DC Comics Ongoing Discussion

Discussion in 'Science Fiction & Fantasy' started by theenglish, Dec 19, 2020.

  1. kirk55555

    kirk55555 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Just finished a reread of Crisis on Infinite Earths. Its still a masterpiece, not just the best event comic ever made but just an amazing book in general. I still get chills when the Anti-Monitor first shows his face, and during moments like Supergirl and Flash's sacrifices. Also George Perez was on his artistic A-game the entire time, not only is the art great in general but he might be the best artist ever when it comes to drawing large groups of pre-established characters (which was something he really liked doing, from what I remember of an old interview with him). A 10/10 book, and I'd say a must read.

    It is so obvious how badly both Countdown to Final crisis and Scott Snyder's BS Death metal retcons don't work at all with the original COIE, which had definitive (and well written) origins for the Universe, Monitor and Anti-Monitor. I don't know how anyone could read COIE and then tolerate any of Snyder's junk especially, its like letting a particularly dumb 4 year old draw over an original van Gogh or da Vinci painting.

    I'm now reading The History of the DC Universe, the Wolfman/Perez direct follow up to COIE that tells the history of the new single universe all in one place, and its a really fun informational book even if it was probably at least partially out of date within a year or two of publication. It has given me some information about the Post Crisis Universe that I never knew, and some characters I'd never even heard of, which is a fun experience at this point. My copy also has a great Alex Ross cover, which goes well with the amazing Alex Ross cover of the COIE TPB.
     
  2. The Realist

    The Realist Vice Admiral Admiral

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    While I don't think as highly of CoIE as an overall narrative as you do (though its importance and influence, for good and ill, cannot be denied), Supergirl's death is a hugely effective and emotional moment. That close-up of her eye as she realizes what's coming ("Oh, no"), and her final words to Superman (particularly the way she doesn't ask him if she was brave, but affirms it for herself -- she knows she was, without question), get me every damn time.
     
  3. Kai "the spy"

    Kai "the spy" Admiral Admiral

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    DC actually just started a series of facsimile editions of the entire CoIE series with a monthly release schedule. While I already have the Tpb, I'm looking forward to re-reading this series in this way.
     
  4. The Realist

    The Realist Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I have the Deluxe Edition hardcover of the series, which is my favorite format for reading graphic novels. A little oversized, giving the artwork some extra room to breathe, but not as unwieldy as Absolutes.
     
  5. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

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    I have Marv Wolfman's signature in my collected edition. I was going to get George Perez but the line was too long and I wanted to watch The Walking Dead panel. So i figured I would get it next time. Shortly afterwards, he was diagnosed with cancer and quit most public appearances. Should have stuck out the line a little longer.
     
  6. kirk55555

    kirk55555 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    So I've been reading some Batman, specifically the Second Chances TPB (as prep to rereading Death in the Family, the Second Chances TPB includes Jason Todd's post Crisis origin and early adventures as Robin), and I have to say reading mid 80s post COIE Batman has really helped me remember why I like the character. In modern comics Batman can't go two seconds without running into some new secret organization or conspiracy that will change everything he knows about Gotham, or he'll have an ally die or he'll lose his wealth/gain it back, etc. Basically we don't live in the era of well written standalone Batman stories being anything but a rarity, and reading this older stuff is just great. Its Batman being Batman, but the stories are about him and the crimes he's solving, not whatever city/worldwide emergency that is going to blow up Batman's life next.

    The good thing about it being in the 80s/Post crisis though is that the writing is a lot more sophisticated then the Silver Age stuff, so while a lot of it is standalone you get a lot of great stories with good characterization and there is the occasional serialized element added to spice things up.

    For example, I just read Batman #414, where Batman tires (and fails) to catch a serial killer who is killing women and dumping their bodies into dumpsters, Along the way he saves a woman from a burning building and becomes (non-romantic) friends with her as Bruce Wayne, just for her to be murdered by that killer, which shakes him up emotionally so bad he completely screws up trying to catch and capture the killer. Its a bit "women in refrigerators" I guess, but as a one shot story showing how Batman's emotions can effect things its very powerful, and makes the reader care about whats happening. I think this killer actually comes back later in the run so I'll be checking out those issues, but I just wanted to mention it because its a standout story of a type that I feel we don't get much of anymore.Even if it didn't have a follow up the issue still had a beginning, middle and end, and it was well paced. Nowadays it feels like no one can tell a story in comics in less then four issues, and Batman never really gets time in his main comics to just be Batman and protect Gotham.

    Anyway these are just some thoughts I had. As for the comics in the TPB I've been reading overall, Jason really isn't a bad Robin, but I guess he can be a bit abrasive and him dying is probably worth it for the stories that come out of the event. Also I didn't know that Jim Starlin did DC work but he's very solid on Batman, I've always associated him with Marvel Cosmic stuff just he does good work for DC, too.
     
  7. the G-man

    the G-man Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Yeah, I miss first fifty or so years of largely standalone stories where Batman was a detective who solved crimes with a combination of brains and brawn and the gadgets were more James Bond than Tony Stark.
     
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