Poll "Small Universe Syndrome" - Yay Or Nay?

Discussion in 'Science Fiction & Fantasy' started by wayoung, Sep 9, 2021.

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Do you enjoy fiction that has Small Universe Syndrome?

  1. Yes! I love when my favourite characters all end up connected!

    27 vote(s)
    67.5%
  2. No, it breaks my suspension of disbelief

    13 vote(s)
    32.5%
  1. fireproof78

    fireproof78 Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Well, in games, as you say, it is expected. That's part of the base concept. You're the protagonist, the mover of the story. It's part of what interests me in the story. In a TV universe or film that is a little bit different. It can work on the same rules, but there is also a sense of a living, breathing, world. Well, if you create this large world, but then constantly have people knowing everyone else it strains belief to a degree.

    It can be very effective in a game, but distracting in a film series.
     
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  2. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Again, depends on the game, and I think there are some games that create a great backstory that then feels natural in meeting up with certain characters. But yeah, overall, I think I agree.
     
  3. fireproof78

    fireproof78 Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    But, again, a game is not a movie. A game is making the player the main character. Films can do this, with the avatar style everyman stereotype, but that can't last long.
     
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  4. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Agreed, which is why it's much easier to accept it via a game versus when it happens in a movie. In a movie, as you point out, it would become extremely tiring if the character ended up knowing every so and so. It would actually be an interesting study. In a game, it can add to the worldbuilding, in a movie, not always the case.
     
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  5. eschaton

    eschaton Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Generally speaking, CRPG players hate things like timed quests which allow sections of the story to move forward even if you aren't present. Most game series that implemented them ended up removing them in sequels.

    Obviously open-world games are a different matter, but they tend not to be focused on story, and attract a different kind of player.
     
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  6. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Interesting, I don't think I've ever come across that. Theoretically, I suppose it should give the world some depth, but I could see how people wouldn't like it in that they'd feel like they're missing out on something if they're not present. I think the only reference to something of a timed nature was with the first Fallout.
     
  7. fireproof78

    fireproof78 Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Basically, yes. I mean, the other side is that in a game a lot of time is put in to appealing to a large variety of players, some of whom will invest in that lore, and others who will just engage because of the combat or story. In a film, it comes across as well only the main character is important and the only way things could happen. If that makes sense.
    I believe Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask was also timed. And annoying.
     
  8. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Come to think of it, I think I've come across time-based questing in most recent version of Prey, where you have a certain amount of time to find needed medical supplies and return to the person who needs them, and if you don't return to them in time, the quest fails. It's a minor quest, but I found it rather interesting in that it's entirely in the player's freedom.
     
  9. fireproof78

    fireproof78 Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Honestly, I do find such quests very interesting, if only because they appeal to that more real world sensibility. I think Fallout has played with that a little in recent games, but I wouldn't mind at least some options within that. Possibly a "Survival" type mode, similar to that Prey quest, where if you don't get the supplies to a wounded NPC in time they die. Probably not for everyone, but still would be interesting mechanic.
     
  10. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah, they do in certain cases make their world feel more alive. I'm currently playing through Tyranny, and that game has a great worldbuilding method where the choices you make really do affect the outcomes in the world, and at the same time, it has it built-into the story that you're someone with big connections rising to the top.