Trek as life philosophy

Discussion in 'General Trek Discussion' started by Ziz, Oct 19, 2009.

  1. Ziz

    Ziz Commodore Commodore

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    Was talking with a friend earlier, she mentioned how different writers have given her her overall philosophies on life and it got me thinking of sci-fi philosophy, particularly Trek related.

    What are the quotes, scenes or episodes that have shaped your life and train of thought over the years? What from Trek have you taken to heart and made part of your outlook on life and its many issues?
     
  2. Joshua Howard

    Joshua Howard Captain Captain

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    Spock...

    The fundamental of Vulcan logic-based life; particularly the very relatable struggle of Mr. Spock between emotion and logic.

    Inevitably, the price of placing reason ahead of emotion is a certain detachment from social circles and - by choice - unrelatability to other people's emotional conditions; but for me, being able to step back to and rely on the fundamental of logic has been an ongoing lesson, and one which I was inspired to pursue much because of Star Trek.

    Understanding the greater good has been important to me, and because of the complexities of life, sometimes hard to come to a concrete conclusion on. The above phrase has been burned into my mind as one of my core beliefs; the importance of non-objective reasoning, and the understanding that sometimes it is necessary to throw out the book of black and white morality and pick up the scales of justice. In other words, sometimes there is no right answer, and the best choice is not one to be proud of; but being able to make that choice is critical nevertheless.

    This phrase is also important to me. It says much more about what life really means than the typical "Hello" that we all give and recieve. Life, longetivity, and prosperity is its theme; and for being three adjectives, it contains a massive amount of philosophy.

    And Picard...

    Remember the scene in First Contact when Picard shows the earth woman - Lily, I believe her name was - earth from the viewpoint of the Enterpirse? Great stuff; and that is, naturally, the biggest lesson that Star Trek introduced me to.

    When I first started watching Star Trek, I was just beginning to emerge from an isolationist fundamental Christian sect; long story short, my mind was closed to the world, closed to the town down the street; closed to everything except what I had been raised to believe. Star Trek played a major role in making me realize how big existence and life really is, and how much we as a human race can dare aspire to become. In a philosophical sense, it was like looking out the window of that starship for the first time.

    And, of course, there is the added fact that - because of Picard - I bought my first box of Earl Gray tea packets, and liked them enough to keep right on buying them.

    I would say that about 50% of my philosophical, political, and economic worldview has been impacted by Star Trek; the other 50%, from real-world history.
     
  3. A beaker full of death

    A beaker full of death Vice Admiral Admiral

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    You'd have to be pretty shallow to adopt Trek as a philosophy. I'm reminded of a quote by Irv Kershner, the director of Empire Strikes Back:
    "[Yoda] has a basic philosophy that is very charming. Not very profound, although young people consider it profound. I wish they would read more."

    That said, I model myself on Captain Kirk. I don't run around going to conventions and wearing silly costumes. I go out and explore the world, get laid, eat the peach, and grab life by the short hairs.
     
  4. C.E. Evans

    C.E. Evans Admiral Admiral

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    I don't think of Trek as a life philosophy, but I do think there are lessons from Trek that can be applied to life such as not judging people solely on their appearances and to think before you act...
     
  5. Ziz

    Ziz Commodore Commodore

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    That's what I mean. Not physcially living like you're a Trek character with the costumes and the rubber ears, just taking the attitudes and philosophies that Trek stories were based on thematically and applying that way of thinking towards life.
     
  6. NickInABox

    NickInABox Captain Captain

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    Rip your shirt, mack on chicks, punch a few lizards...
    Yup.
     
  7. Sci

    Sci Admiral Admiral

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    I don't think Star Trek by itself can really be much in the way of a life philosophy. But Star Trek can inspire the viewer into researching real philosophies. For instance, part of my interest in American and international politics stems from my having been inspired by Star Trek's insistence that humanity can build a better future for itself, can unite in peace, freedom, and equality, that our species is not doomed to an endless cycle of wars.
     
  8. marylizz

    marylizz Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Realize it or not, a person's views and philosophies are formed by experiences. Including what he watches on television. I think it's a very valid point that a television show that perhaps goes a little further than the average show in the areas of philosophy, life and the human experience would impact one's values and ideas.

    Personally, it has always made me feel a little bit hopeful. I lean toward the cynical and a good dose of Trek always makes me take a slightly more uplifted view. And, on a side note, I had an extreme fear of space as a child, and the mention of the expansion of the universe used to give me panic attacks. Science fiction opened up the idea that, though the universe is immense, there is no reason to fear it. Instead, embrace it.

    =)
     
  9. marylizz

    marylizz Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Yes! Yes, yes! Especially today in times of tension, apprehension and fear, this is such a valid point to mention. The hope is so appealing, that we just might get out of our primitive sand traps that are our mistakes alive, to achieve a better future.

    Right on, man.