The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    TGs3e19.jpg
    "My Sister's Keeper"
    Originally aired February 6, 1969
    And for the M*A*S*H fans, the commercial's producer, Mr. McKorkle, is played by McLean Stevenson. The product is a soda appropriately if uncreatively named POP; and therefore Ann's auditioning to be The POP Girl. But there's singing involved...
    The in-story reason for the title is that Terre's character, Rose, is secretly a nun, working odd singing gigs out of habit.
    TGSister.jpg
    Her brother, Tony, plays her brother, Tony, a drummer who finds the gigs for her. You can definitely see the resemblance to Dad in Tony...
    TGBrother.jpg
    ...and hear the resemblance in Terre, who's more soft-spoken than Marlo is as Ann.

    Donald finds out the truth about Rose first and cracks up because he was trying to talk Ann out of meddling with Rose's career prospects. So he arranges for Ann to see Rose singing in habit at her parochial school without telling her what it's about in advance.

    Ann literally bumps into her father the Father in the hall.

    Ann: Oh! Oh, excuse me, Father!
    Father: Oh, that's all right, my child.​

    TGFather.jpg

    "Oh, Donald" count: 4
    "Oh, Mr. McKorkle" count: 1
    "Oh, Rose" count: 1

    _______

    The Wild Wild West
    "The Night of the Sabatini Death"
    Originally aired February 7, 1969
    Having previously only seen the end of the episode, I didn't know that Backus was in it as well.

    The dying Sabatini (Ted de Corsia) wants West's help to protect a young blind woman he's been taking care of on the side who later (and unsurprisingly) turns out to be his secret daughter. He has a mystery gift for her hidden in the town of Calliope, which Jim and Ned suspect is the Army payroll that was stolen by an officer named Nolan and is believed to be hidden somewhere in that town. The bait for Jim is the opportunity to nab a man named Harry Boorman, who's sure to come after Jim because he's after the money. The catch is that Sabatini dies from a curare-filled cigarette before he can tell Jim the full details of how to find the gift. Jim just knows that he needs to give a key to a man named Swanson.

    Swanson turns out to be the funeral director of the mostly abandoned town, and Jim meets him while he's lying in an open casket. In a later scene he finds Swanson lying in it for good, before Swanson has had a chance to tell him more about the gift. In mingling with the townsfolk, including an unfriendly sheriff (Thomas A. Geas), Jim meets an old woman who's obviously a younger woman in makeup and is claiming to be Nolan's sister (Bethel Leslie)...but I guess it's at least as convincing as Artie's disguises.

    In the meantime Brown meets the girl, Sylvia (Jill Townsend), and once she's in Calliope, goes looking for a Madonna statue that's supposed to be connected to the gift and finds the crypt where Nolan's supposed to be entombed, which the key opens. The engraving of Nolan's face reveals that he was Sabatini. Eventually everybody gets to the tomb, which includes the whole population of Calliope, who were in cahoots with Boorman (Don "Red" Barry) and his ladyfriend in scheming to find the payroll. Jim and Ned take down the baddies and it turns out that the treasure in the crypt is a will entitling Sylvia to all of the Nolan properties in the area.

    Honestly, this one was pretty underwhelming...too much filler dragging out a fairly predictable plot and nothing in the way of nifty Old West spy fi business. And I'm afraid to say that I wasn't terribly taken by Hale as Ned Brown. Pike was a more convincing substitute Artie, though they lampshaded that by establishing that Brown was in the chemistry section and being recruited on the spot to get involved in the mission...but on the other hand, they didn't do enough with that angle, making it seem like he was a perfectly competent field agent once he was on the job....if not as big on disguises as Jim's usual partners. The only moment that passes for a disguise angle is Brown dropping a false name.

    But of course, we did get the cute Gilligan's Island gag in the train coda. There used to be a clip of it on YouTube, but I couldn't find it.

    And that'll be it for The Wild Wild West until such a time as Me changes its Stoogey ways.

    _______

    Really early '70s...like, pre-'70s.

    But not terribly memorable either.

    Kinda has an '80s vibe for me. Were you familiar with the R.E.M. version?


    Which book would that be?
     
  2. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    As in "wearing civvies" or "just can't stop?"

    She should have made room for daddy... er, the Father.

    No "Oh, god"s?

    And I forgot about that.

    But... but.... but.... it's the Skipper! :(

    Well, it would take a big disguise to disguise that physique. :rommie:

    Fingers crossed for that.

    I was going to say no, but it does sound kind of familiar when I listen to it.

    The article that you linked to is actually an excerpt from a book. Which is now on my Kindle.
     
  3. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    That's an interesting point, and they were kings at it, with "Goin Out of My Head" being the jewel in their crown.

    ...and that would have lent itself to jokes, if not for the sheer brilliance of the writing/performances.

    Odd, since that was decade where nearly every major solo and group act were well exposed on TV (a few with their own shows), and others appearing on the big screen. One would think those who did not want to appear on film would be more than aware of the power of film by 1969.

    When was the last time a song specifically composed for a soap opera hit it big on the charts?
     
  4. Nerys Myk

    Nerys Myk Kang, now with ridges Premium Member

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    I see Danny in Terre's face too. Not so much in Marlo's.
     
  5. J.T.B.

    J.T.B. Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    If you saw Marlo's original nose you might.
     
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  6. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Guess I should have said "sans habit".

    :D

    That would be the George Burns episode.

    Yeah, her too.

    Interesting...didn't know she had an even older nose....
     
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  7. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Puns are my habit. :rommie:
     
  8. J.T.B.

    J.T.B. Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    The more you know...
    m_thomas.png
     
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  9. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    TS01a.jpg
    "The World Beater"
    Originally aired February 9, 1969 (UK)
    Series finale
    Simon's playing test driver for a race car being developed by a friend, George Hapgood (James Kerry). After the car crashes because of sabotage, he's recruited to drive another car in development for a rival of Hapgood's, Justin Pritchard (John Ronane). I wasn't clear on whether Pritchard was responsible for the sabotage, but it sure seemed like it. Pritchard's working with Kay Collingwood (Patricia Haines), an old acquaintance of Simon's who claims to be employed as a PR consultant, though Simon quickly sniffs out that her real game is industrial espionage, which includes planting bugs everywhere...including in a lapel flower that she gives Simon, which he picks while reciting "she loves me, she loves me not" for her benefit, then tosses out his car window.

    Simon foils a plot by Pritchard to have his own car sabotaged for an insurance claim because it wasn't ready for the would-be investors. Simon keeps the car safe and persuades Kay to accompany him as his navigator in the rally, which he says he intends to win, puttin gher to work digging the car out of mud and such. Simon does indeed win the rally, then reveals that he'd had the exterior of Pritchard's car put over the body of backup car of Hapgood's, which means that Hapgood actually won the rally.

    And that'll be it for the famous Simon Templar, unless I get around to also working in its earlier black & white seasons somewhere.

    _______

    TGs3e20.jpg
    "There Was a Time Ann Met a Pie Man"
    Originally aired February 13, 1969
    This week's freeze frame setup doesn't actually have anyone uttering the words "that girl". As you can tell from the picture, she's not crazy about what the role entails. After asking for Donald's opinion, Ann has a long monologue weighing the pros and cons of taking the part while Donald quietly keeps eating dinner. Ann thanking Donald for telling her exactly what she needs to hear when he doesn't even try to get a word in edgewise becomes a running gag throughout the episode.

    Mr. Grissom: What do you call somebody who won't let you finish a sentence?
    Donald: A woman.​

    The sketch show that the gag appears on, and the pie bit becoming a recurring gag, both seem based on Laugh-In. Ann declines to do a repeat performance herself, but there's talk of other big-name actresses coming on the show to do it, which causes Ann to have a temporary moment of pride in having originated the part.

    Mr. Marie, of course, is every bit as scandalized as Ann and then some, though he seems to have started to warm up to Ann's role by the end, when he realizes that he's getting more business at his restaurant from people coming in to say that they saw Ann.

    Guesting as that show's producer, Mr. Grissom, is Jesse White in his last of four roles for this show. Mrs. Brentano also pops up again.

    "Oh, Donald" count: 6, plus one that sounded like an "Oh, Don," though the closed captioning thought she just said "Donald"
    "Oh, Daddy" count: 3
    "Oh, Mr. Grissom" count: 1

    _______

    There it is! (The nose and the resemblance.)
     
  10. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    :eek:

    Simon must be hard up for work. No wonder his show was cancelled.

    Uh... yay? :rommie:

    He needs a little more excitement in his life. Maybe he'll change his name and go to work for MI-6 or something.

    I didn't realize that getting a pie in the face was so controversial. I guess all those Stooges shorts are hardcore porn in That Girl world. :rommie:
     
  11. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Hmm...why that reaction? What's your take on this?

    He'll have to do some persuading first....

    Apparently it is in Brewster...Ann and her father were very hung up about it.

    From 50 years ago around this time...not sure the exact date the issue hit the stands...the last-panel teaser to a next issue that's easily one of my favorite single issues of a comic book. I love these guys!

    Squadron01.jpg

    Yeah, that's Hyperion in his early short-pants phase! :D
     
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  12. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Just that the show is over. Simon, we hardly knew ye.

    Very interesting. The DVD set is cheap enough, so I could be persuaded to buy it.

    Well, he has legs that just won't quit.
     
  13. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    55 Years Ago This Week


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "I Get Around," The Beach Boys (15 weeks)
    • "Keep on Pushing," The Impressions (13 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Matchbox," The Beatles

    (#17 US; written and originally recorded by Carl Perkins in 1957)

    "Slow Down," The Beatles
    (B-side of "Matchbox"; #25 US; written and originally recorded by Larry Williams in 1957)

    "When I Grow Up (to Be a Man)," The Beach Boys

    (#9 US; #27 UK)

    "Let It Be Me," Betty Everett & Jerry Butler

    (#5 US; #1 R&B; previously a #7 hit for The Everly Brothers in 1960)

    "Last Kiss," J. Frank Wilson & The Cavaliers

    (#2 US)

    "Do Wah Diddy Diddy," Manfred Mann

    (#1 US the weeks of Oct. 17 and 24, 1964; #1 UK)

    Total Beatles songs on the chart: 7

    _______

    Last I checked he was still in This's lineup, if you want to continue for yourself.

    Never seen it myself, but I knew it was Moore's gig between The Saint and Bond.

    Plus a Mjölnir-proof chest...
    Hype01.jpg
    ...and Atomic Vision™!
    Hype02.jpg
     
  14. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Never knew this song made it to No. 1.
    I loved pretty much all of Ringo's solo performances. Boys (my fav of his vocal perfs), Wanna Be Your Man, Honey Don't, Everybody's Trying to Be My Baby, Matchbox, Little Help From My Friends (his best song), all great.
    Always loved this melodramatic little song. Somewhere on my laptop hard drive, I have a live version of it by Pearl Jam in which the band completely screws up the intro.

    They launch into it and you can't tell what they're doing. You then hear them noodling around trying to find it and finally Eddie announces that "they got it now" and they proceed to present a better version of the song than their original recorded version. . Eddie inserts his "brother" into the song in place of the girlfriend. It's rather touching.

    Goes to show that even great bands sometimes screw up live. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2019
  15. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Kind of a random choice....

    ....with a random B-side.

    Another classic. Kind of straightforward, but it doesn't really need to be anything else and it sounds nice.

    Decent cover. It's a song that's hard to damage.

    Another cheerful song about people dying in a car accident. And, yep, it sounds like the 50s.

    A fun classic.

    We do record an occasional Saint if it looks interesting.

    Tony Curtis and Roger Moore fighting crime. The mind boggles.

    Great Argon!
     
  16. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    TGs3e21.jpg
    "The Subject Was Rabies"
    Originally aired February 20, 1969
    Ann suddenly has a new agent, Harry Fields (Jules Munshin), even though she's been dropping references to Seymour as recently as the previous episode. His angle in the episode is that the whole rabies mock-crisis is threatening to keep Ann from making an important audition.

    After Mr. Marie gets bit, Donald gets to be the bearer of bad news when he makes a comment about how it could have been worse, the dog could have been rabid...which gets Lew all wound up on the subject. Ann calls her doctor (Stuart Margolin) for a house call, and he doesn't think anything of the bite either, until Mr. Marie gets him going on the subject of rabies...then he calls the Health Department, seeming very interested in the potential publicity. The inspector who responds to the call is played by TOS guest Ed Peck.

    By the time Mr. Marie's ready to back out, motivated by learning that he'll need to have a shot, the whole incident has become too big to stop...but he's saved when a boy comes by with the dog, which belongs to him and has had its shots.

    Playing a photographer from Donald's magazine:
    TGmisc15.jpg

    I can't help wondering if he's secretly on the trail of our old friend Harry Banner....
    TGHO1.jpg

    "Oh, Donald" count: 1
    "Oh, Daddy" count: 1
    "Oh, Doggy" count: One missed opportunity

    _______

    TGs3e22.jpg
    "The Defiant One"
    Originally aired February 27, 1969
    The setup for the title shot is young David Johnson (George Spell) claiming to the storekeeper that Ann is his mother. Afterward Ann asserts that she's too young...I don't know how much younger Ann was meant to be, but Marlo was easily old enough to be the mother of an eight-year-old at the time.

    Ann assumes that David was stealing the candy bar because he's poor, even though he's pretty well-dressed. He tells her up-front that he lives on Park Avenue and she assumes he's fibbing. Then he tells her what she wants to hear, spinning a story of living in a tenement with thirteen siblings and being beaten by his father.
    Ann takes the boy out for the day, which includes getting odd looks from fellow passengers on a bus. Back at Ann's apartment, he secretly calls his father to tell them that he's been kidnapped and gives him Ann's name and address. Meanwhile, Donald walks into the situation, and Ann gets paranoid about the intentions of the police after she tries calling them.

    Ann: Donald, I told you, they want to put David in Juvenile Hall!
    Donald: Honey, only as a last resort.
    Ann: Donald, that is no resort, it's practically a prison!​

    David's father comes over, and it turns out he's a famous comedian named J.J. Johnson (future Battlestar XO Terry Carter), who understands what's really going on, as David has pulled this sort of thing before.

    In the coda, Ann admits to Donald that she probably wouldn't have bought into David's story so easily if he hadn't been black.

    "Oh, Donald" count: 1; plus one as part of a longer sentence in which she introduces Donald to David, which passes the Johnny Thunder test.
    "Oh, David" count: 2

    _______

    TGs3e23.jpg
    "Fly Me to the Moon"
    Originally aired March 6, 1969
    "She may be the one who helps us put the first woman on the Moon." Well, how's that project been going?

    Guesting Robert Colbert, formerly of The Time Tunnel, as Ann's Boss of the Week, Major Brian James. For her job interview, he
    Flies her in a two-seat jet to New Orleans for lunch. There's a conflict angle with Ann being in the middle of a project to have Donald's apartment redecorated, which her new job is taking her away from, as it involves Major James flying her all over the continent. At one point Donald calls her in their jet via an Air Force radio relay; at another, he's patched in to her while she's in a centrifuge.

    Despite all the attention he's giving her, the major is generally abrupt and unfriendly to Ann. Donald thinks it's a ploy, and Ann's disappointed when that proves not to be the case, but proceeds to tell Donald a lurid story of how he came on to her.

    "Oh, Donald" count: 6 (though one was more of an "Oh! Donald...")

    _______

    Well, Carl Perkins was a huge influence on the Beatles, and Larry Williams was a favorite of John's in particular...John wound up doing three covers of his songs as Beatles releases. "Matchbox" and "Slow Down" are the other songs from the A Hard Day's Night sessions (along with "Long Tall Sally," another cover, and the original "I Call Your Name") that were released in the UK on the Long Tall Sally EP, and thus are found in the digital age on the Past Masters collection. These two were originally released in the states on the most recent Capitol album 55 years ago, Something New.

    And hey, it got Ringo the A-side of a single.

    I know they were speaking for their audience, but it's weird to hear guys in their 20s singing in falsetto voices about growing up to be a man. It sounds alright, but compared to their more stone-cold classics, this one's a "miss" for me.

    It's definitely got a good sound, especially Jerry's voice.

    In other words, another "splatter platter"! Not sure I'd describe it as "cheerful," but I'll agree in this case about it having a '50s vibe.

    Another major British Invasion installment. To show my true age, it always reminds me of Stripes, which was my first exposure to the song.

    From what I glanced at on that Wiki, it sounds like they were fighting each other behind the scenes. I recall on one of his Bond DVD commentaries Sir Roger going on a tangent about an American actor he worked with whom he had words with for being rude to women. I'm guessing that might have been Curtis.

    I liked in Avengers 147-148 when the Supreme version swore by any ol' nobel gas:
    HypeHA.jpg HypeX.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2019
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  17. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    50 Years Ago This Week



    And The Old Mixer is the size of a coconut. Hey, l'il buddy...!


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Mother Popcorn (You Got to Have a Mother for Me), Part 1," James Brown (12 weeks)
    • "My Cherie Amour," Stevie Wonder (14 weeks)
    • "Ruby, Don't Take Your Love to Town," Kenny Rogers & The First Edition (13 weeks)
    • "Walk On By," Isaac Hayes (2 weeks)
    • "What Does It Take (To Win Your Love)," Jr. Walker & The All-Stars (16 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Runnin' Blue," The Doors

    (#64 US)

    "Something in the Air," Thunderclap Newman

    (#37 US; #1 UK)

    "Make Believe," Wind

    (#28 US)

    "Carry Me Back," The Rascals

    (#26 US)

    "Baby It's You," Smith

    (#5 US; originally a #8 hit for the Shirelles in 1961-62; notably also covered by the The Beatles as an album track in 1963)
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2019
  18. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    And, Matchbox charted, which I never imagined. I didn't think any of his songs were released as singles.
    Not one of their best. Did I miss all of those great old Rascals hits somehow? Don't recall seeing any of them on any charts.
     
  19. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    "Yellow Submarine" hit #2 in '66.

    They were already in the middle of their run of major hits (1966-68) when I started posting the chart info two years back. Their last major hit, "People Got to Be Free" (#1), charted July of last year in 50th Anniversaryland.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2019
  20. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    How could I have forgotten this one.