It's official: FTL is impossible

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Deckerd, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. Tan Ru

    Tan Ru Captain Captain

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  2. Deckerd

    Deckerd Fleet Arse Premium Member

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    It's all about time travel. Presumably an object sent through a wormhole is sent far into the future relative to the time of the start point. Therefore if it came back it would again be sent far into the future, so the original start point would be far back in the past.
     
  3. Ronald Held

    Ronald Held Vice Admiral Admiral

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    It is impossible for those who says so, for they will never achieve it. IMO that experiment does not prove it cannot be done.
     
  4. Mysterion

    Mysterion Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Huh?

    Opinions have no bearing on data from an experiment. the data is what it is. What are the flaws in the experiment that lead you to the conclusion you state?
     
  5. Dac

    Dac Commodore Commodore

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    Personally I don't give a rats ass about time travel - that's always been too confusing. As long as some day we humans are visiting other worlds* on a regular basis I'll be happy.

    *Other worlds that are not in this solar system.
     
  6. Lindley

    Lindley Moderator with a Soul Premium Member

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    I have to agree with him that the path from the experimental result to the over-arching conclusion is not clear at all.
     
  7. Mr Silver

    Mr Silver Commodore Newbie

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    I think everyone is getting ahead of themselves, this is one study that has failed to confirm the existence of FTL velocities. As Deckerd and some other have pointed out, the BBC does like to "sensationalise" such things and its been wrong before.

    Besides the very concept of FTL travel is impossible in any known sense anyway. First of all we have no practical means of propulsion, how can such speeds be attained if there is no method of propulsion? Sub-atomic particles cannot travel past a certain point, which has already been determined and there is no way to test these theories on objects that aren't bound by biochemical makeup and the elements as of yet.
     
  8. Robert Maxwell

    Robert Maxwell memelord Premium Member

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    I think everyone already knew that you can't exceed c using conventional (thrust-based) propulsion methods, though this perhaps provides more concrete confirmation of it.
     
  9. Asbo Zaprudder

    Asbo Zaprudder Admiral Admiral

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    Some sort of enhanced version of the Scharnhorst effect perhaps.
     
  10. Wereghost

    Wereghost Part-time poltergeist Rear Admiral

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    So Einstein's theories are validated yet again and the universe's speed limit remains intact. This is in no way surprising, nor even disappointing really.
     
  11. Mr Silver

    Mr Silver Commodore Newbie

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    That would be Smith's theory of relativity...
     
  12. FPAlpha

    FPAlpha Vice Admiral Premium Member

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    If it is indeed possible to travel to other systems or even galaxies in a reasonable amount of time it will be discovered sooner or later (if humanity doesn't destroy itself by then) because there's just so much we don't know and discover each day.

    Technologies we thought impossible are reality today and who knows what will be possible in 100 years? If you go back 200 years or more and tell people about planes at best they'll ignore you as a weird guy with funny ideas or you'll be put in an asylum for your own safety.

    Maybe it will be an accidental discovery like penicillin when a bright mind wakes up one day and goes "Hey.. this is an interesting idea" or it will be a long process of scientific study.

    And coincidentally i'm hearing the title music of "The Big Bang Theory" right now on TV :lol::lol:
     
  13. Wereghost

    Wereghost Part-time poltergeist Rear Admiral

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    [yt]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrsN8iTwFiw[/yt]
     
  14. YellowSubmarine

    YellowSubmarine Vice Admiral Admiral

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    There's one question I'd be more thrilled to find an answer to before looking for ways to travel faster than c: What happens when we throw causality down the drain?
     
  15. Mr. B

    Mr. B Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Sooner or later, any scientist who says "that's impossible" looks like an idiot.
     
  16. Bill Morris

    Bill Morris Commodore Commodore

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    With the syrup-eating worm, he would be subject to Einstein's rules only if he tried to push through the barrier upon those rules were based. Instead he ate the barrier a little at a time, and the barrier closed in behind him, pushing him forward. That was his means of propulsion. So he was not at all subject to time dilation or the notion of going back in time if he exceeded the nomal limit. And the worm's normal means of propulsion was not needed and not used at all until he reached his destination. The only "wormhole" involved here was the temporary vacuum he created in front of him by taking in a mouthful of the barrier.

    Extrapolating that to spacecraft, a device that eats through the fabric of space serves as warp drive, impulse drive, and intertial dampers. allowing point-to-point travel at any desired speed with no g-force, no relativistic time effects, and no need for fuel--totally subversive.
     
  17. MANT!

    MANT! Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Might I suggest Clarke's 3 laws...

    Nerds don't weep..they just bypass the rules...
     
  18. PurpleBuddha

    PurpleBuddha Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    If some form of FTL is possible, we need all the theories that come before saying it is not. The greatest source of knowledge science gives comes from the rotting remains of the numerous falsified theories throughout history. In falsifying theories we learn so much. We discover new directions to take and we make unsuspected discoveries. We not only learn which ideas were wrong, but gain new ones in the process. While on the one hand I believe it to be completely foolish to declare something like this as impossible, on the other it gives science a very concrete direction to proceed one day in discovering the way to achieve FTL should such a feat be possible.
     
  19. Bill Morris

    Bill Morris Commodore Commodore

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    Right, but it does often make life miserable for people who actually do the work. A scientist with a new idea can go through decades of ridicule, denied grants, expulsion from teaching (or voluntary resignation rather than teach what one believes is wrong), divorce, heart attacks, etc.

    And about new discoveries, some math problems were long considered impossible to solve. At the bottom of this Wikipedia page is a list of problems that were eventually and unexpectedly solved, and these are only fairly recent examples. And that's with "an exact science."

    Unsolved math problems recently solved:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unsolved_problems_in_mathematics
     
  20. YellowSubmarine

    YellowSubmarine Vice Admiral Admiral

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    You know, even if some form of FTL is possible, the results that state that it is impossible might still be true? In fact they most likely will be, unless everything that we know is wrong.