Is A Planet's Resonance Able to Determine If Life is Present?

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Dryson, Jun 13, 2021.

  1. Dryson

    Dryson Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Solar Sonic Resonance
    Perhaps when sound is played at certain frequencies, the waves create turbulence in water that causes life to adjust by increasing the need for energy consumption, that then adds more oxygen to muscles that allow muscles to grow and get stronger.
    Planets with water on them, might not need a Moon after all, but instead waves of sound created by possible interactions between the Sun and minerals of planet could create sonic resonance. Sonic Resonance or vibrations. Different vibrations that stimulate life to grow.
    If a planet 'vibrates' at a frequency within the same range that Earth vibrates and is also located within Goldilocks Zone, then life could very well be present on the planet's surface. The reason why is. If a planet vibrates within a certain range frequency of Earth, the Exo-Planet would have a similar volume of water on it compared to Earth. This would be due to the atoms from the Sun causing vibrations within the soil as a result of the sun's atoms interacting with other atoms at near the speed of light along with light photons.
    For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Therefore an atom of Iron traveling at a velocity of n that collides with a mineral type b will create a resonance factor of c. Other factors to consider is the rate of velocity that the planet is spinning along with the angle at which the atom or light photon collides with the element on the planet.

    How would a probe able to detect a planets solar/sonic resonance from a distance of 20 light years?

    Does solar/sonic resonance effect the dip in the light curve of a planet as the planet transits across it's sun?
     
  2. Finn

    Finn Bad Batch of TrekBBS Premium Member

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  3. BillJ

    BillJ Canon Warrior Premium Member

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  4. Crazyewok

    Crazyewok Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Ehhhhh?
    :ack:
     
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  5. Santaman

    Santaman Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I think he forgot that there's no sound in space.. no one hears you scream.. :evil:
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2021
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  6. Dryson

    Dryson Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Sounds does exist in space, through Electromagnetic Vibration


    From an original CD: JUPITER NASA-VOYAGER SPACE SOUNDS (1990) BRAIN/MIND Research Fascinating recording of Jupiter sounds (electromagnetic "voices") by NASA-Voyager. The complex interactions of charged electromagnetic particles from the solar wind , planetary magnetosphere etc. create vibration "soundscapes". It sounds very interesting, even scary. Jupiter is mostly composed of hydrogen and helium.
    Therefore, since helium and hydrogen atoms / gas make up the largest volume of the Universe, a planet similar to Earth, would resonant differently behind the background of helium and hydrogen atoms that are farther away from the Sun that the habitable planet is orbiting.
    It's similar to looking for a transiting planet, a small single pixel of static, in the background of a t.v. screen full of static.
    A planet causes a dip in the light curve as it transits across a Sun. Based on EM Vibration, the same planet should also produce a noticeable rise in the amount of EM vibration (highly excited helium and hydrogen) during the same transit across the planet's parent star.
    Each planet would have its own helium/hydrogen EM vibration pattern that is hidden in a single pixel of light that would need to have the color regions of the single pixel sharpened to around 10,000%, to determine the actual amount of hydrogen and helium vibration taking place.
    Just because a pixel is red or yellow, doesn't mean the entire pixel is red or yellow. There are in fact, percentage values to each color in a pixel that can paint a very accurate picture of what is being viewed.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2021
  7. StarCruiser

    StarCruiser Commodore Commodore

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  8. Non Sync

    Non Sync Commodore Commodore

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    Images taken by the various spacecraft and other probes are not taken with color cameras. They use high resolution panachrome cameras that take multiple images with different filters and then the images are combined and manipulated for the end result that we see.
     
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  9. Finn

    Finn Bad Batch of TrekBBS Premium Member

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    You don’t know what you are talking about
     
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  10. Asbo Zaprudder

    Asbo Zaprudder Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Resonance (of what exactly?) isn't a biosignature with which I am familiar. A biosignature often quoted is the detection of a disequilibrium in the abundances of gas species such as the co-existence of oxygen and methane (gases that usually react with each other) in the atmospheres of planets of G and K-type stars. This is probably not a definitive indicator of (Earth-like) life as potential abiotic mechanisms for these gases being produced also exist. The relatively high proportion of reducing molecules such as CO and H2 in Mars' atmosphere has been posited as evidence for a negative biosignature (antibiosignature).

    Biosignature - Wikipedia
     
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  11. 'Q'

    'Q' Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Keep this dude around to defeat Skynet. It's our only hope for future AI to commit suicide.
     
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  12. Dryson

    Dryson Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Exactly.

    An abundance or lack of hydrogen and helium along with other chemical compounds required for water and life in a planet does change the spectrum of color that a planet creates as it transits across a Sun.

    If light from a star doesn't effect a planets color when seen from space, then why can I visually identify the color of a star with my name eye but when I look through a telescope, the star is always a mix of red, yellow, blue or green colors unless I use a filter


    Daft Punk -Harder, Better, Faster. Discovery
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2021
  13. 'Q'

    'Q' Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Chromatic aberation. Get a better telescope.
     
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  14. Dryson

    Dryson Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Bud, all telescopes have Chromatic Aberation.

    Besides, I have a $1,500 Star Max with numerous eyepiece, Barlows and filters.

    What class of telescope do you have?

    In optics, chromatic aberration, also called chromatic distortion and spherochromatism, is a failure of a lens to focus all colors to the same point. It is caused by dispersion: the refractive index of the lens elements varies with the wavelength of light
    Spectroscopy
    1. the branch of science concerned with the investigation and measurement of spectra produced when matter interacts with or emits electromagnetic radiation.
    Need a chair?
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2021
  15. BillJ

    BillJ Canon Warrior Premium Member

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    For your copy and paste?
     
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  16. 'Q'

    'Q' Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Dude, when I'm using my 20 inch Dobsonian to look at point of light (which most stars are on Earth) I'm not going to push it to 500x on a night of poor seeing. When I'm at 250x, I'm usually using a 4 lens component, magnesium fluoride coated surface Plossls from Tele Vue or better. Barlows are shit and induce visual issues.
     
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  17. Dryson

    Dryson Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    I seriously doubt if you have a 20" Dob.
    This is a 14" rig.

    https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fb...r:tds_flgs.3:ott.AX-xu9HFR9ZSwG_L&__tn__=EH-R

    There really is no sense in buying a $10,000 telescope to image close galaxies through.

    The type of rig that I am talking about would be on the order of 50 billion dollars, just for the mirror and focusing lens along with other top of the line equipment that would be used in space or on the Moon.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2021
  18. 'Q'

    'Q' Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Who said anything about buying, I ground my own scopes in the late 90s by importing 2 inch thick Schott glass blanks from Germany and hand grinding. AND here's a 5 buck trick for noobs..my 20" f4.5 used for deep sky can be f-stopped down to a 8" f12 using a piece of cardboard for planetary work if desired.

    Ever seen M42 or M104 in a 20 inch?
     
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  19. Dryson

    Dryson Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    You made your own telescope, nice job, but the quality is not going to be as good as the machined optics of a commercial rig.

    Now,
    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddar...apor-on-habitable-zone-exoplanet-for-1st-time

    Is there anyway that you can grind a lens to detect more water around a star using Spectroscopy?

    If more amateur astronomers could track water using star max like rigs, we could more easily track down potential flows of molecular based water in Space.
     
  20. 'Q'

    'Q' Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Two things: 1) Grinding mirrors by hand produces a much better job than machined jobs. Machines do not have the randonmess of a human to ensure all zones are ground correctly, therefore optical flaws are more common in commercial products. 2) Why grind lenses, that require two optical surfaces to be produced, when you get better buck for using Newtonian reflectors. Which major observatories are using lenses on their telescopes?
     
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