Moving Slow at Warp Speed

Discussion in 'Trek Tech' started by Spock Riding, Jan 11, 2019.

  1. Spock Riding

    Spock Riding Commodore Premium Member

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    If the thickest part of the star map above is a total of 2000 lys, and can be a little thinner. Our sun is very near the center line of the galactic disk in the Orion arm. If you go 900 lys in any direction normal to the axis of the arm, you are at the edge of the galaxy or in the gap between arms. The void must be one the gaps to the next arm either Perseus going away from the galaxy center or Carina going into the galaxy center. Either void looks like ~1000 lys wide. I think who wrote the story did a little technical research with real distances; a good job. :techman:
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2019
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  2. Brain Melter

    Brain Melter Admiral Rear Admiral

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    My take on this is that warp 1 is the speed of light, warp 10 is infinity, therefore in between, we have a curve with 10 as a vertical asymptote.
     
  3. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Infinity is not a number
     
  4. Brain Melter

    Brain Melter Admiral Rear Admiral

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    You obviously don't know what a vertical asymptote is.
     
  5. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    How would a vertical asymptote be at all useful or practical for navigation purposes though?
     
  6. Brain Melter

    Brain Melter Admiral Rear Admiral

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    It's a mathematical concept. Maths are not only useful, but they are also indispensable to determine pretty much everything and that includes navigation.
     
  7. BK613

    BK613 Commodore Commodore

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    There is a misconception about the "gaps" between arms being stated here. Infrared images of other spiral galaxies have shown that stellar population "between arms" is only slightly less dense than in the arms, with the difference being the bright, massive, short-lived stars which form and die in the arms. So we see the arm structure because the arms are brighter, not because they are more dense. (Crude analogy: There are more porch lights than street lights but from the air you will see the street layout because street lights are brighter. ) Here's a link describing the arms in better detail.
     
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  8. Spock Riding

    Spock Riding Commodore Premium Member

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    I'm not buying. There's massively less stars in the voids between arms.
     
  9. Timo

    Timo Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    I'd actually vote for the latter, as Kirk waits for Spock's analysis of the path ahead before daring to issue the order to proceed at all...

    Presumably Spock is expected to keep on sitting in the crow's nest and calling the rocks and shoals until they are through this strange and threatening void, and then Sulu can resume normal speed, whatever that is. Spock does keep on giving reports, carefully stating when they move to the next quadrant of utter emptiness, at which point Kirk again voices his concern for whatever might lie there. This despite there apparently being Starfleet records of this area, that is, those records that oddly fail to mention Planet Gothos.

    Lucky that our heroes can notify the Discovery and arrange for backup in this extremely dangerous situation. Unlucky for them that she's apparently otherwise engaged.

    Timo Saloniemi
     
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  10. Spock Riding

    Spock Riding Commodore Premium Member

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    Ya, what is the Discovery up to at this time period being only ten years in the future? :guffaw:
     
  11. Ithekro

    Ithekro Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Maybe she's lost (as one of the shorts seems to suggest). Maybe she's in for a refit and no longer has the Spore Drive (thus making her less available for jump rescues). Maybe the ship we saw briefly in Star Trek III in Spacedock was USS Discovery after a refit of some kind.
     
  12. Brain Melter

    Brain Melter Admiral Rear Admiral

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    In Asimov's novels, it would take hours to determine where the ship was (after a jump of several light years through hyperspace) by selecting stars at random and trying to determine which they were by comparing their spectrum with a listing of known stars. With billions of stars to choose from it's even amazing that they managed to do that in less than a lifetime!
     
  13. Brain Melter

    Brain Melter Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Maybe she's been decommissioned. Look at what happened to Archer's Enterprise after the same amount of time.
     
  14. Ithekro

    Ithekro Vice Admiral Admiral

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    If the Spore Drive becomes unusable, she's be decommissioned, or converted to have a more practical saucer and better warp drives.
     
  15. BK613

    BK613 Commodore Commodore

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  16. Spock Riding

    Spock Riding Commodore Premium Member

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    What? No more flippy whippy do's? :scream: Nah, you can't remove that special effect. It's what makes Discovery ... well, special.:p
     
  17. Spock Riding

    Spock Riding Commodore Premium Member

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    I started reading the research, and I have a lot more to go. I stand corrected. Truly, thank you for the research references, BK. :techman: SF writers (and me) in the 60's probably thought like I did since most of the Milky Way observations are done with satellites after the 60's.
    Back to Star Trek. Some of the research says inside the spiral arms is more dangerous with active, younger and bigger stars with more dust and rocky matter. In between the arms with less dust density and few percent less stars, you'd still think you can go faster. (Less matter, bigger spacing between stars, more zero point energy, thinner subspace resistance, more favorable Cochrane factor, more warp field technobabble...) :vulcan:
    More babble: The stars in between the arms may be older, with older civilizations if they survive and more advanced super aliens like Trelane's race, Charlie X's adoptive parents and Sargon's planet. These encounters I'd put near the edge of the "arm" and/or near the galactic edge. The "void" in Squire was maybe just a void. :p
     
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  18. BK613

    BK613 Commodore Commodore

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    I agree, in the 1960s, people were just beginning to challenge the thought that the spiral arms were all there was. And believe me, i am sympathetic to upended ideas. Bradbury's rains of Venus gave way to a real sulfuric hell, the rocky moons of the gas giants became icy worlds, and a single spiral arm between Trantor and Terminus is not where a Galactic Empire wants to be. :)
     
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  19. uniderth

    uniderth Commodore Commodore

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    Well, yes, they can put their discovery on subspace radio, but who knows which ship would respond.
     
  20. Brain Melter

    Brain Melter Admiral Rear Admiral

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    What's funny in the ST Universe is that everything goes at warp speed!!! I mean when a star explodes like in Generations, it should take minutes before you could see the explosion from a habitable planet... NOT SECONDS. For example, If someone sends a faster than light rocket toward the sun and instantaneously extinguishes it. It would still take more than 8 minutes to see the extinction on Earth. Same thing about gravity, assuming the extinction of a star changes radically its mass (which is weird, to say the least) that change of mass would take years to propagate toward a ribbon passing by light years away, not IMMEDIATELY!!!
     
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