For USS Franklin Fans

Discussion in 'Star Trek Movies: Kelvin Universe' started by shapeshifter, Aug 5, 2022.

  1. shapeshifter

    shapeshifter Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    So in case you don't get down to Fan Art I've brought a recent addition from there to you here. This is an abridged version of my Fan Art post with just the ship, the whole ship and nothing but the ship.

    Star Trek: Beyond U.S.S. FRANKLIN NX-326 1/350 Spotlight.

    The Kelvinverse. Love it or hate its story, most agree the minor ships are pretty cool. Two minor ships available in kits nailed their alternate universe designs with bold determination for going somewhere new...

    What an amazing kit! So detailed, and practically built itself. Very easy primary assembly. Some small parts had me fumbling in secondary and final assembly, but having the right tool made it easy.

    Cast your gaze....

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    Chemical thrusters may have saved the day, again, but that doesn't distract from this blockbuster design.
     
  2. JoseNoodles

    JoseNoodles Captain Captain

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    Is it a snap together kit, or is glue needed?
     
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  3. shapeshifter

    shapeshifter Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Glue was required. Testors have a new super-glue for models that is less messy and faster drying.

    It isn't perfect for all models, a weak, easily broken hold can occur with some plastic types, but it worked great here.
     
  4. JoseNoodles

    JoseNoodles Captain Captain

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    Thanks for the info. I have to get into making models someday.
     
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  5. Ar-Pharazon

    Ar-Pharazon Admiral Premium Member

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    Cyanoacrylate based plastic glue? The Zap line always had Plasti-Zap, which I always found to be the best for models.
     
  6. Richard S. Ta

    Richard S. Ta Commodore Commodore

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    I suspect by the sounds, and seeing Testors to, that's it's closer to polystyrene cement or 'plastic glue'. Literally melts a bond between plastic pieces, but doesn't work on some plastics.

    @shapeshifter Never mind the model, we need a picture of your glue. :D
     
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  7. Ar-Pharazon

    Ar-Pharazon Admiral Premium Member

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    That doesn't sound "new". @shapeshifter said "super glue", so I started thinking about the glue I used to use.
     
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  8. Richard S. Ta

    Richard S. Ta Commodore Commodore

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    I was under the impression it was new as in just bought rather than just released... like I bought a new cup yesterday, but it's not a new design of cup.

    I'm sure all will be revealed later in the day. I actually have a fascination with glue.
     
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  9. shapeshifter

    shapeshifter Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    The reveal...

    [​IMG]

    Per the ingredients list, that's exactly correct.

    This doesn't melt parts like traditional glue, in my experience. No fusing like with traditional glue. it sticks to both surfaces but bonds to itself. In some cases of misalignment I have been able to make a clean break at the spot then reposition with fresh glue.

    I first found out about it with the new DS9 reissue, with its clear plastic parts. It was the recommended glue to use.

    I liked the ease and speed so much I started trying it on all kits, but found it is weak on some non-clear plastic.
     
  10. Richard S. Ta

    Richard S. Ta Commodore Commodore

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    Ah, it's just good old superglue then!
     
  11. Ar-Pharazon

    Ar-Pharazon Admiral Premium Member

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    I've found that straight super-glue is generally worthless on standard polystyrene plastic. A hobby shop I worked at many moons ago had an AH-64 Apache model someone used super glue on, and after some time parts started falling off and after we took it down, we pretty much 100% disassembled it without any broken parts. Cyanoacrylate works best on materials with slight absorbent qualities and not so much on smooth surface materials.

    The stuff I used to use, Plasti-Zap, is a combination of plastic welding and cyanoacrylate. Probably 5x as strong as normal plastic cement. Once those parts are together, they are never coming apart again. It was especially effective when I scratch built a USS Nebula pod out of a USS Enterprise E saucer and some other misc parts.

    @Forbin what's your favorite model glue?
     
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  12. shapeshifter

    shapeshifter Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Yep. Super Glue working is a crap-shoot but worth trying for drying time savings, keeps the job moving. I never used/heard of Plasti-Max, what are the benefits over regular glue?

    But with a brand-name scalp-tax! lol
     
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  13. Ar-Pharazon

    Ar-Pharazon Admiral Premium Member

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    Plasti-Zap melts the plastic, probably more effectively than plastic model cement or glue, but also contains cyanoacrylate.

    I don't know the exact way those two ingredients work together, but it's the best model glue I've ever used. My Nebula and Romulan BoP (kitbashed out of an Ent-E kit) have been through a couple moves since I built them 20 years ago, and are as solid as ever.
     
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  14. publiusr

    publiusr Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Anyone know if ultrasonic welding has been adapted for hobby use?
    https://www.stackplastics.com/ultrasonic-bonding

    It can fuse different plastics. Don’t think it works like a soldering wand though.

    I take it back:


    That might be better for Borg ships…where you can use a flat base. I wonder if you held it near the base of a pylon…it would loosen things where you could adjust nacelle droop by hand.
     
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  15. Kor

    Kor Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Interestingly, I've done some kitbashing with PLA and I use that exact Testors Cyanoacrylate super glue. I find that if the face of the material is smooth then I have a really hard time getting it to stick at all. But if the surface has been roughed up with sanding or filing, then it sticks quickly and firmly. I'm not sure if that would make a difference with polystyrene.

    Kor
     
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  16. Ar-Pharazon

    Ar-Pharazon Admiral Premium Member

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    For super glue, there definitely needs to be a less than smooth surface, if it's somewhat porous, even better. I tried using it on a resin key I made in shop class a reeeeeeeally long time ago, and it wouldn't stay together for anything.

    Even with lead miniatures, I usually used a mini drill and pins for things like arms, dragon wings, etc. whenever there wasn't a really well defined socket there.
     
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  17. shapeshifter

    shapeshifter Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Thanks. <nods> Does sound useful for fitting pieces not designed to be fitted.

    I feel confident, the type of plastic a model is molded from is why. Some work, some don't. Some to varying degrees. I keep both kinds nearby.

    Of course in all cases, wash parts with soap and water or wipe connect points with alcohol, (beware of melting if too high %) to remove moulding residue. It seems to especially mess with SG.

    I am going to need a bigger desk, someday. ;)
     
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  18. Ar-Pharazon

    Ar-Pharazon Admiral Premium Member

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    Definitely this. The cyanoacrylate might act as a little bit of a gap filler as well.

    I remember filling in some spaces when all I had was very thin plastic strips. I was able to laminate several layers to get the desired effect thanks to the strength Plasti-Zap.
     
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  19. publiusr

    publiusr Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Anyone try the trick of mixing super glue and baby powder like Adam Savage has?
    I’d get it in my eyes for sure. I can’t use Stanback powder without choking on it.
     
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  20. Ar-Pharazon

    Ar-Pharazon Admiral Premium Member

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    I don't think I've ever heard that until today. It makes it more of a filler.

    Apparently, adding baking soda to super glue accelerates the curing process. Though they make an accelerator spray for the same purpose. I used the spray with lead figures to get joints to set so they wouldn't sag and/or fall out (whenever I wasn't pinning the joint).