On Bedford Day, Remembering the Lost Cryonauts

"Mummy" implies no scientific possibility of reanimation, does it not?
it is a broad term of any preserved body that simply doesn't decay (IMO)

since you asked, this is my opinion on the points you made:
1) may be in some cases, may not be in others
2) right
3) right
4) a bit, and I don't
5) could be
6) sure, yes, not if they don't have to, maybe
7) one could say the still living have priority over the no longer living
8) very deep hibernation that keeps the heart beating slowly (like the current procedures cooling the heart during surgery) will be safer than keeping them dead and reviving them again
 
it is a broad term of any preserved body that simply doesn't decay (IMO)
8) very deep hibernation that keeps the heart beating slowly (like the current procedures cooling the heart during surgery) will be safer than keeping them dead and reviving them again
Hibernation (torpor) could be used for interplanetary travel, but cryostasis can be perfected eventually and would be much better for interstellar and intergalactic travel. Hibernation could still be used if aging was cured, but keeping a heart beating—no matter how slowly—for hundreds, thousands, or millions of years would be much less efficient and far more prone to failure than full suspended animation once perfected. (I think we'll become postbiological long before becoming intergalactic, though.)
 
A step forward in the technology
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2024-05-technique-brain-tissue.amp

And now we have head transplants?
https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2024/05/new-startup-brainbridge-wants-to-perform-head-transplants.html

If we can make it to the next decade
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/ar-AA1iyzDs
 
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