Considering writing my own fanfiction?

Discussion in 'Fan Fiction' started by bobjuh, Nov 21, 2019.

  1. Admiral2

    Admiral2 Admiral Admiral

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    Okay.
     
  2. Sgt_G

    Sgt_G Commodore Commodore

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    Again, I said if they are expected to be operational for many weeks / months on end, you need a larger crew. You can't run people on 12-hour shifts (or 6-on/6-off) for long periods of time. Trust me on this; most of my 26-year military career was working rotating shifts to cover a 24/7/365 mission. I've been on several deployments and field exercises with minimum manning; I've worked plenty of 12-hour shifts. Two weeks with no days off is about the max a person can handle before starting to burn out. Tired people make mistakes. You don't want that in space.

    If it's a small ship that has a home base, so it goes out and back for a few days (no more than about two weeks), then, sure, no problem with a small crew. You can reduce the duty positions by doubling up on tasks. Just put two people on the bridge, a pilot-in-command and co-pilot if you will. They will share flying, navigation, communications, and sensors. The ship's commander and second-in-command will work opposite shifts. I'd still want at least two people in the engine room at all times (save for quick restroom / meal breaks). Ergo, if you're insisting on 12-hour shifts (or 6&6), then you only need two teams of four people. There's eight of your crew. So, yes, you can make it work with 12-15 people.

    On the other hand, if this was my ship/story (but it's not!), I would go with three teams, and at least a third person on the bridge, which brings it up to 15 people. I'd round the crew out with another 6 to 10 specialists (medic, gunners, etc), or more depending on the mission statement and combat capabilities of the ship. The ship I'm writing about is a patrol cutter with a crew of about a hundred. It's small but is still a fully capable warship that goes out for six months or more at a time, so it has three 5-man teams each on the bridge and in engineering, accounting for a third of the crew.
     
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  3. Grendelsbayne

    Grendelsbayne Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I've worked on similar ideas for my own concept in the past, but for an original ship idea not what's being based on here (essentially a single deck, long-range scout/explorer that goes out for a few months flying an arc through unknown space scanning everything it can and investigating nothing further).

    I came out to 24 crew - 3 shifts of 8 people. 3 on the bridge, 2 in Engineering, 1 in Medical and 2 as Security/gopher/fill-in for whatever needs temporarily filling in. Plus maybe once a week an extra 2 hour shift doing administrative/logistical duties if necessary.
     
  4. Gibraltar

    Gibraltar Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Depending on the era you choose for your stories, a small scout assigned to longer missions would make sense. For instance, in my series, set right after the end of the Dominion War, Starfleet losses necessitated having small scouts and even runabouts patrolling sectors that used to be guarded by starships. Having a crew pulling a longer-than-usual mission under these circumstances while shouldering the burden of trying to run a ship with insufficient personnel might have some great story-telling potential. :)
     
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  5. SLWatson

    SLWatson Captain Captain

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    Honestly, bobjuh, it's your story. Write it how you want to write it, with whatever crew assignments work for you to tell the tale you want to tell. If people don't like it, they don't have to read it. I'll reiterate what I said before: Have fun. That is the first, last and most important part of telling stories, so don't get too caught up in the minutiae here. And anyway, nothing says your first draft is going to be your only draft or that you can't tweak things later.

    But first, just write and have fun.
     
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  6. JLBTucker

    JLBTucker Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    For me when I write my fan fiction I tend to stay away from established characters. For example when i write mt fan fiction it is set 20 years after the events of STO and make the universe my own doing things that would make sense in the Trek timeline. I think the trap a lot of fic writers do is mess with established characters too much my advice to make it your own.
     
  7. Danja

    Danja Captain Captain

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    I've done both (I LOVE writing for Seven of Nine).

    I've also created my own characters.
     
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  8. JLBTucker

    JLBTucker Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    I tend to stay away from established characters because what ever I do might come of as a little too "fan ficy" as using established characters for me i might be temped to go too far.
     
  9. MrPicard

    MrPicard Jean-Luc's Loving Husband Premium Member

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    Same here. I love writing Jean-Luc (even though he can be VERY tough to get right) but I'm also cool with creating my own. What I also like doing is "expand" characters that weren't given much screentime.
     
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  10. Danja

    Danja Captain Captain

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    I use the "AU" (or Alternate Universe) tag. (I like to play with Seven's weapons. Just WHAT is she packing that Voyager didn't find?)

    It allows me to write what I want (and I usually have people coming along for the ride :) ).

    AUs are fine so long as you let people know what they're in for.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2020
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  11. Sgt_G

    Sgt_G Commodore Commodore

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    Agreed. I don't mind seeing "real" Trek characters popping in for a brief cameo role, but I think it's best if you write about new characters. You'll have a blank slate to work with, and thus you won't have to worry about getting "everything right" to match all known data about the "real" cast.
     
  12. SLWatson

    SLWatson Captain Captain

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    What's wrong with something being fanficcy? None of us are getting paid for this. XD I write canon characters because they're the ones I love. I write OCs when they make a good story. I write canon characters and OCs being friendly or in relationships or whatever with each other because why not? It's still all down to being a labor of love, so write what you want to write.
     
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  13. Bry_Sinclair

    Bry_Sinclair Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Can't really add much that hasn't already been said: focus on the characters, just get writing, etc.

    What I would add, on a ship that size with just 15 officers and crew aboard, I'd suspect they'd be more generalists than specialists, with all of them being trained to man any station as required. That way you wouldn't have to double up on posts, so that during emergency/tactical situations with the CO, Conn, Ops and Tac crewmembers in place, a complement of engineers in the engine room, the remaining crew are ready for damage control, security cover or carrying out first aid, whilst during normal operations then you'd have the bridge covered by either the Conn/Ops/Tac operator and a deckhand for support, a couple of crew in engineering and one floater (e.g. corpsman, deckhands, security chief), whilst the staff of another shift is sleeping and the third is enjoying some downtime.

    But that's just my rambling thoughts.
     
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