New Description for Seize the Fire

Discussion in 'Trek Literature' started by JD, Aug 30, 2010.

  1. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Simon & Schuster just put up a new, more detailed description for the Titan Typhon Pact book, Seize the Fire.
     
  2. Mysterion

    Mysterion Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Memo to Gorn Hegemony: Don't put all your eggs in one basket.

    :)
     
  3. TerraUnam

    TerraUnam Commander Red Shirt

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    Segue into how Tuvok was around during the events of Star Trek II?
     
  4. ryan123450

    ryan123450 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    That's what you'd think, but Tuvok really shouldn't be old enough to remember much about that time. Hmmm...now that I think about it, maybe he could be, but he would have probably been a teenager around then.

    On the other hand, Tuvok's age has always been variously portrayed, so anything's probably possible.
     
  5. TerraUnam

    TerraUnam Commander Red Shirt

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    He was on the Excelsior a few years later during the time of Star Trek VI, so it's not impossible, continuity-wise.
     
  6. Turtletrekker

    Turtletrekker Admiral Admiral

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    According to Memory Alpha, Tuvok was born in 2264 and ST2 took place in 2285.
     
  7. ryan123450

    ryan123450 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    hmmm. I guess he's a few year older than I was thinking.
     
  8. Thrawn

    Thrawn Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    See? Titan's still about long-distance exploration of strange alien stuff, even in the Typhon Pact miniseries. Thought so.
     
  9. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    I did too. I'm pretty sure we'd even been told as much by Michael Martin or one of the editors, in the past.
     
  10. kkozoriz1

    kkozoriz1 Fleet Captain

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    Hanging around the Gorn, a species that we met in TOS doesn't seem to be "long distance exploration". Get them way out there, away from the trappings of TOS, TNG, DS9 & VOY. Out on the frontier. One ship, exploring.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2010
  11. Thrawn

    Thrawn Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    And why aren't the Gorn allowed to be exploring too?
     
  12. kkozoriz1

    kkozoriz1 Fleet Captain

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    Because it would be like Magellan just happening to bump into another European explorer in the Pacific except on a much, much larger scale.
     
  13. Sci

    Sci Admiral Admiral

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    Who cares? It'll make for a good story. The Federation doesn't usually run into other explorers from their neighborhood; after 40 years and hundreds of stories, one where they do isn't that bad.
     
  14. Defcon

    Defcon Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Not sure if it's worth a separate thread, so I post it here, since this thread is about news from S&S:

    It seems like the next New Frontier novel Blind Man's Bluff has been pushed back again. Both S&S and Amazon have an April release date listed now.
     
  15. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Wasn't it changed once before already?
     
  16. captcalhoun

    captcalhoun Admiral Admiral

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    ^still haven't got Treason yet...
     
  17. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Not really. Read the description again. Both Titan and the Gorn explorers are looking for the same thing. Thus it stands to reason that they'd follow the same leads and end up in the same places.
     
  18. kkozoriz1

    kkozoriz1 Fleet Captain

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    Yes, but space is big. Really big. Really, really big. Also, I want to see Titan exploring, not running errands. If they do find what they are looking for it stands to reason that they'd be returning what they found to the Federation. Even if it's information that they can send back to Starfleet they're still tied into the whole big story. I want them to be way past the frontier exploring. Be Magellan out in the Pacific, not bopping around the Mediterranean.

    It's a continuation of the recovery from Destiny. More reminders of the death and destruction.To me, that's a problem with the consolidated timeline. It's like a spin off from a big comic book event. It may not be a part of the main story but it's got the big EVENT banner splashed across the top of the cover.

    From the back cover of Synthesis - "The Starship Titan continues on her outward voyage of discovery. Ranging farther and farther from Federation space, Captain William Riker and the crew look forward to living Starfleet’s mission: seeking out new life, discovering new civilizations."

    This necessity to tie every TNG era series into the "Next Big Crossover" is getting old already. Let each series find it's own way, it's own voice without having to serve the "BIG PLOT".
     
  19. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Yes, but that's misleading, because it's mostly really, really empty. The stuff that people would want is concentrated in much smaller portions of space, and thus the likelihood that different groups looking for the same sorts of thing would run across each other is commensurately greater.

    Besides, how many Trek episodes have involved two civilizations happening to end up in the same place without planning it? How about "Friday's Child" or "The Apple?" The Enterprise just happens to show up at a planet at the same time the Klingons are also there. It's just a fact of life that coincidental meetings happen disproportionately often in fiction, because if they didn't happen, there'd be no story to tell. Just call it a selection bias. Fiction selects for unusual occurrences. The cases where nothing unusual happens just don't get depicted. So naturally the probability distribution's gonna be skewed.



    Titan's done plenty of exploring in the past two books, and it will do more after this book. This is a special event. It's one book. What's so horrible about mixing up the format from time to time?

    And yes, this may be an "errand," but it's an errand that involves searching for something unknown. Also known as, oh, what's the word... exploring. Exploration doesn't just mean wandering around aimlessly. Exploration is something that's done for a purpose, specifically the purpose of finding things that are useful for your civilization to know about or possess. Which can be new scientific insights, or new works of literature or art, or exotic foods, or expanded astropolitical knowledge, or alliances with alien powers, or useful resources or technologies.

    The great explorers of the past have always been motivated by the desire to bring benefits back home. Magellan didn't circumnavigate the globe just to say he could; he was charged with the mission of finding a new commercial route to the East Indies so that Spain could compete in the spice trade with Portugal. There's no fundamental dichotomy between the marvels of exploration and the pragmatic pursuit of material gain.


    It's rather cynical to look at the process of recovery and regrowth and be reminded only of the destruction that's being recovered from. Tragedy is always part of life, but we recover from it. I just lost my father a few weeks ago. That tragedy is going to be part of my life from now on, and there are always going to be things that remind me of it, and there are always going to be times when I have to talk about it or deal with its aftereffects. But that doesn't mean I'm going to be wallowing in misery for the rest of my life. I had a lot of support from family and others who helped me through it, and I'm moving forward from it, living my life. I've actually renewed ties with family members I'd grown too isolated from, and I'm motivated now to make some other positive changes in my life. My father's death is part of the background of my life now, and it will always hurt, but that doesn't mean its effects on my future have to be negative.

    You can't pretend that tragedy doesn't exist, but you shouldn't obsess on a tragedy that's over with. Life goes on. That doesn't mean you never mention the tragedy again; it means you acknowledge it and don't let it overcome you.

    So no, this is not just a continuation of the death and destruction. This is the next thing, a different story, a story of rebuilding and renewal. The destruction is just the backstory. Star Trek literature is moving on, accepting the past but moving toward the future. If you're unable to see beyond the devastation of Destiny, that's your issue, not the books' issue.


    This is a business. Destiny sold well, and the publisher wanted another crossover series. So blame the audience.
     
  20. Thrawn

    Thrawn Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    kkozoriz - would it have been as objectionable if Titan had encountered the Gorn randomly, and the book hadn't been called Typhon Pact?