Daredevil season 3 Marvel/Netflix

Discussion in 'Science Fiction & Fantasy' started by Turtletrekker, Jul 22, 2016.

  1. cylkoth

    cylkoth Commodore Commodore

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    ^ This isn't like the Sony/Fox deal, where those 2 licensed Marvel characters, gaining control over their live action appearances in films made by them. The Netflix shows were simply ordered by them, and are actually owned and produced by Marvel Tv thru ABC Studios.
    Unlike Sony with Spiderman, and Fox with X-Men, Netflix holds no claim to the IP, only streaming rights to continue offering the episodes on the service.
     
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  2. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    If Netflix wanted to order any more Marvel productions, they wouldn't have cancelled the ones they already had.
     
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  3. JasonJ

    JasonJ Commander Red Shirt

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    I know exactly what you mean by this "anxiety". Karen Page (as portrayed- I don't think this is DAW doing it poorly, just how it is being done) always acts as if she's watching the "doors and corners" expecting something to come in or happen from off-screen.. like she isn't where she should be and just stole the Crown Jewels and may get caught.
     
  4. crookeddy

    crookeddy Commodore Commodore

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  5. Professor Zoom

    Professor Zoom Admiral Admiral

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    I think Parrots information has been floated around before. Since Netflix doesn’t release viewership, there’s no way to confirm.

    Also: it maybe true, but it might not be enough to offset the cost of something they don’t totally own. The original Battlestar Galactica was successful in its first season, it was just to expensive to justify the cost.

    This has been Netflix’s problem since the beginning, they were only licensing material. Material that could get pulled. That’s why they got into original content.

    Why continue to spend money on something you don’t own fully? When you can spend that money on something you do? Netflix is making the same sort of business decisions other broadcasters make.
     
  6. theenglish

    theenglish Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    This is definitely a business decision, and apparently something with the contracts signed between Netflix and Marvel. There appears to be something in those contracts that Netflix does not like. Perhaps similar to an actor contract where extending the deal beyond this point requires substantially more financial (and creative control?) investment than was initially planned/expected? It certainly has to be more complicated than just Disney is opening a new streaming network. And it has to be something that has come up recently otherwise Netflix would not have ended the recent seasons of its shows the way it did.

    I would certainly appreciate one more series (Defenders) that wraps up the dangling plots, but that would probably be too much to hope for.
     
  7. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    As the article linked above explained, they realized that most of the viewers of the Marvel shows were already Netflix subscribers anyway, so the shows weren't enlarging their subscriber base and therefore weren't making them significantly more money. And keeping them around as free advertising for Disney+ could cost them money. These decisions always come down to bean-counting and profit vs. loss.
     
  8. Professor Zoom

    Professor Zoom Admiral Admiral

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    I think it’s more simple. It’s the expense wasn’t worth it. It didn’t get them more viewers. It wasn’t cost effective. They didn’t own it. Why keep it?
     
  9. grendelsbayne

    grendelsbayne Commodore Commodore

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    I do wonder what kind of time frame they were looking at, though.

    Obviously, I can't just assume my case is typical, but I definitely did sign up to Netflix for the marvel shows and I definitely have noticed a slow but steady decline in the amount of stuff they're offering that I want to see. As long as they had Marvel and Star Trek, I was a guaranteed subscriber. Now they're giving up Marvel and if CBSAA goes international, they may lose ST, too. There are still some shows available I really love (Sabrina, Stranger Things, The Good Place, Dirk Gently) but they're really heavily spaced out across the year, and they aren't even all Netflix owned, either. And their available choice of movies has been rather disappointing for a while. All while the competition is starting to heat up more than ever.

    For now, this change isn't a deal-breaker, but if this kind of thinking becomes a habit, I honestly think it could wind up hurting them more than helping them in the long run.
     
  10. Saul

    Saul Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Just finished season 3. Outstanding.
    The best season of any comic book TV series.
    I would love to see the creative team behind this continue, if not with Daredevil than another Superhero.
     
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  11. Turtletrekker

    Turtletrekker Admiral Admiral

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  12. OCD Geek

    OCD Geek Commander Red Shirt

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  13. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Why blame Marvel for it? It sounds to me like it's the sort of thing that the distributor, i.e. Netflix, would put in their contracts for the content they acquire. That kind of exclusivity period is pretty common in entertainment contracts. The people who buy the rights to distribute a creative work want to be able to do so exclusively for a certain period of time so they don't lose money to competitors. For instance, when I sell a short story to a magazine, the contract usually specifies a term during which the magazine's publisher has exclusive rights to the story -- sometimes a month, sometimes 6 months, sometimes a year -- and I have to wait until that term expires before I can market or republish it anywhere else. That's entirely fair, because they're paying me for the right to publish the story and they deserve the chance to profit from that without anyone else undercutting them.

    So this 2-year delay before anyone else can use the property seems entirely routine to me, and there's no reason to interpret it as anything screwy or malicious.
     
  14. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    And the cancellations themselves came entirely from Netflix, apparently Marvel didn't even know they were being canceled until they were.
     
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  15. fireproof78

    fireproof78 Admiral Admiral

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    Nope. Just business.
     
  16. Anwar

    Anwar Vice Admiral Admiral

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    This is entirely on Netflix, they're canceling the shows because they don't want to pay Disney for the right to make these shows when Disney will have it's own service soon. And they had these contracts to make sure that the characters they made popular in the current public consciousness can't be immediately used by Disney as well.
     
  17. The Nth Doctor

    The Nth Doctor Infinite Possibilities... Premium Member

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    Well damn. There goes that theory. I guess this is truly the end for all of those shows. I can't see any of these shows, even Daredevil, returning after a two-year hiatus. :(
     
  18. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    There was a gap of 2 1/2 years between Daredevil seasons 2 & 3, and 2 1/3 years between Jessica Jones seasons 1 & 2, although The Defenders did happen in between those.

    And we live in a time when shows from a decade or two ago keep getting revived -- I think it was just announced that they're bringing NYPD Blue back, for instance. And lots of British shows go on break for a year or two or even more and then come back, like Red Dwarf and Sherlock.
     
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  19. The Nth Doctor

    The Nth Doctor Infinite Possibilities... Premium Member

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    ...when they were actively working on those shows through pre-production, writing, filming, post-production, and anything in between. While it's not clear what "can't use for two years" explicitly means, I'm sure that means at least filming.

    Yes, but those shows are planned towards reviving depending on people's careers and in many of those cases, their careers are opened enough to easily fit such revivals (obvious exceptions include John Goodman and Laurie Metcalf). While I wouldn't say any of thes leads are big stars on their own right, they are at least rising stars (particularly Cox and Ritter) and all of the actors in these shows still need paying jobs. If there's no guarantee work for two years (returning to the previous point about the two-year gap), then there's a good chance of someone joining another show or movie that prevents their commitment for returning.

    I'm surprised I have to point this out to you, but British and American shows are produced very differently, which results in the infrequent series and the reduced number of episodes.
     
  20. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Of course that's true. I'm just saying it's possible to bring casts back together after they've moved on to other things. It's not guaranteed, no, but it's not absolutely inconceivable either. Look at, say, Alien Nation. The show was cancelled for budgetary reasons, the network tried to find a way to revive it as TV movies, but they couldn't work it out and the cast and crew moved on. But then, 4 years later, they finally did manage to get the TV movie revival underway and were able to reassemble the entire cast. It can happen.


    Yes, obviously, it has been that way in the past. But we live in an age when the nature of American television is changing. Streaming TV on subscription services is closer to the British model -- shorter seasons, less dependence on a constant stream of commercial sales, more shows built around prestigious actors with other demands on their time. My point is that just because things have historically been a certain way, that doesn't mean they'll inevitably stay that way.