News SpaceX heavy-lift vehicles: Launch Thread

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by XCV330, Jan 24, 2018.

  1. XCV330

    XCV330 A Being of Pure Caffeine Premium Member

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    So it's on pad at LC-39a, not sure if its vertical this morning yet, or not, but we may see a static fire test later today. With luck that Tesla Roadster is going to mars in a couple of weeks. This will be the most rocket engines fired at the same time, if I am correct, since the N-1 rocket tests in the early 1970's.
     
  2. Asbo Zaprudder

    Asbo Zaprudder Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Let's hope it fares better than those four N-1 launches.
     
  3. XCV330

    XCV330 A Being of Pure Caffeine Premium Member

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    next stop, Mars (after the launch of course)
     
  4. YellowSubmarine

    YellowSubmarine Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I'm not sure the debris from the pad 39A service structure will reach Mars even if a rocket that big blows up. :p
     
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  5. Asbo Zaprudder

    Asbo Zaprudder Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Whatever became of plug nozzle engines?
     
  6. YellowSubmarine

    YellowSubmarine Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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  7. Asbo Zaprudder

    Asbo Zaprudder Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Fingers crossed.
     
  8. YellowSubmarine

    YellowSubmarine Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Woah, it's today, in less than 12 hours. Not sure if I'll watch this live, because it's going to blow and I'm not ready for that kind of suspense.

    Elon gives it 67% chance of success, which I find unrealistically low. The worry is the interaction of the three F9 cores and 27 Merlin engines, which has never been tested in flight (kind of obvious, since that's the only thing that's new). But fixing that issue has been why they have been delaying the Heavy until now. I don't think they would fly if they weren't confident that had fixed any known troubles with that – if they haven't, no amount of good telemetry from a test flight will solve them for the ArabSat 6A launch, which is ‘early’ this year.

    So I presume the 33% chance of failure Elon gives is about unknowns they didn't foresee in their simulations, and other shortcomings of those simulations or the static fire as a source of data. But that means he doesn't know the actual chance, and if it is 33% and we don't blow, they may not even notice the issue until a future rocket blows, which doesn't seem reasonable.

    And I don't think they would be risking damage to the pad if the chances were really this low.

    Doesn't the worry here also apply to their future Mars rocket, which has even more engines that are way bigger? I guess they might be willing to blow up some Heavy rockets to get the BFR right, but that sounds far-fetched.

    I think the flight will be successful, but I still won't watch. Call me when SpaceX are actually confident they can fly this thing. :ouch:
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2018
  9. XCV330

    XCV330 A Being of Pure Caffeine Premium Member

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    seeing the ballet the returned boosters are going to have to perform to get back to the lz (two on the ground, one on the barge) is going to be interesting.
     
  10. feek61

    feek61 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    They do it with one booster pretty convincingly so 3 should be doable.
     
  11. XCV330

    XCV330 A Being of Pure Caffeine Premium Member

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    More importantly, it will look cool.
     
  12. XCV330

    XCV330 A Being of Pure Caffeine Premium Member

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    pushed back to 3:05pm eastern
     
  13. Romulan_spy

    Romulan_spy Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    T-11 Looking good!
     
  14. YellowSubmarine

    YellowSubmarine Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    No kaboom. Falcon Heavy part of the mission a success. Wowwww.
     
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  15. Romulan_spy

    Romulan_spy Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Both boosters landed vertically at the same time! WOW!!

    Congratulations SpaceX!

    [​IMG]
     
  16. YellowSubmarine

    YellowSubmarine Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    That was the most extraordinary thing I've ever watched. Spectacular.

    The simul-landing was absolutely beautiful. What's with the centre core cover-up though? :p

    Oh, and that's absolutely hilarious:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    I hope the second stage comes back online tomorrow after the coasting, and the Roadster heads towards TMI. :D
     
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  17. XCV330

    XCV330 A Being of Pure Caffeine Premium Member

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    Amazing!
     
  18. pl1ngpl0ng

    pl1ngpl0ng Captain Captain

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    Wow that double landing made my jaw drop....
     
  19. YellowSubmarine

    YellowSubmarine Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    A good graphic of the insanity we witnessed.

    With some caveats:
    - Three-engine landing of the centre core failed.
    - Graphic omits the 5 hour coasting that the second stage is doing ATM* as a demonstration for the USAF (original Elon comment was about a 6 hour coasting before restart).
    - Fairing recovery still pending.
    - The seriously humourous ending is not in the picture.

    * Elon: “Upper stage restart nominal, apogee raised to 7000 km. Will spend 5 hours getting zapped in Van Allen belts & then attempt final burn for Mars.”

    ETA: Live stream from the Tesla
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2018
  20. Marc

    Marc Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Never quite seen the point of landing the boosters vertically. Are they too big/awkward/not structurally sound when empty to parachute back to earth like NASA did with the Shuttle SRBs. Parachutes aren't light but surely lighter than the fuel and landing struts (and less chance for boom if something goes wrong).