The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Thank older producers to for that. Most still saw any reference to the Beatles as meaning the "She Loves You" period.

    It the curse of the "vacation" episodes of any show. Even though this was all on the lot, the plots always feature too many main characters tagging along to some new location, when there's no real reason for most to appear.

    Yes, she should have been front and center as a villainess. We were fortunate to get what was offered.


    Carson may have used it, but numerous soaps--the major soaps--were already using composers to create real scores, such as Robert Cobert's work on Dark Shadows.
     
  2. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Thanks, Mister DJ!

    Nice. :rommie: This is why I love the 20s/30s....

    This is a classic.

    This is a good one, nice and catchy.

    Not bad. I like Gypsy and I've seen it a few times, but the songs are the kind of show tunes that are enjoyable during the show but I have little desire to listen to later.

    Same with this one.

    Or first contact with the Betazoids. :rommie:

    That's interesting. I loved that song-- and Chaka Khan in general.
     
  3. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    Kitchen Sink Review Business


    _______

    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for 55 years ago this week:
    _______

    12 O'Clock High
    "The Loneliest Place in the World"
    Originally aired September 13, 1965
    The Season 2 opener is dedicated to introducing our newcomers to the main credits:
    • Paul Burke as Lt. Col. Joe Gallagher (star billing)
    • Chris Robinson as Sgt. Sandy Komansky ("also starring" billing)
    • Andrew Duggan as Brig. Gen. Ed Britt (guest star billing, but recurring for the remainder of the series)
    Still also starring from last season:
    • Frank Overton as Maj. Harvey Stovall
    Outside the opening credits, Barney Phillips will still be recurring as Maj. Donald "Doc" Kaiser, but he's not in this episode.

    The teaser is dedicated to killing off General Savage in the most awkward way possible...without ever seeing Robert Lansing's face or hearing his voice. Most of the incident is told from the POV of Gallagher's bomber, and Savage's radio is said to be out (which also covers why it's left to Gallagher to approve of the stray B-17, secretly manned by Germans, entering formation with Savage's squadron). After Savage's bomber is shot up, we cut into his cockpit, to find its crew (including Sgt. Komansky) reacting to Savage having been killed while the general's body remains just out of the shot. (We see what's supposed to be his shoulder, but it's not even clear if there's an actual actor in the pilot's seat or if it's just a dummy.) Later at the base, when General Britt dramatically removes Savage's photo from a board showing the 918th's chain of command, his hand completely covers it the entire time.

    Lt. Col. Gallagher is temporarily serving as Savage's deputy commander when the incident happens. Gallagher's briefing with General Britt doesn't sugar coat Gallagher's contentious relationship with Savage, which is good continuity. Paul Carr appears as Lt. Col. Heindorf, a candidate for taking over command of the squadron. But he and Robert Colbert's Lt. Col. Bailey get on Britt's bad side when he walks in on them plotting a revenge mission against the German ambushers. Gallagher is the only on-camera contender who doesn't want Savage's job, but he nevertheless delves into his responsibilities as acting commander. Britt clearly feels that Gallagher is the man for the job, but he has to prove that to Gallagher.

    Meanwhile, Sgt. Komansky, the only survivor from Savage's bomber, clearly blames Gallagher for the incident. Apparently Komansky has a bad reputation in the group for having a chip on his shoulder when it comes to officers, which includes having evaded a promotion opportunity himself. Bailey doesn't want Komansky assigned to his bomber because he's a "sour apple."

    Gallagher is put to the test when he gives an order (following a new directive from higher up) to shoot down another suspicious B-17 on his next mission...but it turns out that despite the straggler's complete failure to use any method of communication, it was in fact manned by an American crew. Nobody in charge holds Gallagher responsible, but Gallagher blames himself.

    Komansky and Gallagher find themselves as rivals for Claudine Longet's character, a Free French operative in England. (Fortunately, she's not armed.) During a confrontation at her place, where a drunk Gallagher goes looking for companionship following the incident in the latest mission, Komansky goads Gallagher into laying hands on him for the opportunity to report the incident.

    On the next mission, Gallagher needs a flight engineer and Komansky is available, so he recruits the sergeant in spite of the charges. There's another straggler incident...only this time it is the German impostor crew, which Heindorf lets into the formation. Heindorf's plane is shot up (yet he isn't killed, which is surprising considering that he's being played by Paul Carr), and Gallagher risks his own bomber to give Komansky the opportunity to shoot the Germans down.

    Back at base, General Britt bawls Gallagher out over his actions and, when Gallagher refuses to back down, Britt immediately orders Gallagher's permanant assignment as group commander and promotion to full colonel. Komansky withdraws his charge, admitting to having provoked Gallagher, and is formally assigned to Gallagher's crew. And so all of our regular players are in place for the new season.

    This was a pretty meaty episode...lots of stuff going on, and a thorough exhibit of Burke's dramatic chops.

    _______

    Apparently Claudine Longet, who was married to Andy Williams at the time, had a recording career a bit later in the decade, with three singles that made the Hot 100 (including a cover of "Good Day Sunshine" in 1967) and two that bubbled under (including a cover of "Here, There and Everywhere" in 1967). Her highest charter was:

    "Love Is Blue (l'amour est bleu)"

    (Charted Feb. 24, 1968; #71 US; #28 AC; the original/definitive version of this will be popping up as 50th anniversary business in the first chart for the coming year)

    _______

    The Monkees

    "The Card Carrying Red Shoes"
    Originally aired November 6, 1967
    An episode full of characters doing Boris & Natasha accents isn't helped by the main guest character being named Natasha. The episode does have the novelty of the climactic music sequence not being set to a Monkees song...



    Mike's only appearance in the episode:

    "She Hangs Out"

    (B-side of "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You")


    "The Wild Monkees"
    Originally aired November 13, 1967
    This time, the story-disconnected song sequence is the episode's teaser:

    "Goin' Down"

    (B-side of "Daydream Believer")

    That was different...Micky stretching his musical legs. I like the vaguely psychedelic touches in the video.

    It's not knee-slappingly hilarious, but I'm starting to find the Monkees' style of staying in situation-assumed character(s) to be kind of endearing...e.g., their "club meeting," held in private. The biker ladies, OTOH, weren't strong on staying in character, taking the first opportunity to get glammed up and wear nice clothes, which made them a bit unconvincing in their roles.

    "Star Collector"


    Trivia point that I didn't catch, but read on IMDb: This is the first episode to feature Mike without his wool hat.

    _______

    At least when the Bradys went on vacation, they actually went somewhere! :lol:

    I was going for a Casey Kadence, but I'm not sure if it came through in the writing.

    Interesting. I've dabbled a bit in that era for my collection...I have a 2-hour playlist covering the '20 and '30s, and another 2 hours covering the '40s. Compare and contrast to 11 hours for 1967 alone.

    So maybe there might be some interest in a Rudy Vallée post. (He's appearing as guest villain Lord Ffogg in Batman's Londinium 3-parter.) I don't have any first-hand experience other than vaguely recalling his name as being that of a singer (perhaps due to some sort of childhood exposure in the '70s), but apparently he was a big deal in the music world of the '20s and '30s, one of the first crooners, predating even Bing.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2017
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  4. Kor

    Kor Admiral Admiral

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    Cool stuff. I was only familiar with Paul Mauriat's instrumental version of "Love is Blue."

    Kor
     
  5. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    In this era, I've found that there will often be multiple covers of a new hit song bumping around in lower reaches of the Hot 100.

    Miss Longet will also be popping up in a Rat Patrol multi-parter that's coming up soon in the 51st Anniversary Viewing.
     
  6. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    This was a dialed-in episode, only saved (somewhat) by Micky and Peter's constant (and clever) breaking of the fourth wall, with Dolenz's "Not bad for a long haired wierdo, 'at, America?" / "Ward, I don't want to be a chicken!" (meaning production executive Ward Sylvester) and Tork's "It can't be you every week" (to Davy about Natasha's interest in Peter).

    Slick Jeff Barry track. The first recorded version of this song appeared on Rhino's 1991 box set, Listen to the Band:

    As mentioned a few weeks ago, the fifth and final appearance of Henry Corden--this time as Blauner the hotel manager, instead of the long gone (by that time) Mr. Babbitt.


    Well, not really stretching, as every member had musical interests beyond the standard rock fare, with traces of said interest appearing on each new album. Micky was interested in jazz (he employs a bit a scat in this song), blues and other genres, so he was a natural for songs of this kind.

    Music snobs (aka "professional" A-holes) rarely give credit for this song being one of the first rock tracks to use the Moog synthesizer, with their "Daily Nightly" (appearing on the same album) very likely being the first.

    Yeah, but they took Alice. Alice?? That's like the One Day at a Time characters taking Schneider on a trip. For all I know, that probably happened....
     
  7. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    :lol: Didn't catch that one.

    I didn't say that it was a stretch, but that he was stretching his legs, as in exercising.

    But at least they took her to Hawaii and the Grand Canyon, instead of to redressed versions of the usual sets!
     
  8. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    But it was Alice! That's like Roger Collins taking Mrs. Johnson on vacation with him! :D
     
  9. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Well why not bring her? All he has to do is say he brought her, she doesn't actually have to be there.
     
  10. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Alice was a member of the family! :rommie:

    Harsh. But they would have had to pay him.

    I remember that. :rommie:

    Yeah, no glamour for this bunch.

    That must be the version I'm familiar with. I remember liking this song circa 1970, but I don't remember who did it. Oddly, I may be remembering an Andy Williams cover version, if that's possible.

    That was odd.

    Da doo ron ron? :rommie: That was not great.

    Yeah, more of a Micky solo there, but pretty good.

    Of this batch, this is the one that sounds most like the Monkees to me, but it's minor.

    In retrospect, yes. :rommie:

    In terms of social change, the 20s was very much like the 60s, on a smaller scale, especially for women, and it carried over into the early 30s (as the 60s did into the 70s). Popular culture also went through a similar period of uncensored freedom-- witness Pulp magazines and Pre-Code movies. Ultimately, the Depression killed it all.

    I can't say I know much, except that he had a Beatles-like effect on women, so a post about him should be interesting.
     
  11. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    The aforementioned Paul Mauriat instrumental version was a #1. I'd post, but it's coming up as 50th anniversary business in a little over a month. It looks like Longet's version was one of at least three covers that popped up lower in the Hot 100 in the immediate aftermath of Mauriat's.

    Alright, FWIW...we have a music career spotlight that's even more oldschool that Ethel Merman's....

    _______

    Rudy Vallée
    One of the sites that I use for chart information lists 71 Top-20 singles by Rudy Vallée & His Connecticut Yankees between 1929 and 1939, including these four chart-toppers:

    "Honey" (1929)


    "Stein Song (University of Maine)" (1930)


    "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" (1932)


    "Vieni...Vieni..." (1937)


    His last hit (billed as "Rudy Vallée with orchestra") was actually a wartime reissue of one that he'd done with the Yankees in 1931, motivated by the popularity that the song gained following its use in Casablanca:

    "As Time Goes By" (1943; #2 US)
     
  12. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    It was definitely not the instrumental that I remember, but I don't know if it was something on the radio or on one of the 8-Tracks we had.

    That classic 20s sound. :rommie: I'm sure I know this song, but a version by a female vocalist.

    Well, that's an odd one-- although maybe not, considering the youth culture of the time.

    This one is a classic, of course, and certainly a sign of the times.

    I don't think I've ever heard this one before.

    Another classic. And the theme is very interesting-- people being overwhelmed by progress and wanting to get back to the basics-- in 1931.
     
  13. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    51st Anniversary Viewing

    _______

    The Rat Patrol
    "The Gun Runner Raid"
    Originally aired November 28, 1966
    This is a half-decent little half-story (I'm probably gonna wish I'd saved that one for later), with the Patrol pretending to play along with the slimy arms dealer's offer to cut them in; the situation between the arms dealer and his wife; and the threat of Dietrich dropping by, which doesn't pan out (he isn't in the episode). This one had some dramatic potential that could have used more room to develop. Imagine, for example, if the arms dealer had the sort of pull to enforce a truce, and Dietrich sat at the dinner table with the Troy and Moffitt.

    _______

    TGs1e13.jpg
    "All About Ann"
    Originally aired December 1, 1966
    Of course, this is something of an idiot premise episode, but with some heart. Marlo does good insecure/heartbroken Ann, but it seems like they've already gone to the "threatened break-up with Donald" well a time too many. It also seems like something of a conflict of interest for Donald to be writing up his girlfriend in his magazine.

    This one had a location shot of Ann feeding pigeons in the park, I assume Central.

    "Oh, Donald" count: 2, plus an "Oh, Judy" and an "Oh, Donald" from Judy.

    _______

    Revisiting this...
    Lloyd's still working! I heard him on Cousin Brucie tonight.

    Revisiting this...
    I neglected to include some chart information...the version that was released on the single B-side charted separately the week of Nov. 18, bubbling under at #104.

    I love the song for that...not just being a song about the Depression that came out during the Depression, but the referencing of then-recent events such as World War I and the skyscraper boom. I have Bing's version (also a #1):

     
  14. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Where would sitcoms be without misunderstandings? :rommie:

    The skyscraper boom is the other half of the best-of-times-worst-of-times equation of the era. There was a strong Futurism movement as well. In one of my stories that's set in the early 30s, a woman says, "The world’s tallest building is being built... airships are filling the skies... a new planet has been discovered in the heavens. The future is here, now!" The people of the past didn't see themselves as being in the past-- what looks quaint to us was the cutting edge to them.

    That's probably the best version.
     
  15. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Cut to Rudy Vallée singing through a megaphone...then shaking his fist at those damn punks and their newfangled electric microphones!
     
  16. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Tales to Astonish #97, cover date Nov. 1967: Talk about an Undercover Doctor moment...!

    TTA97.jpg
     
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  17. scotpens

    scotpens Professional Geek Premium Member

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    :lol: Yeah, ya gotta be old enough to remember.

    Claudine played Ben Gazzara's girlfriend in two episodes of Run For Your Life and performed a bossa nova tune in Blake Edwards' 1967 comedy The Party starring Peter Sellers.



    I'd say her singing, with that little baby-girl voice and Elmer Fudd lisp, is definitely an acquired taste.

    Rudy Vallee also became a pretty good character actor in his later years. He was especially known for playing comic roles like the pompous, stuffed-shirt company president J.B. Biggley in both the stage and film versions of How To Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2017
  18. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Next thing you know they'll have electric clarinets or banjos or something.

    If he hadn't always refused to scrub, he could have gone far. :(

    I remember SNL (I think) doing a parody using gunshot sound effects and the "agony of defeat" clip from World of Sports. :rommie:
     
  19. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    A lisp is what Sylvester has, pronouncing "s" like "th." Elmer Fudd's speech impediment is called rhotacism. Well, actually it's both rhotacism and lambdacism, because he turns both R and L sounds into W sounds.
     
  20. scotpens

    scotpens Professional Geek Premium Member

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    I stand cowwected.