The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Same here. Another classic band that does not fall among my favorites. The songs I like are basically the ones on that most-well-known list. Is that because they're really good or just because they were in the air when I was a kid? I don't know.

    No, I'm familiar with that one. It's the same song, but sounds different. It's probably just my faulty memory at work.

    Undoubtedly. :rommie:

    Yeah, that might be a little grim. It didn't come up often in the TV show, either-- only once that I can recall offhand.
     
  2. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50th Anniversary Viewing (Part 1)

    _______

    Hogan's Heroes
    "To Russia Without Love"
    Originally aired January 31, 1971
    Burkhalter is present for Colonel Becker's visit, which he makes while on his way to Berlin. The German officers invite Hogan to dine with them in the hopes of destroying morale with Becker's tales of the glorious Russian front. And of course LeBeau makes the dinner...while Schultz savors tasting the wine. While Burkhalter and Klink go to select another bottle, Becker and Hogan find themselves alone for a bit, and Becker makes his offer. Not trusting Becker's motives, Hogan and Newkirk try to steal his briefcase, but Becker catches them in the act, and proceeds to blackmail Hogan into cooperating with his plan. Hogan thinks that it's worth pursuing anyway, as he feels that Becker's intel could change the war.

    So he devises a scheme to get Klink to request a transfer, which involves an underground operative named Olga (Ruta Lee), who visits posing as an acquaintance of Becker's to back up Hogan's tales of how things are actually more luxurious on the front than advertised, including ski resorts and hot springs. Klink immediately puts in his request to Burkhalter, who thinks that the kommandant is out of his mind and won't entertain the idea of sending him; so Hogan has Klink effect a "blood-and-guts" persona, which convinces the general of Klink's suitability for the assignment a little too easily. But once Becker gets his assignment, he refuses to hold up his end of the bargain, and threatens to expose Hogan's operation...but he does so alone in the barracks, so the prisoners nab him and put him in the tunnel with the intent of smuggling him to England. Outside, a downtrodden Schultz is about to drive Klink away, but an apparently coincidental sidecar mishap causes the two of them to crash separately, and Burkhalter to change his mind.

    Burkhalter: If I sent you two clowns to the Russian front, I would be shot for treason!​

    In the coda, the prisoners arrange for Schultz to think that Becker has been killed while inspecting the land mines.

    DIS!missed!

    _______

    The Ed Sullivan Show
    Season 23, episode 19
    Originally aired January 31, 1971
    As represented in The Best of the Ed Sullivan Show

    Brooks does a ventriloquist routine under the pseudonym Danny with a dummy named Dave. This is obviously supposed to be poking fun at ventriloquism, as Brooks doesn't even try to hide his mouth movements; makes a point of dropping the dummy face-down on the stage while smoking a cigarette and having a phone conversation; and gives the dummy a glass of water while he sings.

    And that's all I have from this date, whatever else may have been in the original broadcast.

    _______

    Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In
    Season 4, episode 20
    Originally aired February 1, 1971
    Dan's now sporting a beard in some of the segments...the cocktail party not being one of them:


    The Mod World of Aviation:

    Part Two

    Edith Ann on having babies:


    The Quickies:


    Teresa and Johnny do a soul-pop news song (couldn't find a clip).

    _______

    All in the Family
    "Archie Gives Blood"
    Originally aired February 2, 1971
    The first half of the episode has the family playing Monopoly, with Archie bullying Edith not to take advice from Mike and Gloria. Trying to remember a saying that she heard on TV, Edith references Mannix, The Bold Ones, and Marcus Welby. The subject of Mike and Archie going to the blood bank comes up, and it's because his blood might be given to a radical that Archie doesn't want to donate. Mike and Gloria try to explain how the bank works anonymously, and how blood is interchangeable regardless of race; while Archie insists that there's good blood and bad blood. Edith goes into a shaggy dog story about how, after an accident involving an ice truck when she was a girl, she received blood from the same donor who days later gave blood to Katharine Hepburn.

    Gloria: Something's wrong with the story, Ma.​

    On another subject, Archie mentions having served in the Big War--not sure if that's come up before.

    The second half takes us to the blood bank. Archie's skepticism about the color-blindness of the bank comes up when Archie sees an Asian American doctor (an uncredited James Hong). Archie is insisting to Mike that different races have different blood banks when Lionel walks in. Archie assumes that he's just there to do an odd job, and Lionel plays along, teasing Archie about the ridiculousness of him and Archie having the same blood. (The "recorded before a live audience" thing becomes noticeable when O'Connor holds a line during a sustained burst of laughter.) The subject of heart transplants also comes up, and Lionel continues to put Archie on.

    Finally, Archie goes back to donate, and makes a big show of being brave about it while attempting to chat up the nurse (Jeannie Linero). He doesn't even notice when the needle's put in or taken out, but faints when he sees the bag of his own blood. Back at home, Archie insists that one arm is now different from the other because of the blood they took out of it. An argument ensues about modern medicine vs. God's will, with Archie insisting that a heart donor would find himself in Heaven with a hole in his chest.

    The coda has Archie back to getting annoyed at Edith over Monopoly.

    _______

    Hawaii Five-O
    "F.O.B. Honolulu (Part 2)"
    Originally aired February 3, 1971
    Following a 5-1/2-minute recap and the opening credits, Jonathan Kay is furious at Steve for some reason over Commander Nicholson turning out to be crooked. Kay gets a call from Nicholson, asking for $2 million and amnesty for the plates. Over another meal, Soviet agent Misha makes a counter-offer to Nicole Fleming of $2.5 million. Nicole later gets a call from Wo Fat making a final offer of $3 million. In the meantime, Steve has Tony Madrid, who's no longer of any use to Wo Fat, brought in to press him for Fat's location.

    Fleming dons a disguise in an elevator to shake her Five-O tails. Misha finds that she's also tied up a tail of his, an old lady who tended to be seen knitting within sight of Fleming at her hotel (Peggy Oumansky, I presume). McGarrett surmises that while Nicholson is motivated to get his amnesty, Fleming is only interested in the money. Fleming makes a rendezvous with Nicholson and he shows her the plates. While they're kissing, she pulls out a pistol, shoots him several times, and takes them.

    While Steve is deducing Wo Fat's location based on tar found on the tires of Nicholson's hideout trailer, we glimpse, for the first time, an assembly of his daylit Lucite maps:
    H545.jpg
    Fleming meets with Fat and only produces the front plate, with instructions for locating the back; but he strongarms her into accompanying him. Steve approaches Misha with an offer of cooperation, and Misha produces a clue he found at the hotel: an imprint in a notepad of what appears to be a map. McGarrett matches it to a section of one of his Lucite maps, indicating Byodo-In Temple. Fleming takes Fat there and produces the plate from a larger Buddha, but they're confronted at gunpoint by Madrid, who's killed Fat's henchman. While Fleming is trying to persuade Madrid to take her with him, Fat makes a move and is shot. Madrid attempts to flee but exchanges fire with Five-O and ends up falling off a bridge into...does a pool at a temple qualify as "the drink"? Steve discovers that Fat has slipped away despite copious fake blood loss from his wound, and delivers the plates to Kay. The episode ends with Steve seeing Misha off at the airport.

    _______

    From this point, because of some real-life, here-and-now business, I'll be separated from my DVR for a while, so I'll be continuing review business with the shows that I have access to remotely, and catch up with the others later.

    _______

    You've got me, then...I'm not familiar with any other versions of Paul's "Woman"...don't think I've ever even heard his demo, which I'm sure is out there in Beatle Bootlegland.

    It was that example that I was evoking.
     
  3. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    War is hella good.

    I wonder who they used.

    He's got a bright future in radio. Worked for Edgar Bergin, after all.

    It comes and goes during the same show? Awkward. :rommie:

    Neil Sedaka would agree.

    They revisit the idea of blood transfusions later on a couple of times in quite an interesting way.

    I wonder what the recipient would look like. :rommie:

    There's his amnesty.

    How many criminals have been sent to the hoosegow because of notes on hotel note pads?

    Whoa.

    The Holy Drink.

    Presumably Fleming survived and is the one who shot Fat-- I wouldn't want to be in her shoes.

    My memory's playing tricks on me, that's all.
     
  4. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50th Anniversary Viewing (Part 2)

    _______

    The Brady Bunch
    "Our Son, the Man"
    Originally aired February 5, 1971
    The episode opens with Greg annoyed at the other kids for carrying on while he's on the phone. He starts referring to the others as kids and himself as a man; starts shaving; asks not to go on the family campout; and requests his own room. Mike wants to honor his request; Carol suggests the den, while Mike wants it to be the family room, but relents, moving his work paraphernalia into the family room. Greg is really pleased with his new digs, which he thinks he can turn into a real groovy scene. While Greg moves into his new pad, the other kids tease him...the boys refusing to help him haul his mattress because they're "just kids," and the girls declining from visiting his "inner sanctum" because they don't want to disturb his privacy. Greg nevertheless gets the place all hippie'd up.

    At school, Greg tries to chat up the girl he's interested in, and things go awkwardly. Then her hip boyfriend shows up, making Greg feel inadequately attired, so he hits up Mike for a loan so he can invest in a groovy new wardrobe. He affects a new vocabulary to go with it, but crosses a line when he addresses his parents by their given names. He approaches the girl at school again, and noting his attempts, she makes her comment about how he's still growing up. Subsequently unable to get in on anything "heavy" with the other guys, he watches as the rest of the family starts leaving for the camping trip. When Mike goes back in to give him some money, they have a talk about the new perspective Greg has gained, and he asks to go on the camping trip after all.

    In the coda, Mike's den is back to normal, and he's designing a house for the family with eight bedrooms.

    Random Alice physical comedy beat: she gets stuck in a sleeping bag while they're being prepped in the backyard.

    _______

    The Odd Couple
    "Engrave Trouble"
    Originally aired February 5, 1971
    Felix is initially enthusiastic to go out on a double date with Oscar, but falls into depression when he hears a song that reminds him of his anniversary with Gloria. After the date that he doesn't go on, Felix tells Oscar about the watch that he gave Gloria for their first anniversary, which she didn't like because the engraving was less than romantic. Oscar gives him the idea of regifting it with a better engraving: the title of the song, "Just One More Chance". Oscar calls Gloria and arranges the date, which looks hopeful, but gets Felix all wound up about preparing for it. When Oscar and Felix go Louie, the pawn shop owner who's doing the engraving (Herb Vigran), they find him tied up after having been robbed. Felix falls back into depression, listening to the song over and over again.

    Oscar calls in favors to get in touch with an underworld contact named Bill Green (Michael Constantine), who runs a dog kennel. He initially doesn't want to get involved for the paltry sum that Oscar and Felix are willing to pay to get the watch back, but is moved when Felix shows him the pictures in his wallet--particularly those of Felix and Gloria's dog. He arranges for the watch to be left in an elevator, where Oscar and Felix eventually find it after assuming that they had to make contact with somebody riding the elevator. But we learn afterward that Felix's date with Gloria was ruined because the person who stole the watch had it re-engraved with a much cruder message for his girlfriend.

    In the coda, we learn that the watch has been stolen again, from Gloria, with a note left about feeding the dog indicating that Green was the culprit.

    _______

    Mission: Impossible
    "The Catafalque"
    Originally aired February 6, 1971
    The Fuegos are paying respects to Ramone's father, who's being kept in a glass coffin, apparently in a vacuum, while Doug and Barney spy on the changing of the guard from above. Paris, posing as an escaped prisoner, holds Ramone at gunpoint, claiming that his father has been imprisoned in a place called the bastion for twenty years because he'd tried to prevent the execution of Ramone's father at the order of Miguel. Barney and Doug break into the rodent-infested bastion--a prison that hasn't been used for sixty years--and get to work with their gear. Dana hits Ramone's car with a yellow Corvette while parking and hits on him in a very forward manner, which he responds to. At her place she switches his gun via a trick table while making out with him; then Doug storms in with a gun pretending to be her jealous husband, Ramone fake shoots him, and some repertory police threaten to arrest him and knock him out with the trick ring.

    Ramone wakes up in a cell in the bastion and it becomes clear that he's being framed and coerced to sign a confession, with Secret Police Captain Jim telling him that his uncle is behind the frame-up. While Miguel looks into his nephew's whereabouts, Barney and Doug very quietly use winches to bring the glass coffin up into the rafters of the viewing chamber and switch it without alerting the guards who are surrounding the coffin but looking away from it! In the bastion, Paris in old age makeup burrows through the wall into Ramone's cell, pretending to be the father of the escaped prisoner, and claiming to have hidden a diary with the truth about Ramone's father's death. They burrow out together through another wall, but once Ramone knows how to get out, he seals Paris back in and proceeds on his own. Young Paris shows up to aid in his escape and takes him to a hideout, where Ramone tells him that his father died while helping him escape. When Paris tells him how Old Paris was a sculptor, Ramone realizes that his father's body was replaced with a wax figure, and he and Paris barge into the chamber and retrieve the diary from it. The diary tells them that Ramone's father is alive and being kept in a sanitarium, so they barge in there with a gun and Ramone tries to talk to his repertory father, who's now in a fake vegetative state.

    Ramone vows revenge, and Paris steers him into stealing the treaty for blackmail purposes. They sneak into Miguel's office and Ramone retrieves it from its hand-scan-unlocked vault. Paris sneaks out with the treaty just before Miguel comes in and Ramone realizes what he's done. Mission: Accomplished.

    I found this one to be particularly hard to swallow...both for the coffin-switching, and for how much it relied on one character being really gullible.

    _______

    The Mary Tyler Moore Show
    "Hi!"
    Originally aired February 6, 1971
    When it comes out that Mary's taking off work to go to the hospital, Ted assumes she's getting a nose job. She doesn't want to tell Lou what she's going in for, but he insists for the paperwork. She's embarrassed about it, but also nervous; and the others quickly find out. Rhoda makes a point of teasing Mary about it...and swaps her nightgown for a skimpy nightie, which informs the first impression of Mary's snarky roommate, Loretta Kuhne (Pat Carroll), who's there for an ulcer but is also recovering from a broken leg. When she finds out that Loretta watches Ted Baxter for laughs, Mary says that she's a stewardess. After the operation, Rhoda, Lou, and Murray all bring Mary ice cream, which she's already been eating all day; while Loretta gets a visit from the boyfriend whom Mary assumes is her husband, Bert (Bruce Kirby). Then Ted comes in while the curtain's closed, and Loretta yells for Mary to turn down the TV because she doesn't feel like hearing that idiot. When she's about to leave, Mary tries to make one last gesture of friendship toward Loretta, which is initially rebuffed but then accepted. In the coda, Mary learns that Bert isn't the husband with whom Loretta's been having problems.

    _______

    I didn't even get the impression that there was a body. They just remote-detonated a mine.

    Madrid shot Fat...he had a gun on both of them.
     
  5. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Next week: Greg continues to be constantly teased by the other kids during the long, long drive to the campground.

    A Brady's home is his castle.

    The principal on Room 222.

    Probably should have just bought a new watch to begin with. :rommie:

    If anything went awry with that switch, Doug would have had quite a surprise.

    Their security measures are not as airtight as their coffins, apparently. :rommie:

    There is a slight resemblance.

    At least they're back to international intrigue.

    That would be my first guess.

    Are tonsillectomies embarrassing?

    Ah, I remember this episode. :rommie:

    Ah, okay.
     
  6. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    I'd meant to provide some visual aids:
    TBB09.jpg
    TBB10.jpg
    Also, MeTV just showed this one, and other recently reviewed episodes, this past Sunday. And they showed Adam-12, "Elegy for a Pig," this week.

    There was probably a signal, maybe built into the trick table.

    It's a procedure associated with children.
     
  7. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    That's a pretty groovy pad. I wonder how a kid who's always asking his dad for spending money was able to finance it. I sense an Adam-12 crossover coming up.

    I've got to pay more attention to those capsule descriptions.

    One would hope. :rommie:

    That's right, I forgot about that. That was a fairly common plot back in the day.
     
  8. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    55 Years Ago This Week



    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Attack," The Toys (9 weeks)
    • "It Was a Very Good Year," Frank Sinatra (8 weeks)
    • "My Generation," The Who (5 weeks)
    • "Sandy," Ronny & The Daytonas (11 weeks)
    • "You Didn't Have to Be So Nice," The Lovin' Spoonful (12 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Shake Me, Wake Me (When It's Over)," Four Tops

    (#18 US; #5 R&B)

    "This Old Heart of Mine (Is Weak for You)," The Isley Brothers

    (#12 US; #6 R&B; #47 UK)

    "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry," B. J. Thomas & The Triumphs

    (#8 US)

    "Time Won't Let Me," The Outsiders

    (#5 US)

    "Listen People," Herman's Hermits

    (#3 US)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • The Ed Sullivan Show, Season 18, episode 22
    • Branded, "Barbed Wire"
    • 12 O'Clock High, "Twenty-Fifth Mission"
    • Batman, "A Riddle a Day Keeps the Riddler Away"
    • Batman, "When the Rat's Away the Mice Will Play"
    • Gilligan's Island, "Forward March"
    • The Wild Wild West, "The Night of the Whirring Death"
    • Get Smart, "Smart, the Assassin"

    _______

    He's been on the show before, he knows the drill. Say, maybe he's really the boy king from that M:I episode, and is actually supporting the familly. Yeah, Mike's an "architect"...
     
  9. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Not bad. Somehow sounds like Chairman of the Board to me.

    Classic.

    Another song that's hard to kill.

    Nice Oldies Radio mainstay.

    I forgot about this one. It's okay.

    Hmm. Have Alice and Paris ever been seen together in the same room? I don't think so....
     
  10. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    50 Years Ago This Week



    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Immigrant Song," Led Zeppelin (13 weeks)
    • "I Think I Love You," The Partridge Family (19 weeks)
    • "Mother," John Lennon / Plastic Ono Band (6 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Eighteen," Alice Cooper

    (#21 US; #482 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time)

    "Free," Chicago

    (#20 US)

    "You're All I Need to Get By," Aretha Franklin

    (#19 US; #3 R&B)

    "I Don't Know How to Love Him," Helen Reddy
    (#13 US; #12 AC)

    "Oye Como Va," Santana

    (#13 US; #11 AC; #32 R&B)

    "What's Going On," Marvin Gaye

    (#2 US; #1 R&B; #4 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, Season 4, episode 22
    • All in the Family, "Gloria's Pregnancy"
    • Hawaii Five-O, "Dear Enemy"
    • Ironside, "Love, Peace, Brotherhood and Murder"
    • Adam-12, "Log 76: Militants"
    • The Brady Bunch, "Lights Out"
    • The Partridge Family, "Partridge up a Pear Tree"
    • That Girl, "That King"
    • The Odd Couple, "You've Come a Long Way, Baby"
    • Love, American Style, "Love and the Boss / Love and the Jury / Love and the Logical Explanation / Love and the Pregnancy"
    • Mission: Impossible, "Kitara"
    • The Mary Tyler Moore Show, "A Friend in Deed"

    _______

    I'm not hearing that, but it is one of their "in-between" singles. Enjoyable, but it lacks the punch of their stronger hits.

    Interestingly, in the Isleys' sporadic collection of major hits, this was their first Top 40 single since 1962, when it was a little song called "Twist and Shout"...

    The 1949 original by Hank Williams is chronologically the oldest song on the Rolling Stone 500 Greatest Songs list (#111).

    Yep.

    Oldies radio definitely seems to have decided to weed out several of the Hermits' more successful singles.

    Would that be "and Leonard Nimoy as Ann B. Davis as Alice," or "and Ann B. Davis as Leonard Nimoy as Alice"?
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2021
  11. Nerys Myk

    Nerys Myk Cartoon Premium Member

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    How'd that work out? ;)
     
  12. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Gotta keep the iconic house...the interior set already doesn't fit in the exterior, so I've read. But a previous bit of web searching brought up multiple examples of fan floorplans trying to do so.
     
  13. Nerys Myk

    Nerys Myk Cartoon Premium Member

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    There was a home reno mini series where they redid the house used for the exterior to match the sets. Though they had to fudge a little as the house is a one story.
     
  14. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    I like this, but I'm surprised that it's even on the Greatest Songs list. It's like his beginner song.

    Chicago has done better.

    Ditto. The r-e-s-p-e-c-t was too much.

    From Superstar. A good cover.

    Now that's the stuff.

    And here's one that deserves its high ranking.

    Interesting. I didn't realize they went back that far.

    How dare they?!?

    [​IMG]

    Mike must have designed the Jupiter II as well. :rommie:
     
  15. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    50th Anniversary Album Spotlight

    John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band
    John Lennon
    Released December 11, 1970
    Chart debut: December 26, 1970
    Chart peak: #6 (January 30, 1971)
    #22 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time (2003)
    This album I've had in my collection for decades, since the late days of vinyl. A less commercial predecessor to the 1971 Imagine album (which covers similar ground in a generally more palatable fashion), it is John's solo masterpiece...raw, powerful, and insightful, but not a pleasant, easy listen.


    The album opens in an unapologetically raw fashion with "Mother," which was issued in edited form as a single (charted Jan. 9, 1971; #43 US):

    While it serves as an honest introduction to the album, it was far from the work's most commercially appealing track.

    Things take a more pleasantly mellow turn with "Hold On," which includes TV junkie John endearingly giving a shout-out to Sesame Street.

    The album then rocks things up with the iconoclastic "I Found Out".
    Now that I showed you what I been through
    Don't take nobody's word what you can do
    There ain't no Jesus gonna come from the sky
    Now that I found out I know I can cry

    ...
    Old Hare Krishna got nothing on you
    Just keep you crazy with nothing to do
    Keep you occupied with pie in the sky
    There ain't no guru who can see through your eyes

    Of particular note, John takes his first direct shot at Paul on this track...which will prove to be the opening salvo of the infamous back-and-forth spat on their subsequent albums.

    John goes full Dylan with one of the album's best-known tracks, the F-bomb-laden "Working Class Hero":

    They hurt you at home, and they hit you at school
    They hate you if you're clever, and they despise a fool
    Till you're so fucking crazy, you can't follow their rules

    ...
    Keep you doped with religion and sex and TV
    And you think you're so clever and classless and free
    But you're still fucking peasants as far as I can see


    I don't know if it had hit single chops, but side one's closer, "Isolation," would be one of the more radio-friendly tracks on the album, being a mostly gentle piano ballad with a cathartic middle section:


    I don't expect you to understand
    After you've caused so much pain
    But then again, you're not to blame
    You're just a human, a victim of the insane

    The second side opens with the catchily upbeat "Remember".

    Next is easily the album's prettiest track, "Love," with its simple but poetic lyrics and gentle opening and closing fades:


    This is strongly contrasted by "Well Well Well," a sort of parallel rocker to "I Found Out," which, like "Mother," features John going into full primal mode.

    "Look at Me" is another particularly gentle track, the composition of which dates back to when the Beatles were with the Maharishi in 1968...hence the similar finger-picking acoustic guitar style (which John learned from Donovan while in India) to such White Album tracks as "Dear Prudence" and "Julia". Lyrically, it's perhaps John's most vulnerable moment on the album.

    The album climaxes with John's sweeping, definitive closing statement, "God," in which he disavows a litany of past influences:


    In a manner reminiscent of Abbey Road, the album closes with a simple, fragmentary song, "My Mummy's Dead," for which the album uses a raw demo recording.

    _______

    Interesting solution they came up with! I'm also impressed that they so faithfully recreated the stones.

    Alice Cooper (actually the band name) is one of those artists whom I was familiar with by name, but found that I wasn't very familiar with much of their work as I was adding charting singles to my collection. The album that "[I'm] Eighteen" is on, Love It to Death, is also on the RS album list, so I assume that the people who contribute to the lists thought that AC was bringing something distinctive/influential to the table at this point.

    Yeah, this isn't a particularly memorable one, surrounded by much better-known classic hits.

    A decent but completely unnecessary cover.

    I'm passing on getting this one, but tentatively planning to get the Yvonne Elliman version from the actual soundtrack.

    Si.

    Definitely a times-sign-y classic. The album, which also ranked high on the original version of its RS list (and tops the new version), will also be coming up in due time.

    I don't think they want back far enough, from some of the stuff that I was exposed to partially via the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame list, which goes back to the late '20s. There are several R&B songs of particular interest in the late '40s and early '50s that are very much early rock 'n' roll before it became recognized as a new genre.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2021
  16. Nerys Myk

    Nerys Myk Cartoon Premium Member

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    Incredible album.
     
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  17. Nerys Myk

    Nerys Myk Cartoon Premium Member

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    To expand, John often hits his creative stride when he goes deep and personal and yet I've found it easy to relate to what he's writing about. Paul on the other hand writes great story songs, which I see as his forte. Of course there are plenty examples of the opposite being true. :lol:
     
  18. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    John, on his game, was more ambitious and hit higher highs. Paul, on his game, could just create great, memorable pop songs. Both could be pretty terrible at their most indulgent in their solo careers, without having each other as bullshit filters. Paul's terrible was generally more goofily listenable, at least.
     
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  19. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    On that last note, I should add that I've always had a big, fat soft spot for Wild Life, which is generally considered to be one of Paul's worst albums. :whistle:

    John & Yoko's Some Time in New York City, OTOH...practically unlistenable.
     
  20. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Lennon was an artist first and an entertainer second, while Paul was an entertainer first and an artist second-- and that created the magic of the Beatles. Of course, it helps that he was an artistic genius.

    His intolerance of other artists is not his most engaging feature.

    An FM classic.

    He lost me at Zimmerman. :rommie: He definitely seems to be a man of extremes. I never met him, of course, but he strikes me as the kind of guy who gets a couple of drinks in him and corners you at a party, and then you spend the rest of your life avoiding him even though you agree in principal with a lot of what he says. I find the comment from his therapist interesting, that they didn't have time to put him back together.

    He did actually become Alice Cooper eventually.

    That seems likely. While I like his Horror Burlesque style (Marvel actually did an Alice Cooper comic around 1980 that was done in the old EC style, and it was great), I only really like a handful of his songs. And my favorites are a couple of ballads.

    I would give my highest recommendation to the complete soundtrack. It's one of the most epic, in the true sense of the word, creations of the 20th century, if not all time, both lyrically and musically.

    I'd be happy if they encompassed the entire decade of the 20s, which was like a "little 60s," or preview of the 60s, both culturally and artistically. Basically, it was liberalism's first attempt of the 20th century at making widespread change, until it was sidetracked by history. Then the 60s actually accomplished that widespread change, but was sidetracked by history before it was finished. Now we need liberalism to make a comeback in the 21st century for the next steps.