rommie:

    Already the seeds are being planted. :rommie:

    I guess that forked up his plans.

    True enough. Bernie Kopell is great and I love Siegfried.

    Good one. I had forgotten that Bernie Kopell played Jerry.

    Aaaand it would help if I clicked Submit.... :rommie:
     
  3. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    55 Years Ago This Week

    May 22 –The 271st and final episode of the television legal drama Perry Mason was shown on CBS, bringing an end to a nine-season run that featured Raymond Burr in the title role. "The Case of the Final Fade-Out" included an uncredited appearance by Erle Stanley Gardner, the author who created the Perry Mason series of books, as a judge presiding over Mason's final murder defense. Members of the production crew appeared in cameo roles portraying the production crew for a fictitious TV series.
    May 24
    • Battle of Mengo Hill: Ugandan army troops arrest Mutesa II of Buganda and occupy his palace.
    • The Nigerian government forbids all political activity in the country until January 17, 1969.
    May 25
    • Five years after President John F. Kennedy's call for a commitment of "landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the earth", NASA unveiled the prototype of the machine that would take astronauts there. At 363 feet (111 m) tall (equivalent to a 30-story building) the Saturn V rocket was larger than any predecessor, and three times as powerful as the Titan II GLV rocket used in the Gemini program.

    • Explorer program: Satellite Explorer 32 (Atmosphere Explorer-B) is launched from the United States.
    • No. 9 Squadron RAAF becomes part of the 4,500 strong Australian Task Force assigned to duties in Vietnam, leaving for Southeast Asia aboard the aircraft carrier HMAS Sydney.
    May 26 – British Guiana achieves independence, becoming Guyana.
    May 27 – John Lennon and George Harrison see Bob Dylan in concert at the Royal Albert Hall, London. In the second half, Dylan--backed by the Band--is booed and jeered by the audience when he switches to electric instruments.
    [Come on, Britain, that is so 1965...]
    May 28
    • Fidel Castro declares martial law in Cuba because of a possible U.S. attack.
    • The Indonesian and Malaysian governments declare that the Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation is over (a treaty is signed on August 11).
    • Boat ride "It's a Small World" opens at Disneyland.


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down)," Cher (11 weeks)
    • "I'll Take Good Care of You," Garnet Mimms (9 weeks)
    • "Louie Louie," The Kingsmen (18 weeks total; 2 weeks this run)
    • "Love's Made a Fool of You," Bobby Fuller Four (6 weeks)
    • "Try Too Hard," The Dave Clark Five (8 weeks)

    Recent and new on the chart:

    "Solitary Man," Neil Diamond

    (May 21; #55 US; recharts in 1970, reaching #21 US, #6 AC)

    "River Deep – Mountain High," Ike & Tina Turner

    (#88 US; #3 UK; #33 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time)

    "Crying," Jay & The Americans

    (#25 US)

    "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," The Temptations

    (#13 US; #1 R&B; #21 UK)

    _______

    Timeline entries are quoted from the Wiki pages for the month or year and Mark Lewisohn's The Beatles Day by Day.

    _______

    I never knew much about him, but remember my dad liking him.

    Had to look that up. Neither the first nor second character I immediately associate with that name.

    In stark contrast to Gallagher, who wants to blab classified information during wartime to everyone! He makes it look good, though..."I trust my men, they deserve to know what they're facing!"

    A search didn't turn one up. Will you settle for Hogan's Heroes? (Also stumbled across this one.)

    There was a 12 O'Clock High Dell comic.
     
  4. Nerys Myk

    Nerys Myk Cartoon Premium Member

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    As a kid I used to imagine all the WWII based comedies and dramas took place in the same Universe. So someone from 12 O'Clock High who was shot down could count on Hogan getting them home. I think the closest it cam to reality was a flashback on Green Acres where Oliver gets shot down over occupied Europe and Lisa mentions Stalag 13. :lol:
     
  5. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    These simple facts tell me that the producers were aware that the show was coming to an end. See how much Perry has taught me about observation and attention to detail? :mallory:

    Also, his girlfriend left him when he switched to an electric razor.

    Neil Diamond is still good.

    Yep, that's a good one.

    Nothing wrong with it, except it's unnecessary.

    This is pretty good.

    He's pretty funny. There's something endearing about him.

    I had a feeling that might be perplexing. :rommie:

    They used to be quite a thing. I had Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and It's About Time, of all things.

    Oh, man, between Dell and Gold Key, I think there was a comic book for every TV show out there. :rommie:

    There we go, that's what we like to see. :rommie:
     
  6. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    50 Years Ago This Week

    May 23 – An air crash at Rijeka Airport, Yugoslavia kills 78 people, mostly British tourists.
    May 26
    • Austria and the People's Republic of China establish diplomatic relations.
    • Qantas agrees to pay $500,000 to bomb hoaxer-extortionist Mr. Brown (Peter Macari), who is later arrested.
    May 27
    • Six armed passengers hijack a Romanian passenger plane and force it to fly to Vienna.
    • Christie's auctions a diamond known as Deepdene; it is later found to be artificially colored.
    May 28
    • First release of Paul and Linda McCartney's LP Ram in the UK.
    • Portugal resigns from UNESCO.
    • Died: Audie Murphy, 45, "the nation's most-decorated hero of World War II" who was awarded the Medal of Honor, and later became a successful film actor, was killed along with five other people when the plane he was on crashed into Brush Mountain, near Catawba, Virginia. The twin-engine Aero Commander was on its way from Atlanta to Martinsville, Virginia when it went down shortly after 11:00 in the morning, when its pilot radioed that he was going to try to land in Roanoke because of bad weather. The wreckage was found after a two day search.


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Another Day" / "Oh Woman, Oh Why", Paul McCartney (12 weeks)
    • "We Can Work It Out," Stevie Wonder (11 weeks)

    Recent and new on the chart:

    "Cry Baby," Janis Joplin

    (May 15; #42 US)

    "Walk Away," The James Gang

    (#51 US)

    "If Not for You," Olivia Newton-John

    (#25 US; #1 AC; #7 UK)

    "Signs," Five Man Electrical Band

    (#3 US)

    "Mr. Big Stuff," Jean Knight

    (#2 US; #1 R&B)

    _______

    Timeline entries are quoted from the Wiki pages for the month or year and Mark Lewisohn's The Beatles Day by Day.

    _______

    Kinda good for the first time here.

    It's distinctive, and reportedly Phil Spector considered it to be his best work.

    It does sound very close to Orbison.

    One of their more classic numbers.

    My first thought was that maybe he did voice work...

    But sometimes the downed pilots were found and snitched on by young Gerhard Baumann, who went on to work for KAOS...
     
  7. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    I thought Twilight Zone was off the air by now.

    Not the best song, but it's got that signature Janis sound.

    Good one. Definitely sounds like the 70s. It's another one that I had no idea what it was until I heard it.

    I like early 70s Olivia Newton-John.

    Sounds like it should be profound, but makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. :rommie:

    This is cute and also has that strong 70s sound. I used to hear this on Lost 45s all the time.

    Oh, yeah. :rommie:

    I was actually going to write that it sounds like he's impersonating Orbison.

    I don't get it, but I think we're on to another epic here. :rommie:
     
  8. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    How's that?

    Strong vocal performance, but a little draggy.

    And another James Gang song that didn't make the Top 40 as a single, but became an album-oriented rock radio staple. I suspect that these singles attracted more interest after the Eagles became a thing.

    Olivia makes her chart debut doing Harrison doing Dylan. This one was unavailable for download...likely because it was done on an early label. But she doesn't seem to currently have a straight-up hits compilation available either. She did a few years back when I bought her other singles.

    In its original context, I think it's very you-know-what o' the times. My main issue with the song is that I was originally exposed to it via a 1990 cover by Tesla--ugh!

    This was just regular oldies radio fare in my neck.

    I think it underscores a similarity in Jay Black's singing style to Orbison's.

    Gerhard Baumann = Jerry Bauman, a.k.a. Siegfried.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2021
  9. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Six-armed hijackers. :rommie:

    That's very odd, especially since she's been pretty sick for a while.

    Ugh, indeed. I unfortunately remember that.

    Ah, but of course. Sehr gut!
     
  10. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    That's why punctuation matters. :p

    :beer: Dylan has gone octogenarian! :beer:

    ETA: Today in my 55th anniversary shuffle, the Orbison and Jay & the Americans versions of "Crying" came up back-to-back!
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2021
  11. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    :D

    I know! He' just three months younger than my Mother.

    Could you tell the difference? :rommie:
     
  12. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    55.5th-ish Anniversary Viewing

    _______

    The Ed Sullivan Show
    Season 18, episode 3
    Originally aired September 26, 1965

    This is another episode that wasn't represented in The Best of the Ed Sullivan Show. With the help of its Metacritic listing, I bring you these offerings...

    Sonny & Cher, "I Got You Babe" (short clip):

    According to the listing, this was part of a medley with "Where Do You Go?" (Cher solo) and "But You're Mine".

    Turk Murphy & His Band, "(Won't You Come Home) Bill Bailey":


    Gertrude Berg, "How to be a Jewish Mother" comedy routine:


    Balancer Komazuru Tsukushi:

    Nice to hear some individualized performance music rather than the same three or so pieces that Best of always uses.

    Other performances:
    These appear to be the exact same listings that used to be on tv.com, just formatted differently on the new site's pages.

    _______

    Branded
    "Mightier Than the Sword"
    Originally aired September 26, 1965
    Jason rides into town to find a fistfight outside the office of the Banner, a newspaper that we learn is renowned for its integrity. Jason punches his way past the winner at the door to find another thug smashing up the place and beating up one of its employees, while a woman lies huddled and crying--Ann Williams (Lola Albright), another old acquaintance. The employee is her printer, Anders (Ed McCready), who quits on the spot. Jason learns that Ann's father, Adam, passed away a month prior (in 1873). She's been running the Banner since, but is planning to sell it. Jason notices the paper's slogan--"Truth, Honor, Integrity"--carved on the tombstone.

    As they clean up the office, Ann explains how Paul Mandell runs the town, and that Adam had refused to endorse him for a political appointment and was digging into his past. A flirtatious woman named Teddi Stafford (Maureen Arthur) brings Jason to see Mandell (Kevin Hagen). He explains how he's under consideration to head the opening of a new territory, and plans to buy the Banner to take advantage of its reputation and endorse himself. Jason sees that he's ruthless and dangerous, and persuades Ann to finish her father's story. To that end, he reads from a framed personal letter that her father received from...Abraham Lincoln. OK, that's getting a bit heavy-handed.

    Ann finishes her father's expose, which describes how Mandell bought his way out of service and played both sides of the Civil War for profit. As she and Jason start getting romantic over their accomplishment, one of the thugs busts in shooting and Jason takes him down, as well as the other one, who tries to sneak in the back. Jason and Ann show Mandell the latest edition and inform him that they're sending copies to Washington. A fistfight ensues, with Jason taking it out into the street so the town can watch as Mandell gets the crap beat out of him by a renowned coward, ending up in a water trough...while Ann hands out copies of the paper to the onlookers. Teddi gets hysterical about how she'd been afraid of Mandell.

    In the coda, Anders is back on the job as Jason heads out to a bridge engineering job in Missouri, saying his goodbyes to Ann.

    The henchmen were played by Michael Lane and Charles Horvath. I didn't catch which was which.

    _______

    12 O'Clock High
    "Then Came the Mighty Hunter"
    Originally aired September 27, 1965
    https://www.trekbbs.com/threads/the-classic-retro-pop-culture-thread.278375/page-75#post-12286385
    The episode opens with Gallagher's group getting flakked up in what he considers to be a suicide mission on a factory in Hagensburg. Back at Archbury, Corporal Steven Corbett (Beau Bridges), eager to get in on the action, approaches Komansky to get in as a replacement on Gallagher's crew. Everyone is impressed by his gunnery record, but a little put off by his over-eagerness to take advantage of the circumstances. In conference with Britt and some others at wing HQ, Gallagher offers a plan to go in with a small formation under cover of a larger diversionary run elsewhere. In a practice run against a simulated target over Scotland, Corbett loses his shit when his waist gun won't fire, following which he won't show his face on the ground. Komansky feels sympathetic for and invested in him, and Gallagher in turn sees the situation as an opportunity for Komansky to grow as a leader.

    Sandy takes Corbett to a place in Archbury that's a little quieter than the Star & Bottle and asks one of the regular girls there, Floy (Judy Carne), to hook Steven up with a girl who'd be his type...but by the time she's found somebody, an attraction has already sparked between Steven and the owner's more respectable 17-year-old daughter, Gillian Denby (Carol Booth). The episode goes out of its way to signpost the age issue with too-obvious stuff like Steven preferring milk to beer. The next day over Scotland, Corbett is showing signs of having gotten little sleep when the group runs into an actual squadron of German fighters. Corbett freezes like a deer in the headlights faced with the real thing, and only opens fire after his fellow waist gunner, Sgt. Rodale (Tom Skerritt), is shot up and with some prodding from the cockpit. When he does, he takes his target down cleanly, but seems horrified by what he's done, and is too shocked to get help for Rodale. Nevertheless, Gallagher promotes him to buck sergeant over the intercom. Back on the ground, Corbett asks to see Gallagher and confesses about being not 19, but 15.

    Steven's cousin Corporal Smith (Ted Bessell) comes to see him in the base hospital, and blabs to Rodale about Steven being underage. Komansky wants to bail on his responsibility for Corbett, but Gallagher won't let him off the hook. In the hospital, Corbett takes a lot of ribbing from Rodale and the other guys--including one patient played by William Christopher--and ends up running away, a.k.a. going AWOL. Sandy finds him hiding at the Not Star & Bottle, and convinces him to come back by sharing that he was also (not as) underage when he joined, as well as in trouble with the law. Sandy covers for Corbett having actually left the base, which Gallagher sees through, but considers to be a sign of that growth in Komansky that he was looking for. Corbett is eager to have another opportunity to prove himself, and when the real mission comes up, he bluffs his way onto the plane, with Komansky and Gallagher not finding out until they're approaching the target. This is when Sandy threatens to spank him, and if we're buying into the character's age, he has earned it by this point. Corbett is put in the radio room, but the radio operator and then both waist gunners are shot up by German fighters. After initially doing his deer impression again, he takes turns at both guns, shooting down several German fighters while fueled by rage.

    Back on the ground, Gallagher chews Corbett out, making it clear that the thing about officers not being allowed to manhandle enlisted men is the only thing stopping him from doing what Sandy threatened to do. But once Corbett has been dismissed, Gallagher tells Komansky that he wants Corbett promoted to staff sergeant and put in for a Silver Star that he won't be approved for, so that these things will be on his record before he's discharged.

    "Oh, Corporal Smith" count: 0

    _______

    Gilligan's Island
    "The Little Dictator"
    Originally aired September 30, 1965
    Rodriguez is unceremoniously dropped off by a motorboat, and quickly runs into Gilligan picking berries. Gilligan accidentally picks el Presidente's gun, but he takes it back, and has Gilligan (whom he comes to refer to as George, based on Gilligan having sarcastically identifying himself as Washington) take him to the other castaways, whom he considers to be his new subjects, and himself to be the founder of a new country. The castaways conspire to get his gun from him or get him to fire all of his bullets...first via Ginger putting the moves on him, though she proves too interested in actually learning to fire it; then by trying to catch him in a net trap, though Mr. Howell ends up in it while trying to lure him out of his hut.

    Rodriguez tries to execute Gilligan, but it turns out that he's two bullets short, so the castaways confiscate his empty gun and try to turn him into a citizen of the island. He attempts to talk Gilligan into being a puppet leader...everybody seems to have forgotten that he was already the island's president. In his hammock, Gilligan goes into a dream sequence about being a dictator, with the others as his cabinet (or in Ginger's case Secret Agent 0036), who try to convince him what terrible shape his country is in. Rodriguez ends up implying that he's shot the others, and reveals that Gilligan's just his puppet, complete with the strings appearing. When Gilligan wakes up from his dream, he finds that the boat has come back to pick Rodriguez up, el Presidente's faction having regained power.

    The Professor's giving the others Spanish lessons to prepare them for their stay in Ecuarico when they get the radio report that Rodriguez has now been exiled to a mountaintop in the Andes, having been considered insane for his tales of ruling the island.

    _______

    The Wild Wild West
    "The Night the Wizard Shook the Earth"
    Originally aired October 1, 1965
    In a foggy harbor town, with the assistance of Voltaire, Dr. Loveless plans to kill Professor Nielsen by blowing a pellet of a highly potent explosive at him; but Jim is posing as the professor for his protection...and Loveless can tell that he's not the real McCoy (Harry Bartell), whom he spots posing as Fake Nielsen's butler and blows away. Jim stays close to the professor's secretary, Greta Lundquist (Leslie Parrish), thinking that she may be a target...but when Voltaire brings her a message, we learn that she's working for Loveless. Loveless next makes an attempt on Jim via ride-by crossbow.

    Greta having been outed by the way she set Jim up for the hit, he pretends to be interested in selling secret papers that he claims the professor left with him, so she arranges a meeting with Loveless at his estate. Jim first meets his Moriarty engaged in combat practice against several burly fighters, armed with a cane. As a test of Jim's loyalty, Loveless asks him to deliver his demand for control of a vast area of desert land to the governor, threatening to kill 5,000 people a week with his planted explosives until it's been met. Jim delivers the message, but asks for men to surround Loveless's estate...and his secretary, Miss Piecemeal (future Klink secretary Sigrid Valdis), is also working for Loveless. Jim tries to escape Loveless's men via a trick coach that includes a passenger ejector seat and secret weapon compartments, but is still nabbed by Voltaire and another man outside.

    Back at his estate, Loveless boasts to Jim of outlandish-sounding inventions that he's devised to better the world--which we recognize as radio, automobiles, airplanes, and penicillin. He then uses a trap door to put Jim in an iron maiden. While she's feeding him, Jim appeals to Greta's romantic side to help free him, and she tells him that the explosives are in a clock tower near the governor's mansion. He busts out of unlocked cage, takes down a couple of Loveless's men, rushes to the clock tower, and gets past Voltaire a lot more easily that Roger Moore would. While Loveless defiantly sits on bottles of the explosive, Jim climbs into the tower rafters to stop the clock from striking by using the doctor's cane. Loveless mounts the pendulum to unjam the gears, but Jim reaches the bottles and defuses them.

    Artie, whose appearances in the episode are only bookends, pops back up for the train coda, in which he relates how Loveless took one of his inventions with him to prison...a glass tube that could catch pictures sent through the air!

    _______

    Hogan's Heroes
    "Kommandant of the Year"
    Originally aired October 1, 1965
    The prisoners use the rain barrel periscope to check out the large item that's been brought to the Stalag on the back of a truck, though it's covered. In Klink's office, Major Hauser (William Allyn) presents orders from General Burkhalter (who doesn't appear in the episode) placing Stalag 13 at his disposal, and the prisoners learn via the coffee pot that it's a V-bomb (and they're still running the gag about the pot also being used to make coffee on the side). Hogan radios for permission to blow it up, but is told that three commandos and a scientist will be dropped into the area instead. Hogan uses a visit to Klink's office to plant a dispatch about Klink receiving his award, which identifies the scientist, Schneider, as a colonel in Burkhalter's staff who'll be visiting to bestow it.

    LeBeau is sent out to find the commandoes, and an escape is reported so that the prisoner-trained dogs are released to help him. After the party is found and LeBeau gets Schneider's measurements, he lets the dogs bring him in. Schneider (Woodrow Parfrey) is later brought in via a staff car in uniform, with the commandos posing as his staff. Schneider fakes a public presentation, and while Klink is giving a long-winded speech, slips under the nearby tarp to take pictures, while Hogan sets a bomb that will cause the rocket to fire. Schneider is caught coming out from under the tarp by Hauser, who buys his excuse for being there and wants to show off his rocket. Schneider manages to slip back out before the bomb goes off, following which Hauser walks out looking like he'd been smoking dynamite in a Loony Tunes installment.

    In the coda we learn that the rocket destroyed an airfield in Hamburg; and Schultz clearly knows that it was Hogan's doing, scolding him in private.

    "Now Hogan, I am a very busy man, you are dismissed!"

    _______

    Get Smart
    "School Days"
    Originally aired October 2, 1965
    Arriving at the school under a cover that even Dean Watson (Byron Morrow) doesn't know about, Max goes to the wrong house; when he gives his pass-phrase, the neighbor (Kitty Kelly) tells him that the spy school is next door. 99 and K-13/Fang are already embedded there. Max walking through the grounds as everyone trains in various types of combat spoofs on the SPECTRE training school in From Russia with Love...and they're training with, among other things, garotte watches and razor-edged hats. Max throws his hat through the neighbor lady's window. British CONTROL officer Hillary Gainsborough (Ben Wright) catches Max and 99 snooping around, so they have to drop their covers, and eventually Watson is informed.

    Max zeroes in on three likely suspects--Grillak (Leo Gordon), Zukor (Henry Brandon), and Dimitri (an uncredited Philip Roth)--and attempts to covertly test them for unique characteristics that aren't in their training school files. One of these involves Max wearing a suit jacket with carbon paper lining to obtain a handwriting sample from a note written on his back. After each of the tests proves bumblingly inconclusive, Max announces his identity and that he knows who the impostor is. He and 99 and promptly abducted and tied up next to a bomb, but Fang saves them. Then Max confronts each of the three suspects and directly challenges them with new tests. When each passes, he names Gainsborough as a suspect, and he comes right out and confesses in a comedically anticlimactic manner.

    _______

    A belated Happy Birthday to her, too!

    FWIW, my ex's landlord turned 96 last week! He's a WWII vet and still very physically active. Does all the lawn work, snow-blowing, you name it.

    Not much.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2021
  13. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Location:
    RJDiogenes of Boston
    These old clips of Sonny & Cher are kind of sad-- they were so Hippie, and then... yeesh.

    I wonder if comedians like this even exist anymore, outside of open-mike night.

    Three? I thought there was just that one loop that was later used to torture prisoners at Guantanamo.

    Journalistic integrity. Branded is now officially Science Fiction. :rommie:

    He really got around.

    "Please cancel my subscription forthwith...."

    If only it was that easy. Maybe if we break down real life into thirty-minute segments.

    Yep, I remember talking about this episode before.

    Intellectually, I know that's a significant difference, but.... :rommie:

    There's a familiar name.

    Who later felt guilty about it and decided to become a chaplain.

    If you're underage, are you really officially in the service, and can you actually go AWOL?

    When he should be home reading comic books.

    Nice touch.

    :rommie:

    There must have been a mothership out there somewhere. :rommie:

    There were endless recounts until everybody got bored with the whole thing.

    I always love these dream sequences-- I remember the ships sinking in the harbor. :rommie:

    It would be funny if he found himself with another group of seven people stranded in the caves on the mountaintop.

    A good title for Miguelito's first appearance.

    This is exactly the scene I was thinking of when I said the black-and-white episodes worked well.

    A bit of a Bondian touch there.

    If only he used his powers for good.

    Much as I love Roger Moore, there's quite a difference in physique there. :rommie:

    He won't be wasting time watching the tube, though. The prison hasn't been built that can hold Dr Loveless!

    But they instinctively know that it's vital to the Axis war effort-- why else store it in a random stalag?

    Something tells me this show is not intended as a documentary.

    Good shot.

    So weird. I wonder how long that lasts.

    Killing time while getting over writer's block?

    Fang is kind of a deus ex machina.

    Thank you. :)

    Good for him. He's an inspiration. :mallory:
     
  14. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    The Old Mixer, Somewhere in Connecticut
    Funny you should mention that...I was just working ahead on my 50th anniversary posts and came across a news item about the debut of the first iteration of their variety show as a summer replacement series...and the full episode is on YouTube...

    There's definitely at least a fast and a slow one. The slow one gets used a bit less. I'll have to pay more attention when watching clips from Best of.

    It made a big difference to Gallagher...in addition to the danger to the boy, it left the service open to all sorts of liability and bad propaganda. That was the role of No Donald that I missed the first time around...Gallagher was trying to keep it quiet while they dealt with the matter, and Mr. Newsview went to the hospital and blabbed about it to the guys.

    Evidently so. The way the episode was playing it, he was being treated as a noncom until he was formally discharged. And you hear about guys who signed up a little early all the time.

    Spinoff...?

    And I'm pretty sure that foggy harbor town was meant to be Frisco, though I didn't catch it identified as such.

    Plus, he doesn't get any stations...

    Before we met Shouty Spock, there was...Smart Schutlz!

    Ah...IMDb classifies him as "Philip Roth (II)," a character actor.

    Or a canine ex machina...another bit of early installment weirdness in one of these shows, as I don't recall him appearing from where I originally picked up in late Season 2.

    As for the ex herself...50 Years Ago Last Week, she hit 18! 70 Years Ago This Season, I think her oldest brother has been born, but I'll have to ask about his birthday.

    ETA: I've confirmed that the Mixer's Ex Generation kicked off 70 Years Ago Last Season, in March!
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2021
  15. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Location:
    RJDiogenes of Boston
    I'll have to track that down. I used to watch them whenever they were on.

    Oh, yeah, definitely. It's just that I'm not seeing a lot of difference in 15 and 19 year olds. Or twenty and thirty year olds, for that matter, but that's partly contemporary society. :rommie:

    Well, if he gets to be AWOL, he should be able to get that medal. :rommie:

    Right! Labyrinthine caves and Yeti. Do they have Yeti in the Andes? I'll have to check.

    He invented stations, too. He had three networks, broadcasting to nobody....

    I think we already speculated that he was faking, didn't we? I seem to remember something like that.

    Random trivia: It was also the name of Tony Curtis's character on Vega$ (not counting the pilot, where he was Bernie Roth-- how do I remember these things?).

    I think he will disappear pretty quickly.

    Happy Birthday to her. [​IMG]
     
  16. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    The Old Mixer, Somewhere in Connecticut
    No need, it's coming in due time. But...

    Steady work for Janos Prohaska.
    Does 1960s TV give a crap?

    You mean that Schultz was acting dumb later? Possibly. The weird thing here is that the prisoners are perfectly in the know and open about the things they're doing in front of him...showing off Newkirk's disguise, Hogan admitting that he sabotaged the rocket. I imagine that somewhere down the line, they decided that Dumb Schultz was funnier.
     
  17. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

    Joined:
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    Groovy. August 1, 1971. That was a great Summer.

    A veteran of Outer Limits and Star Trek? I'd make him a regular. :rommie:

    A very good point.

    Yeah, I think we had Schultz being taken away by Allied soldiers at the end of the war and basically acknowledging that he was no Nazi and he knew everything. That would have made a good finale.
     
  18. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    The Old Mixer, Somewhere in Connecticut
    55 Years Ago This Week

    May 29 – Sports stadium Estadio Azteca officially opens in Mexico City in advance of the 1968 Summer Olympics.
    May 31 – The Philippines reestablishes diplomatic relations with Malaysia.

    June 1
    • The 158th and last original episode of The Dick Van Dyke Show appeared on the CBS television network. The situation comedy, starring Dick Van Dyke, Mary Tyler Moore, Morey Amsterdam and Rose Marie, ran for five seasons after its debut on October 3, 1961. During the final season of production, each of the supporting members of the cast featured in at least one show about their character. In the series finale, entitled "The Last Chapter", Van Dyke's Rob Petrie finally completed the project he had been working on for five years, the writing of a book, and much of it was a "clip show" featuring film clips of prior episodes. In syndication, however, the last episode shown in rotation would be "The Gunslinger", a Wild West dream that was filmed on March 22 and marked the last appearance of the entire cast.
    • White House Conference on Civil Rights opens.
    • George Harrison sees Ravi Shankar in concert at the Royal Albert Hall, London.
    June 2
    • Surveyor 1 landed in the Oceanus Procellarum (the "Sea of Storms"), 35 miles north of the crater Flamsteed at 2:17:37 a.m. Florida time, after a 63-hour journey, becoming the first American spacecraft to make a soft landing on the Moon, using retrorockets to slow its descent. Hours later, NASA received the first television transmissions from Surveyor. The photos were expected to be sharper than those transmitted from the first probe to make a soft landing on the Moon, Luna 9, which had arrived four months earlier, on February 3. Over the next 11 days, the probe returned 11,240 photographs of the Moon to Earth before the transmission batteries failed on July 13.
    • Éamon de Valera is re-elected as Irish president.
    • Four former cabinet ministers including Évariste Kimba are executed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, for alleged involvement in a plot to kill Mobutu Sese Seko.
    • BBC Television's Top of the Pops is the first British programme to screen the 'Paperback Writer' and 'Rain' promotional films.
    June 3
    • After several postponements, Gemini 9 was launched into orbit at 9:39 a.m. from Cape Kennedy carrying astronauts Thomas P. Stafford and Eugene A. Cernan, but was not able to dock with the Augmented Target Docketing Adapter (ATDA) that replaced the Agena vehicle, after discovering that the ATDA's shroud had not jettisoned.
    • Joaquín Balaguer is elected president of the Dominican Republic.
    • The British weekly pop newspapers carry whole-page advertisements for 'Paperback Writer', sporting the 'Butcher' picture.


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Gloria," Them (7 weeks)
    • "Leaning on the Lamp Post," Herman's Hermits (8 weeks)
    • "Nothing's Too Good for My Baby," Stevie Wonder (7 weeks)
    • "Secret Agent Man," Johnny Rivers (11 weeks)
    • "Shapes of Things," The Yardbirds (11 weeks)
    • "Time Won't Let Me," The Outsiders (15 weeks)
    • "(You're My) Soul and Inspiration," The Righteous Brothers (13 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Popsicle," Jan & Dean

    (#21 US)

    "He," The Righteous Brothers

    (#18 US)

    "Little Girl," Syndicate of Sound

    (#8 US)

    "Along Comes Mary," The Association

    (#7 US)

    "Hanky Panky," Tommy James & The Shondells

    (#1 US the weeks of July 16 and 23, 1966; #39 R&B; #38 UK)

    _______

    Timeline entries are quoted from the Wiki pages for the month or year and Mark Lewisohn's The Beatles Day by Day, with minor editing as needed.

    _______

    Doesn't seem like nearly as much of a curve ball now. More like a continuity patch.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2021
  19. scotpens

    scotpens Professional Geek Premium Member

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    The Left Coast
    They matured and changed with the times. Some of the banter routines they did on their variety show are actually pretty funny. And Cher was so damn gorgeous. :adore:
     
  20. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
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    RJDiogenes of Boston
    One of the all-time classics.

    Retro now, maybe, but cutting edge at the time. Thank you, I'm here all week. Don't forget to try your waitress and tip the beef.

    Oh, yeah, I do know this. A happy Summer song, I guess, but it doesn't grab me.

    Wow, okay. I think I've heard this, but I never paid attention. Go for it, guys, but not really my thing.

    Vaguely remembered, and shall remain that way.

    Now here's an Oldies Radio Classic. A very good Summer song.

    An Oldies staple, if not a classic, but far from their best work.

    True enough, but it would be cool to see. "By ze vay, Colonel Hogan-- I knew ev-ree-thing." Salute.

    She was amazing at that age, and her early solo work was personal and charming. My yeesh was about what happened to them both later-- she became a glamour queen and lost that intimate charm, and he left music to become a Right-wing Congress critter.