When Do You Get Cold?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by JD, Dec 11, 2021.

  1. cosmic mouse

    cosmic mouse Commodore Commodore

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    ~50 F/ 10 C

    Mediterranean climate is my preferred climate, but I'm stuck in New England for the time being.
     
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  2. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    It amazes me out here, how much a difference the sun and wind can make. I was more comfortable out this morning in 46F with the sun and almost no wind, than I was on one of my rides last week, when it was in the mid 50s, but cloudy and very windy.
     
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  3. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Vice Admiral Admiral

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    It really does. And it can actually feel warmer with snow than without due to the snow acting like an insulator. I actually find lots of wind without any snow on the ground to be quite brutal.
     
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  4. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah, winds can be pretty brutal in both heat and cold. When it's 120 out and you get a wind blowing, it feels like you're standing in front of an open oven with the temp turned up to the max.
     
  5. There Be Whales Here

    There Be Whales Here Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Here in the Land of Eternal Sunshine we have two seasons- summer for about ten months and winter for the other two. As a result of the constant heat and thinning blood due to living here so many years now, anything below I'll say, 70, is basically reach for at least a light jacket and wear long pants weather.

    It's all about acclimatation and perception since one will easily find tourists from colder climes and countries that visit during the colder months walking around in T-shirts and shorts while residents are breaking out the moderately heavy coats.

    While I acknowledge feeling cold in 50 or even 60 degree temps, it seems to affect the wife even more who will wear a sweater around the house or even to bed certain parts of the year. Our winter comes later than most in about January and February and can reach the 40s or even 30s only to warm up for a few days before going down again. While that can be an advantage to saving on A/C for a few weeks or months out of the year; having to put the central heating on makes up for the savings (if anything the heat seems to run up the bill more). So there really are very few days where there's a middle-ground and one can just open a window, which is unfortunately for the kitties as they consider it a rare treat.

    The way things look now, I'll likely be able to wear shorts and a T-shirt on Christmas or at most jeans and a light jacket once the sun goes down. There are times I really miss the seasons and even sometimes, snow.
     
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  6. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Vice Admiral Admiral

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    So, like a hair-dryer then? ;) Things must not stay wet for long!
     
  7. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah, that's probably a better analogy. During the hottest part of the summer you can put a wet blanket, or clothes outside and it will be dry within an hour or two.
     
  8. Finn

    Finn Bad Batch of TrekBBS Premium Member

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    I had a prof in graduate school, who had the heater in her office on full blast....in the bayous of southeast Texas, in the summertime. :eek:

    She was from Africa.



    As for me, it often changes depending on my mood. I'm a native New Englander who have been in Texas for 5 1/2 years now. I still can't stand the Texas heat. I miss the cool and crisp mornings of New England summers, with chilly dew on the grass.
     
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  9. JirinPanthosa

    JirinPanthosa Admiral Admiral

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    I guess somewhere around the low 40s. It's relative to how much you're bundled up, but that's around the time the hat and gloves go on.

    Also the activity really affects it. When I'm out running I can be pretty comfortable well into the 20s with the activity warming me up. But biking at 40 is frigid, with the windchill and the more exposed fingers.


    I like the weather in New England from April through November, but would like to go somewhere like the Southwest the other months.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2021
  10. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah, kind of the opposite here. So much humidity and things take forever to dry. Kind of reminds me of the ol urban legend of drinking hot chocolate or any hot drink to cool you off. It only works if you're in an environment where the sweat you generate could evaporate quickly, as it's the evaporation that gives off the effect of cooling off.
     
  11. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    It's been starting out in the 40s on my bike rides a couple times now, but with the sun out, little wind, and a thicker jacket and gloves it's tolerable. The nice thing is that in the hour and a half to two hours I'm out, it warms up about 10 degrees, so by the time I'm about half way through, I'm comfortable. There are even some rides where I start cold, but by the end I'm hot.
     
  12. Mrs. Silvercrest

    Mrs. Silvercrest Captain Captain

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    It takes a lot to make me cold. The snow we are getting will do it though!
     
  13. publiusr

    publiusr Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Wet damp cold is worse to me than dry cold.
     
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  14. maneth

    maneth Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    And humid heat is a lot worse than dry heat to me.

    As a kid, I had no problems with the cold. Now my sinuses are killing me as soon as it drops below 0 C, and in my climate, that's at least 6 months out of the year. We get at least a few days of -20 C or colder every winter. Sometimes a cold spell can last for weeks. The coldest temperature, not counting windchill, that I remember experiencing, was -36 C/-33 F. I was 15 and schools were open...

    Last summer was a hot one. Here, the definition of a heatwave is 3 or more days in a row of at least 25 C/77 F. Last summer, we had more than 30 days of maximum temperatures reaching at least that number, 10 days (not consecutive) of at least 30 C/86 F, and at least 7 tropical nights, when the temperature never drops below 20 C/68 F. The temperatures themselves may not look extraordinary to people who live in hot climates, but the thing is that houses here are built to keep the heat in and the cold out, and most people don't have any way to cool their houses beyond table fans and keeping the windows open at night. We have a portable AC unit, and heat pumps are becoming popular.
     
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  15. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Yep, got lots of that here. And it can make the windchill feel that much colder. That windchill can make an otherwise balmy -10 feel like a -20.
     
  16. think

    think With love ❤️ Premium Member

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    I had chills last night after the 2 nights before being intestinally upset to where Imodium didn't do anything.. Still weak today but feeling better. It's the same chills I got after the first Covid-19 vaccine.. I guess a brush with Covid but after the 3 shots I'm good.
     
  17. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Yikes, hope you feel better soon.
    After living in the desert for 20+ years, it's hard for me to imagine not having air conditioning.
    I still don't know how people survived out here before AC was invented.
     
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  18. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Vice Admiral Admiral

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    AC would be considered a luxury over here :D
     
  19. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    I have a feeling heat in the winter for you, is probably pretty much the equivalent to our AC in the summer.
    I follow a competitor from American Ninja Warrior who lives in Alaska, and a few weeks ago he posted a video where he was outside and it was -22°F, I can't even wipe my mind around that kind of cold.
     
  20. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah, pretty much. Plus, some houses have heated floors which is a nice convenience.

    Ohh speaking of outside temperature, the coldest recorded temperature is I think some place in Siberia. Yakutia, Siberia, in fact, clocking in at -76C/-96F! At that temperature, water can freeze nearly instantaneously and skin exposure would lead to frostbite within seconds. I really don't know how people can live there, let alone adapt to the environment.

     
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