The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Guess you had to be there.

    Kind of meh.

    Here's a good one I never heard before. Yep, sounds like the 50s.

    Here's a classic.

    And here's an even classicer classic.

    I'm with Friday. He basically nailed the perps without getting anybody hurt or killed.

    Sort of like the Old West. "We need a deputy. You're the deputy." :rommie:

    Exactly. That was my seventh birthday. :D
     
  2. MANT!

    MANT! Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    The Banana Splits are BACK....umm sorta


    Not the direction I was expecting..
     
  3. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50 Years Ago This Week


    And The Old Mixer is the size of a banana.

    (1:59)


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "The Boxer," Simon & Garfunkel (10 weeks)
    • "Goodbye," Mary Hopkin (9 weeks)
    • "Heather Honey," Tommy Roe (8 weeks)
    • "I Threw It All Away," Bob Dylan (5 weeks)
    • "In-a-Gadda-da-Vida," Iron Butterfly (17 weeks total; 5 weeks this run)
    • "It's Your Thing," The Isley Brothers (14 weeks)
    • "Pinball Wizard," The Who (11 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Feeling Alright," Joe Cocker

    (#69 US; re-released in 1972, reaching #33 US)

    "In the Year 2525 (Exordium & Terminus)," Zager & Evans

    (#1 US the weeks of July 12 through Aug. 16, 1969, which include Apollo 11 and part of the weekend of Woodstock; #1 AC; #1 UK)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • The Ed Sullivan Show, Season 21, episode 34, featuring the Everly Brothers and Phil Crosby

    _______

    Interesting...didn't know any of that about her.

    The crowd noise was provided specifically for the recording. It sounds to me like they're annoyingly overcompensating for not having an actual full crowd.

    Yeh.

    :whistle:

    And fun to add your own "-in'" constructions to!

    Now if you want an example of what I consider to be leftover '50s business, try this other recent 55th anniversary charter by the same group:

    "Alone," The Four Seasons

    (June 6, 1964; #28 US)

    I figured that must be the reason that this specific date inspired the joke.

    Well that's an odd choice. What's next, axe murderer Mr. Rogers and man-eating Big Bird? Think of what they could do with the lady from Romper Room--"I see Jimmy and Janey and Tommy..."
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
  4. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Looks like an episode of Supernatural. :rommie:

    You're practically part of a complete breakfast at this point.

    The mysterious appeal of Joe Cocker....

    I love this one.

    Annoying indeed.

    "Obsessin' and stalkin' and droolin' and...."

    Definitely sounds like the 50s.

    "We were working the morning watch out of Homicide when the call came in: A studio full of kids crushed to death by ten tons of ping pong balls. Our old friend Captain Kangaroo was back in town."
     
  5. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    The Avengers
    "The Curious Case of the Countless Clues"
    Originally aired April 3, 1968 (US); February 5, 1969 (UK)
    This TV even shows the "IN COLOR" blurb at the beginning! Kinda wished I'd watched the rest of the episodes via This instead of Cozi.

    Surreal teaser: A pair who seem like detectives seem to be investigating the scene of a murder...then when the apartment's resident comes home, they kill him and he falls neatly in the chalk outline. The bad guys are deliberately placing clues to implicate specific parties in their murders, making those parties targets for blackmail...payment for which being pieces in their art collections. The bumbling Holmes spoof, who's working for Scotland Yard, just seems to be there as the guy who takes all the planted clues at face value while thinking he's clever. He gets Steed involved to help him in questioning one of the murder suspects / blackmail victims without arousing suspicion. Steed is much more skeptical about the preponderance of clues being left at the crime scenes, and his recurring presence becomes a nuisance to the blackmailers.

    Tara's been injured in a skiing accident but is still in the entire episode, just not very mobile. Something sounds off about Thorson's voice, maybe she was sick or something. And somehow, everybody seems to know about Tara. First the sister of one of the victims and an old flame of Steed's comes calling for him at Tara's apartment. Then when the blackmailers decide to deal with Steed by framing him (which Steed catches onto right away), the intended murder victim is Tara, even though she hasn't been on the scene of any of the investigations. When Steed calls to warn her to lock up her apartment, its handicap-inaccessibility becomes a plot point (as does the fact that she doesn't have very good locks...the front door only seems to have a chain). She actually uses that pole in the middle of her apartment Batman-style to get downstairs quickly and try to secure the lower door, wherever that goes. The bad guys get in anyway, and start to devise their crime scene as she watches. When she questions why Steed would kill her, the brains of the duo (Anthony Bate) brushes it off as irrelevant--apparently "motive" doesn't factor into Scotland Yard investigations. She fights back to give Steed time to get there, and at one point throws Steed's bowler--with which Bate's character had attempted to impersonate Steed at her peephole--Oddjob-style.

    When Steed arrives, Tara has taken care of the duo. He uses the pole himself, but accidentally crushes his own bowler at the bottom. The coda has Tara performing surgery on Steed's bowler...accompanied by the tricorder sound effect!

    _______

    And working on a salad for lunch! :lol:

    And one of those recognizable classics that was worth digging a bit deeper for.

    It gets a bit grotesque in places, but is a compelling listen.

    Also, I read that the album version that I bought and posted has the studio-manufactured crowd noise more prominent in the mix than the single version did.

    The twist: framed by Mr. Green Jeans!

    I was just watching Rebel Without a Cause for the first time since high school. Edward Platt was working the night watch out of Juvenile Division...and given the setting, I half-expected Friday to make an appearance!
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
  6. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Nice. I haven't seen this one among the episodes that we've recorded in the past few months. I'll have to keep an eye peeled for it, since they'll be getting back around to the Tara episodes soon.

    It's actually odd that I like it, since it's both a condemnation of humanity and kind of religious. But it sounded like Science Fiction, and SF wasn't really common in the Top 40, and it had that feeling of what is now referred to as Deep Time, like the end of The Time Machine (the novel) or Clarke's "Exile of the Eons."

    We're on to something here.

    Or Max. :rommie:
     
  7. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    ...and during the Manson Family / Helter Skelter murders across August 8-9, 1969.

    I've always love this song as it predicts the increasing reliance on soulless reliance on technology to the point where humanity is reduced to something not human at all.

    Of note are the lyrics:

    "In the year 7510
    If God's a-coming, He oughta make it by then
    Maybe He'll look around Himself and say
    Guess it's time for the judgment day


    In the year 8510
    God is gonna shake His mighty head
    He'll either say I'm pleased where man has been
    Or tear it down, and start again."


    Its pretty clear that there would no joy in seeing what man had become, so this serves as a cautionary notice for a society that was (and is) becoming something other than what we were always meant to be. Its a message that used to be a component of many sci-fi books and few films of the general era, but that's largely gone now.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2019
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  8. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50th Anniversary Viewing

    The Ed Sullivan Show
    Season 21, episode 34
    Originally aired June 15, 1969
    As represented in The Best of the Ed Sullivan Show

    That transcription is straight from the closed captioning! Don does a brief spoken introduction in which he jokingly describes himself as the intelligent one, as they strum the intro to the first part of the medley, "Walk Right Back" (charted Feb. 6, 1961; #7 US, #1 UK). Don describes the next part, "Bye Bye Love," as the song "that got us out of the hubcap business, and off the streets, and onto The Ed Sullivan Show years and years ago" (charted May 20, 1957; #2 US, #1 Country, #5 R&B, #6 UK; #207 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time). The Everlys are sporting shaggier, post-Invasion hair at this point than they were in their hitmaking prime, but they're in fine, single-quality form performing these classics. This clip of the first song is edited differently, showing them going over to talk to Ed (not included in Best of) directly after it.

    Phil performs an up-tempo, granny-friendly swing number called "Let There Be Love". Phil doesn't sound much like his father, but he inherited the family hairline.

    Also in the original episode according to tv.com:
    _______

    50th Anniversary Album Spotlight

    Dusty in Memphis
    Dusty Springfield
    Released January 18, 1969
    Chart debut: March 15, 1969
    Chart peak: #99, April 12, 1969
    #89 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time

    "Just a Little Lovin'," originally released as the B-side of "Son of a Preacher Man," starts the album off sounding like a coffee commercial, but the Mann & Weil composition has a nice, smooth sound.


    Next is "So Much Love," the first of four Goffin & King songs on the album and the B-side-to-be of future single "In the Land of Make Believe". Wiki tells me that Ben E. King originally recorded it in 1966.

    Following that is the album's bona fide hit single, the classic "Son of a Preacher Man" (charted Nov. 30, 1968; #10 US; #9 UK; #240 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time):

    Fun fact that I just read: Hurley & Wilkins composed it with Aretha Franklin in mind...which I can totally hear. Also...

    "I Don't Want to Hear It Anymore," briefly of our prior acquaintance (charted Apr. 26, 1969; #105 US), was written by Randy Newman and originally recorded by Jerry Butler in 1964. It has a really nice sound, but its B-side, "The Windmills of Your Mind," was promoted over it when it won the Academy Award for Best Song.


    Goffin & King's "Don't Forget About Me" is another single that probably should have done better on the charts than it did (charted Mar. 1, 1969; #64 US):


    Side one of the album closes with the above song's B-side, "Breakfast in Bed," written by Hinton and Fritts. It also has a nice sound, but I can see why this one didn't do as well (charted Apr. 12, 1969; #91 US), though it's something that it charted as a B-side at all. Note the shout-out to Dusty's prior hit "You Don't Have to Say You Love Me".

    Side two opens with "Just One Smile," another Newman composition, and previously recorded by Gene Pitney in 1966. I didn't remember it, but Blood, Sweat & Tears also covered it on their 1968 album Child Is Father to the Man. Needless to say, their version is arranged quite differently.

    Next is one of the more striking songs of the album, "The Windmills of Your Mind" (B-side of "I Don't Want to Hear It Anymore"; charted May 3, 1969; #31 US; #3 AC), written by Bergman, Bergman, and Legrand, originally performed by Noel Harrison in the 1968 film The Thomas Crown Affair, and currently on the chart 50 years ago this week.

    I guess I'd qualify this as a successful cover of the song. I was initially put off by the difference from the original, but comparing the two versions, it makes up for what it loses by also gaining something.

    "In the Land of Make Believe" (charts Oct. 4, 1969; #113 US; #27 AC) is relatively unremarkable as Bacharach and David compositions go, but includes some relatively light use of Indian instrumentation.

    The remainder of the album is a twofer from Goffin and King, "No Easy Way Down" and "I Can't Make It Alone". Both are perfectly decent songs, but not particularly noteworthy to my ear compared to some of the album's other contents.

    Overall, this was a pleasant album, and its variety was a welcome change of pace after struggling to appreciate Odessey and Oracle better than I managed to. But this strikes me as another case of an album being perhaps oversold as a lost gem after the fact. I don't hear anything here that sounds all that remarkable for the day, such that it would belong on an exclusive list topped by Sgt. Pepper and Pet Sounds.

    Totally off-the-wall trivia point:

    Next up: Happy Trails, Quicksilver Messenger Service

    _______

    FWIW, more than one IMDb reviewer commented that it was a relatively un-surreal episode overall.

    An interesting contrast of opinions.

    Would Mr. Moose be an accessory?
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2019
  9. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    :rommie: Hard to imagine the Everly Bros in the hubcap business.

    I agree. Nothing else on the album has the power of "Son of a Preacher Man" (although the "Windmills" cover is nice enough).

    So the world owes Dusty Springfield for Led Zep-- interesting. Although they undoubtedly would have been signed regardless, even if somewhere else.

    Indeed. :rommie:

    Yes, but Bunny Rabbit was the man on the inside.
     
  10. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Yes! It does sound like a jingle! I can imagine a series of dissolves from one person taking in the aroma of their cup, while someone else pours another cup next to a conveniently placed can!

    Not exactly hitting it out of the park, but its a good song.

    Now that's a way to leave the decade (technically, the single was released in November of '68, but still...).

    This is...okay, but it sounds like parts of two songs competing against the other; the main chorus seems to answering to another type of song, making this a bit...disjointed.

    ..and takes me out of the song. Its as if the writers were trying to remind people that Dusty had "that favorite song you all know and love! Like this one, too!"

    This is more in her wheelhouse. Probably the second best track of the album.

    ...and after years of listening to the Harrison version on that film's soundtrack, any other recording simply does not match up, or capture its emotional energy as far as my ears are concerned.

    By 1969, the Indian adaptation was no longer that fresh, novel thing in rock/pop music anymore, which is why this always struck me as Dusty (or her writers / producers) trying to just drop her into a cash-in on Indian-influenced songs. The Bacharach/David patterns are there, but its just all over the place. Very unnatural.

    The album is usually considered an important point in her career, and while the biggest hit from this album is unforgettable, its not really supported by the rest of this LP. It reminds me of some 50s albums that were clearly about the one hit and the rest was just filler. Considering the talents behind the songs, one would be open to listening to the entire thing when first released, but contrary to some music journalists, its not the kind of record one can revisit as some great moment of 60s music. He best songs were behind her.[/quote]
     
  11. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I remember Just a Little Lovin. If memory serves, I think it actually was used in a coffee commercial back in the day. Only natural considering the song's lyrics. I'm not one who belives that a song used in a commercial necessarily demeans the song, composer, or performer. They're just pop songs and they're written to make money.

    To me, the only down side is that people who hear the song for the first time in a commercial, sometimes think that song was written to sell cars or insurance or whatever (and sometimes they are). But by then the money's already been made.

    Anyway, I'v always loved this song.
    Guess I'v heard this one too many times over the years. Can't listen to it anymore.
    Definitely. Would like to have heard what Aretha would have done with it.
    I remember Don't Want to Hear It Anymore, by Jerry Butler. I didn't know it was a Randy Neuman composition. Pretty conventional love song without any of his sardonic wit.
    For me, Windmills is just like Preacher Man; heard the song enough times to last me for the rest of my life.
    No Easy Way Down is my second favorite from this set. Has a Natural Woman vibe to it that is just perfect for Dusty's soft smokey voice.

    I can understand why Rolling Stone thought so highly of this album. Dusty sounds great. She seems to just wraps her voice around each song. I swear, her voice sounds to me like she is whispering the songs into my ear.[/QUOTE]
     
  12. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    This.

    Nah, he was a witness, but nobody could persuade him to talk.

    I think it works OK...changing the tempo in the chorus isn't an unusual technique.

    That would certainly explain the association if true.

    That's Carly Simon's "Anticipation" for me...can't hear it without thinking about ketchup.

    She got around to it.


    I'll have to keep that in mind in future listens.
     
  13. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Can't argue with that. :rommie:
     
  14. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Happy 77th, Sir Paul!
    :beer:
    Or 27th, Retro Paul who's still an MBE!
    :beer:
    Or 22nd, Retro Paul who isn't even an MBE yet!





     
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  15. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    :lol: Should have known she'd never let a song so perfect for her get away. I wonder if she wished she'd gotten a hold of Preacher Man before Dusty.
    :eek: He'll soon be 80. This remastered version of Yesterday sounds like Paul's lead has been double tracked. The Beatles used to do this quite a bit, but i don't recall the technique being used on Yesterday. Maybe it's just that I am able to hear the recording more clearly now because everything's been so cleaned up.
     
  16. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Retro gblews: :eek: He'll soon be 30.
     
  17. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Happy Birthday, Sir Paul. :beer:

    He's a year younger than my Mother, which is kind of mind boggling.
     
  18. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    The Wild Wild West

    "The Night of the Big Blackmail"
    Originally aired September 27, 1968
    Season 4 premiere
    Aw, they knew I'd be missing Dragnet so they put "the Big Blackmail" in the title.... And yes, the episode takes place in D.C., which is pretty "back East" for a Western.

    In the teaser Jim's eavesdropping out a window hanging from a line with a mechanical winch in the handle, whatever you call that gadget...which seems like more of a perfectly modern 1960s gadget than a retro one. He's sneaking around the German embassy and retrieving the faked footage while Grant is there for an official function hosted by the Baron (Harvey Korman...yes, that Harvey Korman), with undisguised Artie openly serving as the President's minder. Jim uses a mouse on rollers that goes up in a small explosion when it hits a wall to distract some guard dogs.

    Back at the Oval Office, Jim, Artie, and Grant view the film, which shows a very convincing double signing a secret defense pact with the foreign minister of an unnamed Asian nation, though the representative's name and Artie's comment about the nation being in the news a lot recently implies Japan. (FWIW, I didn't catch where they explicitly identified the Germans either.) The agents determine that they have to replace the film in such a way as to undermine its purpose while avoiding a diplomatic incident for having stolen the original. This involves Jim breaking into the office of a dead architect to retrieve the plans for the embassy's vault, though the embassy's security people somehow know that he's there and go after him. Jim tracks down an American who worked on the vault and was threatened into silence about it (Ron Rich), who's persuaded to tell Jim about a dumbwaiter system from the kitchen to the basement.

    Jim and Artie use a couple of cutouts mounted on a toy train and a phonograph to fool Germans spying outside the train while they infiltrate the embassy again...Artie disguised as a chef who flirts with a stern, middle-aged supervisor (Alice Nunn). In the basement they avoid the trap in the floor with the bladed rollers by hanging from the wall with the help of a temporary adhesive agent that will support their weight, an invention of Artie's that he'd demonstrated earlier on the train. Then they discover that the vault is locked by a large horizontal cylinder that exerts tons of pressure on the door. Jim commandeers the boiler room that includes the door's control mechanism. Once they've made the switch, they discover that the line they'd used to access the basement through a hole has fallen, so they improvise a launch platform that enables an explosive to propel Jim up through the hole (unconvincingly, obviously using backwards film).

    Back at the train, when a stray cat that Artie picked up in Denver messes with the cutouts, the Germans break in and discover the ruse, but trip a booby trap that knocks them out via colorful gas.

    The next day, Grant, Jim, and Artie attend the Baron's showing of the film, but the switched version has added footage in which the Grant double has been replaced by Artie in a deliberately (for once) unconvincing Grant disguise, engaing in a comedy routine. The guests assume that it was meant to be entertainment, but the German superior in attendance (Martin Kosleck) isn't amused with Hinterstoisser. Back at the train, Artie comes up with the idea of showing comedic footage like that in a hall for a fee, but Jim shoots it down.

    This one held my interest but nevertheless struck me as being a bit padded. The plot seemed too straightforward to fill an hour-long episode.


    "The Night of the Doomsday Formula"
    Originally aired October 4, 1968
    Denver (hopefully Artie dropped his feline stowaway back off): Jim's paying a nighttime visit to the Crane household just in time to attempt to intervene in the kidnapping of Lorna Crane (Melinda Plowman), but is knocked out by a cane with a weighted handle that looks like an iron fist. Prior to the abduction, Jim learned that Dr. Crane (E.J. André) had gone off with somebody claiming to be him. Crane has been working on an explosives formula that could revolutionize modern warfare, which the agents find hidden in Crane's lab. Back at the train they test the formula, and are impressed by the explosion, though we don't see its after-effect, and the train itself, 500 yards away, is unaffected.

    Going to town for information about how the doctor was nabbed, Artie impersonates the elder Crane and the bartender who's happy to recount details of the doctor's prevous visit (Vince Howard) doesn't recognize him as an imposter. Jim spots the cane and hitches a ride on the back of the wagon as 3rd Guard (Red West) and a colleague pick it up for the owner. Meanwhile, Artie looks into surviving officers of an Army regiment whose preferred drink Jim recognized from the war, and learns of a Major General Kroll (Kevin MCarthy) who owns a farm in Denver and has been having lots of foreign guests. Artie visits the club that Kroll belongs to disguised as a sheikh and approaches him to bid on the new explosive that he believes Kroll has acquired. Kroll invites him to come to the farm where they can discuss the matter in more detail.

    At the farm, Jim learns that Crane is dying and that his daughter is being held as persuasion. Jim tries to spring the doctor, but Crane won't leave until he knows his daughter is safe. The visiting Fake Sheikh takes a respite in his room and sings a comically awful (and no doubt offensive by modern standards) Middle Eastern-flavored song while playing a mandolin, so that he can use a music box to make Kroll think that he's still in his room while he makes a rendezvous with Jim. Artie arranges a distraction by planting some fireworks in Kroll's study while Jim locates and frees Lorna with the help of his piton pistol. Dr. Crane dramatically passes on just as he learns that she's safe.

    Kroll corners Jim in his armory with remote-triggered Gatling guns and gives a brief Bond villain monologue about how he's developing more modern weapons to sell to the highest bidder, but Jim takes him out with a mini-grendade, then sets the place to blow sky high.

    The incidental music is suddenly, distractingly more hip and modern in this episode.

    _______
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2019
  19. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    :lol: I can almost remember uttering those very words. When they first hit in 1964 George was 22, Paul 23, and Ringo and John 24. I had no idea of how young that was back then.
     
  20. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    They were working the night watch out of Presidential Babysitting.

    They should have called it "Night of the Deep Fakes."

    We're getting into Mission: Impossible territory here.

    Yeah, nobody would ever waste their time with that. :rommie:

    Hopefully that's all he did with him. :rommie:

    Definitely some mind control at work here.