"Ask" as a noun

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by LaxScrutiny, Apr 22, 2022.

  1. CorporalCaptain

    CorporalCaptain Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    ^ I don't think this is any more complicated than that not everyone gets conjugation, participles, tenses, infinitives, particles, etc.
     
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  2. Jack Wolfe

    Jack Wolfe Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

    Oof. No wonder your post sailed right past me. I couldn't see a problem with it. :alienblush::lol:
     
  3. Jim Gamma

    Jim Gamma This space left blank intentionally. Premium Member

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    It's enough to make you cheesed off, I guess? :D
     
  4. dupersuper

    dupersuper Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I would have thought the same thing about "I seen" rather than "I saw" before I started at my current job.

    Keep in mind many of those instances could be spellcheck/autocorrect errors.
     
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  5. Mojochi

    Mojochi Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Whenever I hear learning as a noun, I hear Jethro from The Beverly Hillbillies. I done got me some learning at school today.
    Bah... I'm good with alright, just as much as I am with already or altogether. They have grown to have different applications as much as all ways & always.

    I'm all ready already. We're altogether enjoying it, all together. I was all right about being alright.

    Don't even get me started on albeit :p
     
  6. Mr. Laser Beam

    Mr. Laser Beam Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Meh, I’ll get over it. It’s all gouda.
     
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  7. scotpens

    scotpens scotpens Premium Member

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  8. Timewalker

    Timewalker Cat-lovin', Star Trekkin' Time Lady Premium Member

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    I recently re-watched Pierre Trudeau's "fuddle-duddle" video (someone else made it, of course) just to hear a politician make excuses that were mostly grammatically correct.

    There's a guy from somewhere in the U.S. who decided to use "fuddle-duddle" in place of "fuck" in his gaming forum's autocensor.

    That's just... beyond bizarre.

    I'm reminded of a vitriolic argument I got into with a few people back in 2009 (they didn't like my opinions of the first nuTrek movie). There are times when I go into "Spock mode" when posting. My grammar is as perfect as I can manage, sentences are crisp, and everything is punctuated correctly.

    The reaction one person had was weird. He thought my first language wasn't English.

    This was as weird 13 years ago as it was last week on a gaming forum when someone ranted at me about my not being a native English speaker. The forum admin asked for feedback and I gave her some about a couple of technical issues.

    There have been other instances, but at least one guy simmered down when I explained that I became a Star Trek fan at the impressionable age of 12 and had strict English teachers in school and college. By the time I went online nearly 30 years later, my habits were fairly well entrenched.

    That sounds like something that would only make sense on Arrakis, if you could ask someone if they've been put through the death-still and rendered down for their body's water. That would have to be a somewhat metaphysical conversation, though, as an affirmative answer would mean the person was dead.

    From episode 2 of The Story of English. :D

    This is my favorite episode of this documentary series. It's a 9-part series about the history of the English language, and though some of it is extremely dated at this point (no pun intended), I still enjoy it.

    This episode is special because it gets into Beowulf, there's a musical rendition of part of that work, and toward the end we're treated to Mary Tamm (who played the first Romana in Doctor Who) being coached in how to correctly pronounce the words in The Canterbury Tales (for an audio version).



    I'm not sure if there's any site where you can see the entire series. YT would be the best bet.

    Back in the '80s and '90s I had a home typing business. Most of my clients were college and university students, and hindsight has made me grateful that the worst I had to contend with was messy handwriting and one guy who absolutely insisted that he really did want to include a very vulgar sentence in one of his term papers (I warned him that his instructor wouldn't be impressed, and she wasn't; I hope the fun he got out of it was worth the grade deduction).

    I don't know if I could have handled internet slang and urban slang in those days. I remember how hard it was to force myself to type "teh" when I began to get serious about making lolcat captions.

    Fast-forward a decade or more, though... both the Bible and at least some of Shakespeare have been translated into lolspeak. Someone even translated an entire episode of Star Trek, complete with kitten-themed "commercials".

    Kirk didn't say "groovy" but Roberta Lincoln did in "Assignment: Earth". :p

    I use that word now, as a way of expressing sarcasm. If you ever spot it in any of my posts around the forum, chances are that I was not in a good mood at the time I typed it.

    I don't understand why people think spell checkers are the final authority. They're only as accurate as whoever programmed them. Try being a Canadian who is used to using a variety of British, American, indigenous, and French spellings for particular words, and as far as Canadians are concerned, they're all correct. The American-programmed spell checker, however, thinks I've made a mistake and gives me one of those obnoxious little red squiggly lines underneath perfectly acceptable words.

    So it's still correct to use them when referring to the residents of my apartment, then. My cat is a person.

    I just don't understand why people use autocorrect if it keeps getting things wrong. A CBC journalist whined to me in an email about it when I emailed him to let him know how unimpressed I was with the number of mistakes in his article.

    I really don't care. He's being paid to be a professional journalist. I suppose proofreaders are a relic of the past, but there really isn't any excuse.
     
  9. CorporalCaptain

    CorporalCaptain Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    I didn't say it was. All it means is that the spelling is in its dictionary. I cited a well-established and reputable dictionary in addition to that, and I didn't claim that was the final authority either.
     
  10. LaxScrutiny

    LaxScrutiny Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    I think the thing about spellcheckers is, people use them. If there is a common error, such as then/than that spellcheckers miss, it becomes even more common and accepted.
     
  11. CorporalCaptain

    CorporalCaptain Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    That's not the fault of the spellchecker. In that example, the spellchecker misses nothing, because both are words spelled correctly. The problem there is in expectation by the user that the spellchecker functions as a grammar checker. If it's just a spellchecker, it doesn't.
     
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  12. LaxScrutiny

    LaxScrutiny Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    Totally agree, up to a point. Writing requires at least a bit of effort to use appropriate words, tone, and intent. It's fine to use spellcheck and grammar checking but pay attention, learn as you go, and care about what you write. (Not directing this at you personally.)
     
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  13. scotpens

    scotpens scotpens Premium Member

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    That kind of satire has been going on for ages. Mad magazine did the same thing back in the 1960s when they "translated" Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and Hamlet's "To be or not to be" soliloquy into beatnik slang.
     
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  14. LaxScrutiny

    LaxScrutiny Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    I miss Mad Magazine. I know it is still online; I mean the good-old newsprint with a fold-in back-page cover. Sigh.

    ETA: And Damn!! There are actually new issues on paper that come in the post!! I'm all in!
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2022
  15. Timewalker

    Timewalker Cat-lovin', Star Trekkin' Time Lady Premium Member

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    Beatnik slang doesn't come with cute cats and kittens.
     
  16. scotpens

    scotpens scotpens Premium Member

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    But it does come with cool cats.

    [​IMG]
     
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