The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    The Saint
    "The Desperate Diplomat"
    Originally aired October 20, 1968 (UK)
    Simon is summoned to the scene of a murder by Inspector Teal. The victim is an accomplice of Jason Douglas, the diplomat who absconded with US aide money meant for the African nation that he was posted in. Whoever committed the murder was obviously looking for something. Jason left a message for Simon, in the form of a lucky coin that each carries as a reminder of an experience that they'd previously shared.

    Simon makes contact with Jason's estranged daughter, Sara, who is soon abducted by the murderers, who want to know where Jason is so that they can grab the money. They use her as a hostage to persuade Simon, thinking that he knows Jason's whereabouts. Once Simon and Sara get out of that situation, they travel to Switzerland, where they have reason to believe that Jason is. Simon grabs himself a quick bit of publicity at the airport to make sure that it gets in the news that he's in the country. Soon Simon contacted by another associate of Jason's, Chatto (Kenneth Gardnier), who directs Simon to the house where Jason is staying.

    Jason, who's dying from wounds he'd taken in his escape from Africa, explains how the US aide was being used to buy luxury items for the new regime, and he wanted to see that it got to the people. The bad guys arrive and take Simon prisoner. Simon and Chatto free themselves and Simon sets a booby trap on the basement stairs for one of his keepers. A gunfight and a car chase ensue. Chatto, who'd been in unconscious in the back of the bad guys' car, wrestles for control of the vehicle with the main bad guy, Faber (Robert Hardy), causing the car to go over a cliff. The money is recovered and Sara plans to return it.

    This was nothing to write home about...a thin story with half-baked bad guys that felt pretty padded. For example, at one point there's a nice bit of business in which Simon attempts to overpower the bad guys after tossing a glass of liquor into a fireplace as a distraction...but his attempt is unsuccessful.

    _______

    The Wild Wild West
    "The Night of the Gruesome Games"
    Originally aired October 25, 1968
    In the teaser, Jim's pursuing said evil scientist, Dr. Raker (Robert Ellenstein), on horseback when Raker sets a booby trap across his path consisting of a box of rockets with a trip wire. Jim and his horsey get through it OK.

    Artie's already embedded in town as an "old" drunk (barely looks middle-aged), who turns rabble-rouser to create a distraction so that Jim can sneak into the closed saloon that Raker was seen entering. Jim enters the upstairs window of a room occupied by actress Lola Cortez (Sherry Jackson!), who seems quite unphased when she comes in half-dressed from the bathroom(!). Jim catches the doctor out in the hall but Raker holds Lola at knifepoint to make his escape. Raker falls to his death, but Jim discovers afterward that he's already sent the vial to the home of a wealthy socialite named Rufus Kraus (William Schallert!). Jim and Artie manage to make the coach that's taking Lola to Kraus's party...Artie now disguised as Raker, who insists that he and Jim were just joshin' back there with the knife.

    I might not have recognized Schallert, as he's in heavy old-age makeup for the role, including a beard. He puts on a colorful performance as the wheelchair-bound elderly gent. Kraus's guests are put off when one of his games involves knocking a player out with a drugged needle, but decide to stick around when they learn that the prizes include rubies, sable, and gold. Meanwhile, Jim gets caught sneaking around upstairs looking for the vial and ends up caged in the basement furnace room. During a game of hide and seek, Artie discovers that the drugged guest was indeed fatally poisoned as he'd originally thought, and has to deal with an exploding doorknob to boot! Lola disappears in a trick cabinet with a chute down to the furnace room, where she aides in Jim's escape via thermite. After they've rejoined the party, Kraus reveals that all of the guests are in his will, but the games are booby-trapped in order to whittle down the heirs...who, under the circumstances, don't seem to mind so much.

    To learn who Raker's accomplice was, Artie takes the place of the temporarily bedridden Kraus, calls off the games, and announces that he knows one of the guests is a murderer. The person who sneaks into Kraus's bedroom to silence Not Kraus is...Dr. Raker, who faked his death by slowing his pulse and breathing. He also reveals that his accomplice is Charity (Helen Page Camp), Kraus's games mistress, who'd been rigging the booby traps to be more deadly than Kraus had intended; and, in a nifty turn, that the vial was hidden in the literal ticking clock in the parlor that Artie had his eyes on all night. By that point the vial is ready to blow any second, so Jim makes good use of that trick cabinet to dispose of the plague in the furnace ASAP.

    In the train coda, Jim and Artie are just coming back from a date with unseen twins...the most bizarre case yet of ignoring a dating opportunity with a perfectly good guest heroine, who in this case was being flirty with Jim throughout the episode.

    Filling in for Red West this week is Lee Kolima as a heavy named No-Fun.

    It's hard not to enjoy an episode with Sherry Jackson and William Schallert in it. For once, it seems like the episode could have been expanded to better play out its colorful premise.

    _______

    Out of crotch, out of mind.
     
  2. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    He should have toppled that regime.

    Sherry Jackson? How could anyone pass up Sherry Jackson?

    :rommie:
     
  3. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    55 Years Ago This Week




    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • Four by the Beatles (EP), The Beatles (3 weeks)
    • "(Just Like) Romeo & Juliet," The Reflections (12 weeks)
    • "Once Upon a Time," Marvin Gaye & Mary Wells (9 weeks)
    • "P.S. I Love You," The Beatles (8 weeks)
    • "Sie Liebt Dich (She Loves You)," Die Beatles (1 week)
    • "What'd I Say," Elvis Presley (6 weeks)

    Re-entering the chart:
    • "Viva Las Vegas," Elvis Presley

    Recent and new on the chart:

    "Hey Harmonica Man," Stevie Wonder

    (June 13; #29 US; #5 R&B)

    "You're My World," Cilla Black

    (#26 US; #4 AC; #1 UK)

    "Tell Me (You're Coming Back)," The Rolling Stones

    (#24 US)

    "Handy Man," Del Shannon

    (#22 US; #36 UK)

    Total positions occupied by Beatles recordings: 1

    _______

    Well it's not like he's a government agent with a license to kill or something.... :shifty:
     
  4. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Kinda lightweight Stevie.

    Probably an average song, but strong nostalgia element for me.

    Kinda lightweight Stones.

    I don't like this song no matter who does it. Sorry, Del.

    He needs stuff on his resume at this point.
     
  5. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50 Years Ago This Week





    And The Old Mixer is the size of a...spaghetti squash? I think they're really scouring the aisles for fresh produce here.


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In," The 5th Dimension (17 weeks)
    • "Atlantis," Donovan (13 weeks)
    • "Day Is Done," Peter, Paul & Mary (10 weeks)
    • "Gitarzan," Ray Stevens (13 weeks)
    • "Oh Happy Day," The Edwin Hawkins Singers feat. Dorothy Combs Morrison (10 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Soul Deep," The Box Tops

    (#18 US; #22 UK)

    "I'd Wait a Million Years," The Grass Roots

    (#15 US)

    "Polk Salad Annie," Tony Joe White

    (#8 US)

    _______

    But...it's Stevie...and he's at the beach! From what I read, I think I like the theme of the album better than this single, which is the only one that deviates from said theme. The album's Wiki page makes its excuses about how still-very-young Stevie was being mismanaged at this stage. We won't be covering another 55th anniversary single from him for a year and a half, but when that comes, we won't be so Uptight, 'cause Everything'll be Alright...perhaps even clean outta sight.

    And a strong Beatles connection, as Cilla was Brian Epstein's pet project. He was her Svenjolly. She enjoyed a substantial string of hits in the UK, but this is all we'll be hearing from her on this side of the pond.

    But awww, they're making it into the Top 40 this time...let's give 'em a pat on the head!

    I take it you're familiar with the Jimmy Jones (1959) and/or James Taylor (1977) version?

    Well, he's also got the "roguish gambler" gig from Maverick.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2019
  6. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Today I'll go to Big Y and ask for a spaghetti squash the size of a 22-week fetus.

    I love this song. I usually repeat it three or four times when it comes up on my playlist. This is one I would have guessed was from the early 70s if asked, though.

    Pretty good. It's got that Grass Roots catchiness.

    Fun song. I'm familiar with it from a live Elvis cassette I had in the early 70s. Elvis pretty much recreated this guy's performance.

    I hope he had a good time. :rommie:

    Now that's Stevie.

    Interesting. For all they were the ultimate phenomenon of the 20th century, the Beatles did not exactly have the Midas touch.

    [​IMG]

    It was James Taylor who ruined it for me.

    His star is definitely on the rise.
     
  7. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Try doing it with an Eastern European accent for added effect.

    Huh...I don't think I was familiar with it before I added it to my collection.

    Now this is a stone-cold oldies radio classic...and one of those that I was surprised didn't do a little better on the charts in its day.

    I've heard that version, but White's was my primary exposure.

    Like they said in their famous first US press conference, if they knew how to recreate what they did, they'd have formed another group and become mangers.

    I almost forgot...he already had prior experience playing Bond at this point. 55th Anniversary British Telly Special:
     
  8. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    One of the most shocking pop/rock music deaths of the decade, not only due to its unexpected nature, but the circumstances surrounding it. As the police arrived at Cotchford Farm and conducted interviews, the conclusion that his death was the result of a "normal drowning" did not find support with Hartfield officer Albert V. Evans, who said he had a "policeman's instinct" that the witnesses did not tell him the whole story, yet he had no hard evidence to move beyond suspicion. The witnesses--Janet Lawson, Jones's then-girlfriend Anna Wohlin and Stones office-contracted builder Frank Thorogood have--according the police--given very contradictory accounts of the how and why of that night.

    Over the years, Keith Richards has flip-flopped on the cause of Jones's death; at some points, he twists the knives, essentially saying Jones was going to end up that way, while at other times, he's compared it the JFK case, in that "you'll never get to the bottom of it."

    Adding to the mystery is former Stones "minder" Tom Keylock (who hired Thorogood on behalf of the Stones' office) making a sworn statement that in November of 1993, Thorogood made a deathbed confession that he killed Jones by holding him under the water. Thorogood's daughter--as expected--denied this event ever took place, but what is a matter record were the heated conflicts between Jones and Thorogood while the latter was hired to work at Cotchford Farm, and Anna Wohlin's statement that after Jones could not be revived, Thorogood did not show any sympathy, stating he was "cold as ice."

    Of the Rolling Stones, only Wyman and Watts attended Jones's funeral; Richards (and Pallenberg) simply would not go, while Jagger (and Marianne Faithful) flew to Australia for Jagger to begin filming his part of the Ned Kelly film. He's used the contract for the film as the reason he did not attend the funeral, but let's be serious here: the producers of the film obviously knew who they were working with, and they also knew his relation to the man who just died, so I doubt they would have complained too much if Jagger delayed the shoot by a couple of days for bereavement reasons. His running off to shoot a movie has been seen as his being (ultimately) dismissive, despite that slapped together little tribute at the Hyde Park show.

    Ok, but nothing really grabbing the ear.

    Such a great track.

    The most authentic version of the song. The same year, another White-penned "story" song, "Rainy Night in Georgia" was released, but the Brooke Benton release from 1970 was where the song earned its popularity.
     
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  9. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50th Anniversary Album Spotlight

    Stand!
    Sly & The Family Stone
    Released May 3, 1969
    Chart debut: April 26, 1969
    Chart peak: #13, June 7, 1969
    #118 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time
    Now we come to an album that's inclusion on the Rolling Stone list is beyond question, serving as it does as a showcase of this band's pioneering of the style of funk that would become an integral part of the music landscape in the coming decade. The one thing I might question is why this album didn't make the top 100 of the list. In my book, it's more clearly deserving of that honor than Odessey and Oracle or Dusty in Memphis.

    The album opens strongly with its memorable, attention-grabbing title track, "Stand!" (charted Apr. 12, 1969; #22 US; #14 R&B; #241 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time):


    In deference to board policy, I won't even be posting a text link to "Don't Call Me N*****, Whitey"...suffice it to say, it delivers its message with a heaping helping of funk. There's a lot going on in this song musically, including what sounds like Sly doing some of his vocoder-filtered scatting.

    Next is their current single 50 years ago this week, the powerful "I Want to Take You Higher" (B-side of "Stand!"; charted May 24, 1969; #60 US; #24 R&B; recharts May 23, 1970, reaching #38 US):

    Their wee-hours performance of this song will be a highlight at Woodstock. There is one mildly annoying bit of business going on in the mix...a low, droning horn, I guess, that sounds distractingly like a vibrating cell phone.

    I'm not sure what to make of the less familiar "Somebody's Watching You"...it has a quirky playful sound, and strikes me as being more "pop" than most of the album.

    The first side closes with the funktastic "Sing a Simple Song" (B-side of "Everyday People"; charted Mar. 8, 1969; #89 US; #28 R&B):

    On the subject of this song reminding someone of the Jackson 5, I read that the Jacksons would cover it (along with much of the rest of the album, it seems).

    Side two opens with the uber-classic hit single that preceded the album, "Everyday People" (charted Nov. 30, 1968; #1 US the weeks of Feb. 15 through Mar. 8, 1969; #1 R&B; #36 UK; #145 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time):

    During the song's time on my weekly playlist, I really fell in love with the line "you can't figure out the bag I'm in". Also, I read this...
    Is this true? It never occurred to me that it might be the case! That's cool if so.

    The bulk of side two is occupied by "Sex Machine," a 13:45 instrumental jam that does have vocals of a sort...Sly scatting through the vocoder.

    The dominant guitar riff in this piece reminds me of "Rocky Mountain Way"...a coincidence, or more of Sly & the Family's influence?

    The album closes with "You Can Make It If You Try," an enjoyable, poppy number, but relatively lightweight compared to most of the album's contents.

    Definitely a worthwhile purchase...and I should note that, as touched upon previously, I went ahead and bought the complete album in spite of everything but "Sex Machine" being on an Essentials compilation that I'd already invested in for the band's singles.


    Next up: Nashville Skyline, Bob Dylan

    _______

    Somehow I knew there'd be a conspiracy angle. I'm not sure one is necessary here...a guy with extreme drug problems is left unattended in a pool. If the last people who saw him couldn't get their stories straight, it's likely because they were as high as he was.

    Pretty much the same for me.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2019
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  10. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Oh, nice touch. "My recipe calls for a 22-week foetus, blah."

    Really? I almost never hear it (or heard it).

    Oh, that's wonderful, and very funny. A couple of parts remind me of his later appearance on Muppet Show. Cute little stumble there, too-- live TV! :rommie:

    Definitely a classic.

    Uber classic indeed. I absolutely love this one. Another sign o' the times that has been lost with generational shift.

    Hah. There's a phrase that I don't even hear used tongue in cheek anymore. "What's your bag, man?" :rommie:

    I'm not sure. It's just always been there as far as my experience goes, and is still used, unlike that other one.

    Well, fine! :rommie: The other weird thing about this song is, not only is it addictive for me, but it's linked in my head to "Silver, Blue, and Gold" by Bad Company, which came out a few years later-- I will often jump from one to the other when one comes up in the playlist.[/quote]
     
  11. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Yet another reason why certain lists are not worth much. It was a great and important album (a rare mix), but if people lack the ears to hear why, then that was their problem. To the culture of the time and in the decades since, this was the equivalent of an earthquake in music, American and elsewhere.

    Between Officer Evans' suspicion of the witnesses, and Anna Wohlin's own statement about Thorogood's behavior right as Jones died, logic points to something other than the proverbial "someone slipped on a rubber duck and took a header into the pool"./ "he was drunk! we told him not to swim!" kinds of causes. The medical examiner full report (rarely accessed) did not find enough of anything to conclude it--beyond the shadow of doubt--contributed to his death, but by law, whatever is found must be reported, hence lazy reporting sold as "fact.".

    A few years ago, documents on the case were submitted to world renowned pathologist Cyril Wecht, and from what he saw, he said if this had occurred in America, the nature of the events/witness statements would have led a district attorney to treat it as a murder case. Two of these people (Evans and Wecht) did not had a personal investment in the case, or ever knew Jones, so their suspicion carries more weight of objectivity than say, oft-repeated summaries based on the media's love of "rock n roll myths" that are as false as Cass Elliot choking on a ham sandwich, Elvis dying while sitting on the toilet eating a fried banana/peanut butter sandwich, or Buddy Holly's gun discharging, causing the plane crash that killed him.
     
  12. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Another example of that odd Boston-area oldies radio playlisting. :p

    You make it sound like it didn't make the list at all. I'm quibbling over the relative positioning of three albums within 40 positions of each other on the list.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2019
  13. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Very likely. I was trying to remember if I heard it on an Oldies station at all, or if it came up on Lost 45s.
     
  14. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    The Saint
    "The Organisation Man"
    Originally aired October 27, 1968 (UK)
    The teaser has Simon seemingly assassinating a man in a public park with a silenced pistol...very uncharacteristic of him, as he rarely even uses a gun. This is part of his initiation into the "organisation" of Jonathan Roper (Britton), an elitist who sees Simon as one of the leaders, like him. Simon is put into military-style training, and takes opportunities to slip away from the group to report to a contact (Mortimer). It turns out that he's working the infiltrate-by-day, report-by-night watch out of British Intelligence, and as expected, his assassination target is alive and well, being an agent named Spode (Norman Bird) who'd been wearing a bulletproof vest. Simon's kilt-wearing drill sergeant, Leander (Glynn Edwards), catches onto his covert activities rather quickly, but Templar manages to evade being caught red-handed.

    Roper assigns Simon to lead a group of his men disguised as a Highland regiment, wearing stolen kilts, who are posing as a prisoner escort to spring an Eastern spymaster, Craddock (Simon Lack), who's being interrogated by British Intelligence nearby. They catch Simon's female contact, Kate Barnaby, spying nearby; but they don't pass muster when inspected by an actual army officer, because they're all wearing their sgian-dubhs on the wrong leg--I didn't catch if this was something that Simon had arranged deliberately. Simon is involved in some gunplay in the climax, and has a sort of pre-Dirty Harry moment, holding a gun on Roper that Roper suspects is empty, but has one bullet in it. True to the show's form, Simon uses it to disarm his foe rather than kill him.

    There's an additional twist in that Spode, who's in charge of the interrogation, opportunistically tries to spring Craddock during the donnybrook for the promise of compensation. When it's all over, Templar is offered Spode's old position, but Simon nominates Kate for the job.

    Well this episode couldn't have come along at a more opportune time, given the recent discussion of Moore's resume. It was definitely a more interesting and Bondian installment.

    _______

    The Wild Wild West
    "The Night of the Kraken"
    Originally aired November 1, 1968
    This episode had me early with Ted Knight chewing the scenery as Daniel, a crazy old man warning everyone about the leviathan. The teaser also features Artie in disguise as a sailor with a crutch...I assumed at first that this was also covering for Ross Martin's injury, but he gets around normally for the rest of the episode.

    We see the Kraken early on, so the mystery of what Lt. Bartlett (Brent Davis) was trying to tell them before he was killed by it suggests that there's something more going on...as does the hostility of gangs of locals who start fights with anyone getting nosy about the situation. Jim befriends one of their targets, a Portuguese fisherman named Aguila (Anthony Caruso), who gets pulled underwater by the tentacle from his boat, but not before Jim cuts a piece of the tentacle that shows that it's artificial.

    Next their main contact, Admiral Hammond (Ford Rainey) is killed by an explosive while trying to tell them something. The agents find a model of an underwater installation that has a connection to the shore. Jim uses an advanced diving helmet that Artie found while snooping around to infiltrate the facility, while Artie gets in via land by posing as a mechanic who shows up at the bar on the other end of the connection to fix the compressor.

    It turns out that Hammond's wife, Dolores (Marj Dusay), and Daniel are in cahoots, with Commander Beech (Jason Evers) as an accomplice. They've taken over the facility, which was built by the admiral, and have been using the tentacle to keep the fishermen away. Their goal is to use a magnetic "missile" (really a mine) to destroy the visiting ironclad Missouri as a demonstration of the facility's military usefulness to an interested party. Jim swims out to redirect the missile to the facility, but somehow isn't caught in the massive underwater explosion that we see.

    The sailing ship that we see a silhouetted profile of doesn't look anything like an ironclad. And the Missouri was only active until 1865, about a decade before the show takes place.

    _______
     
  15. J.T.B.

    J.T.B. Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    Yeah, I agree, but that's lists for you.

    I got into this album in the '80s/my teens when my aunt pointed out to me that Paul Shaffer used a lot of the tracks for commercial breaks on Late Night with David Letterman. "You Can Make It If You Try" and "Sex Machine" never being played on local radio, I had no idea what they were. It's an album I never get tired of.

    No matter how he may have lost it later, Sly had the whole package going on here. Lyrical dexterity, a clear-eyed yet positive thematic vision, solid but light-hearted band chemistry, innovative instrumentation and production.

    Like previous Family records, everybody gets their moment. Greg has a few dialed-in "Funky Drummer"-worthy breaks, in fact I was surprised when I found out that this record pre-dates that one. One of his beats was sampled on a hip-hop hit in the early '90s; the loop was only a few seconds long but I knew it was him.

    Larry's bass is fluid, bubbling, rumbling, popping, jumpy, clean, distorted... one of the unquestionable root influences for the next 50 years of bassists. Rosie is, as always, powerful and sublime as needed. Cynthia's brash, raspy-voiced exuberance is pure salutary authenticity, it's like if she wasn't playing her horn, her energy had to burst out somewhere. God I was sorry when that voice left us.

    I always wondered if the line (Larry sings) "Music's getting longer too" was recognition that the record company would resist their long tracks for singles. And in fact "Higher" was cut down a couple of minutes.

    I'm pretty sure it's a talkbox.

    Well a lot of first-generation ironclads tended to look like "regular" sailing ships and IIRC the ship is only seen at night so no great detail. It's true that the US Navy went wholeheartedly in the Ericsson monitor direction, but they did have at least one broadside type. I'll give them some slack on that one and say an alternate history USN had more ships like that later on, since a lot of WWW anachronisms were so much more egregious.
     
  16. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    I think we got a fan here! :p :techman:

    I don't know the difference, but I was going by the Wiki description of how he was processing his voice in "Sex Machine".

    Still didn't look quite like that...it lacked that distinctly boxy look, and had an upswept bow.

    ETA:
    WWW01.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2019
  17. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    License to kill? He didn't even have his Learner's Permit to kill at this point.

    So these guys' ultimate goal was to overthrow the British government? Any particular ideology, or were they just bored or unemployed?

    There's a lot of good guests on this show.

    Alternate Steampunk universe. It is an odd choice, though, to use an old Confederate ship from the war. The writer, or somebody on the set, probably had a vague memory of an ironclad named Missouri from history class and didn't bother to research it. :rommie:
     
  18. J.T.B.

    J.T.B. Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    A vocoder is an electronic device which can modify vocal input, including mixing it with other instruments, and convert it to a current signal output. A talk-box is an electric-acoustic device which sends audio through a tube which goes into the performer's mouth, allowing the sound to be "shaped" like speech or singing, which sound is then picked up by a vocal microphone.

    See, you can't say there's not iron on the outside of that ship!
     
  19. scotpens

    scotpens Vice Admiral Premium Member

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    They're both similar to the Sonovox, which has been around since the late 1930s.

     
  20. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    So basically, you're asking what their bag was, right? :p

    If they got specific about it, I didn't catch it. A secret group of mercenaries helping a rival power...my impression is sort of a bush-league SPECTRE.

    It just looks nothing like the Missouri or any other actual ironclad vessel of the era, and somebody who knows their wooden sailing ships of the era could probably identify what type of ship that's actually supposed to be.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2019