The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    Post-50th Anniversary Viewing

    _______

    The Mod Squad
    "Yesterday's Ashes"
    Originally aired September 28, 1972
    Pete and Linc are looking for some action, so they go for an off-duty stroll with Julie. A young female thief (Jo Ann Harris) bursts out of a jewelry store and runs to a beat-up old pickup truck. The stunt doubles each take a running board, but while Lucy quickly falls back off, Pete struggles with the driver (Robert Pine) until the truck runs off the road. The girl being unconscious, the driver runs off on foot. Pete ends up in the hospital and takes an interest the girl, who's also there and is identified as probation violator Sue Fielding, because she grabbed the arm of the driver--identified from mugshots as Jay Turner--when he tried to train his gun on Pete. While Linc and Julie fill some time trying to get a lead on Turner's whereabouts, Pete visits Sue with flowers and finds her attitude hostile and her lower left cheek cosmetically scarred in a way that's hardly even noticeable in long shots.

    Pete summons Sue's probation officer, Gloria Stone (Toni Moss), who explains how she considers herself a freak since her scarring in the house fire that orphaned her a few years prior, which motivated her to fall in with Turner. Pete gets the idea that if they fix her face, it might fix her head. The Mods get Greer to reluctantly go along with Pete's scheme, and back him into calling in a favor from an old college buddy who's now an expensive plastic surgeon, Dr. Leland Forrester (Ivor Francis). Julie approaches Sue with the idea, posing as a city employee recruiting her for an experimental program. Sue soon learns from Forrester that the idea for the surgery was Pete's, and takes more kindly to him on a follow-up visit, in which he tries to convince her to put her past behind her.

    Pete: Yesterday was, honey...today is.​

    On the eve of the surgery and under the influence of medication, Sue gets into the idea of doing something that could result in helping others like her. Meanwhile, Jay's hiding out on the tiny ship of an old cellmate named Jerry (Nino Candido), paying his room and board by holding up a liquor store. Linc finds him celebrating at a Mexican restaurant hangout afterward, but he gets away.

    Cut forward six weeks, to the day the bandages are coming off. Pete, no longer a fellow patient, gives Sue the gift of a hand mirror. Everyone's pleased with the results, and Sue spends a day paddle-boating with Pete. Over fried chicken in the park, she volunteers how she met and got into a relationship with Jay through a friend named Jerry. Later at Julie's, where Sue's staying, it becomes evident that she's now serious about Pete, and Linc convinces him to come clean with her that he doesn't feel the same way. Sue's outside feeling rejected afterward when Jay pops up out of the shadows...Jerry having been keeping tabs on Sue's whereabouts in previous scenes. He tries to recruit her into helping with a big bank job, and while she's reluctant to go back to that life, he plays the "I'm the one who loves you" card. She subsequently splits from Julie's pad, leaving a note that she's going back to her own kind.

    Let's go, let's go, let's go, let's go
    Down to Jerry's boat where I wanna lay low

    Mod88.jpg
    As Sue's heading to the bank with Jay in his new convertible, the Mods compare notes, identify Jerry Vincent as a guy who's been tailing them, and track him down...which includes Julie questioning a salty old seadog (Rusty Lane) who looks like he stepped out of a clam chowder label.
    Mod89.jpg
    Outside the bank, Sue tells Jay that she can't go through with it, and he angrily drives them back to Jerry's boat, the Roman Hawk, which Pete and Linc board without permission to rough up the captain for info. Jay comes upon the scene and tries to split down a dock, where Sue puts herself between Pete and Jay's gun. As Greer and uniformed CLE arrive, Jay resumes with splitting, only for Lucy to finally get his moment:
    Mod90.jpg Mod91.jpg Mod92.jpg

    Outside the county court house, Sue thanks the Mods for helping her turn over a new leaf, then exchanges more personal, regretful goodbyes with Pete. The two walk off in separate directions...Pete to the Mods' Season 5 wheels, identified as a 1972 Dodge Charger. (Looking that up, I learned that the Challenger convertible from the previous seasons was custom modeled for the show and ended up being restored by a collector.)

    _______

    Ironside
    "Programmed for Panic"
    Originally aired September 28, 1972
    The episode opens with a special talk program hosted by top-billed guest James Gregory as an unidentified TV presenter. The program is about the murder of an art student named Mary Belmont in a park, and its panel of guests include prominent criminal psychiatrist Dr. Albert Bartheim (Victor Izay); Congressman James Lowery (John Ragin); Mrs. Millicent Pyle (Scottie MacGregor), the widow of a respected theologian; and the Chief. Team Ironside and other police officers are manning phones to take any tips about the murder. The show is watched by a tensely drinking couple whom we eventually learn are Martin and Rhoda Lucas (second-billed guest Russell Johnson and Maggie Malooly).

    The post-break credits play accompanied by an unidentified mellow song about a lost love. The host gives what little details the police are supposed to have about the killer, including a sketch that vaguely resembles Johnson. But in actuality, the team is already onto Martin Lucas, whose apartment Ed has staked out while keeping in touch with the team via the phones they're manning; and the program is an attempt to draw out their suspect. The host plays interview footage of the first person who called the police after other neighbors refused to get involved during the noisy altercation that preceded the killing--Rhoda Lucas. Then, live in the studio, they bring on a young track star named Jimmy Sanders (Ed Begley Jr.), who attempted to pursue the assailant and found the body. Ironside publicly reassures him regarding his doubts about his bravery in failing to catch up with the killer.

    The next guest is Sandy Weiner (Kres Mersky), an operator for a student hotline to whom Mary had talked about an affair she was having with a married man whom she was routinely traveling into the city to see. Weiner breaks the hotline's usual confidentiality to give what details she knows about Belmont's lover, including that she'd made a sketch of him that she left at a mailbox or post office box via which she and her lover exchanged messages. Shortly after, Martin makes an excuse to his wife to go out for air. While the panel fills time with discussion of the nature of the crime and its perpetrator and witnesses, Ed and another detective (Fred Lerner, I presume) keep a close watch on Lucas, who first probes his wife for what she knows when she goes out to the park across the street that was the scene of the crime. The detectives then tail Lucas as he drives to a backlot bar where he continues to watch the program. In the TV station lobby, another detective (Vince Howard) has to deal with a serial confessor named Charlie (Al Checco). Lucas proceeds to a nearby post office as hoped, but after hesitating in front of the P.O. boxes only buys stamps.

    His next move surprises everyone, including his wife watching at home: he proceeds to the station and goes on camera with info about the girl. He claims to have witnessed from a distance prior meetings between Belmont and her lover, which included arguments; and describes what he recalls of the man, details that coyly match his own features. When he's done speaking, the Chief asks him to stay until after the program to give a formal statement. He has a soft drink in the studio's refreshment area and the Chief has Fran get some bags of peanuts and put them on the table. After watching from afar as Lucas puts peanuts in his bottle of Coke, the Chief brings Weiner back on camera to disclose a matching habit of Belmont's lover. The Chief puts the pressure on by talking on camera about how the killer's wife may come forward; and at home, a horrified Mrs. Lucas throws a dish of peanuts across the room. Then Ironside describes how their biggest source of help has been the killer himself, who left an amateur trail.
    Iron39.jpg
    Lucas attempts to leave, and when Fran approaches him, pushes past her and makes a break for it across the studio floor, to be pursued and apprehended partly on camera by Mark and Ed. The song reprises as the host thanks the audience while underscoring how the case has been solved before their eyes, and Lucas is taken out in cuffs.

    This one didn't work for me. The killer was so obvious that I was expecting a twist...perhaps that it was Mrs. Lucas who was actually involved somehow. They may have been going for a Columbo angle, where the audience knows who the killer is all along and it's about the attempt to catch him up in his lies. If so, from my limited exposure to that show, it fell short in multiple areas...most notably the rather lame "gotcha" moment, which didn't even involve a face-to-face confrontation with Ironside. What was more novel for the time--which I didn't catch until I read it on IMDb--is that the episode takes place in real time, over the course of an hour-long broadcast.

    _______
     
  2. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Not bad.

    And she's an action magnet.

    A fairly popular character actor from the 70s. I mainly remember her from a cool TV Horror movie called Cruise Into Terror (I think it was a Spelling production, too).

    This may not be proper procedure-- but then again, they're off duty. :rommie:

    She's Dr Doom. Actually, this dredges up a memory of a Doug Moench plot in Marvel's black-and-white Frankenstein stories from around this time or so.

    "Why, yesss, Adam, I'm always looking for young, female subjects. I mean patients."

    And how right she is!

    That was a tense moment.

    Actually, plastic surgeons have been helping criminals get out of trouble since Dark Passage.

    "It's... it's Donna Douglas!"

    Maybe he does, Linc. They went paddle boating.

    The scars were more than physical.

    :D

    "Ayuh, I've seen that young lady. She's as skinny as you are. Want to come in for some chowder?"

    First redemptive moment....

    Final redemptive moment.

    Lucy can fly!

    And Sue to Dr Forrester's black, unmarked van.

    That's cool. I like it when people preserve bits of pop culture history like that. This seemed like a nice, low-key episode, if maybe a little unfocused. And it sounds like they should have given her some more extreme scarring to justify her self hatred.

    Psycho psychiatrist and Inspector Luger, of course.

    Quincy's boss? Not sure.

    !!!!

    "O Canadaaaa...."

    Interesting premise, but it seems a bit far fetched that they could set this up. What's so special about this particular murder that they would go to such lengths? Unless it's an America's Most Wanted-type show, but that doesn't seem to be the case.

    Good twist.

    Fairly popular character actor, mostly in the 80s, I think.

    Also clever.

    Cute detail, but this should have been Fran. She didn't have much to do this week.

    Clever twist, but he doomed himself by coming up with it too late.

    An odd habit, but why not?

    "If the ratings are good, we'll be coming to you on a weekly basis."

    The thing about Columbo was the mental chess game between Columbo and the killer, which didn't happen here. There was a bit of a chess game, but it wasn't man to man. I had mixed feelings overall. The TV show gimmick seemed very unlikely, and the actual panel seemed pretty useless. On the other hand, there were a bunch of specific details that I liked.

    Interesting. They should have drawn attention to it by focusing on clocks and watches during scene transitions or something. Nothing so blatant as the corner clock that M*A*S*H used, though.
     
  3. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    I found her delivery to be somewhat spotty.

    She was so laughably Not Hideous that it undermined that whole angle of the story.
    Mod93.jpg

    [Edith Bunker delayed reaction.]

    Capped.

    :D

    Flying downward is easy. Lucy gets an upwardly mobile moment in the next one. Now I'm not going to be satisfied until I see him launch himself out of the drink like a Polaris missile.

    In this case it had a value to car collectors beyond its use on the show--the cars made for Mod Squad were the only two convertibles of that year's model.

    Seems so.

    :lol:

    It was a special presentation. The episode started with the host announcing that the regularly scheduled program wouldn't be shown, which was kind of meta, as if they were interrupting Ironside...if only they hadn't shown the opening credits.

    Best known for his regular role on St. Elsewhere.

    I got the impression that this was a ruse, though I didn't catch if they made that explicit.

    "I'm telling you, I killed her! That wasn't me making coffee at the Cave at the time of the murder!"

    Of course, my summary didn't get into the details of their time-filling talking head babble.

    Now I'm wondering if they were showing clocks and I hadn't noticed...if so, it was nothing that obvious.
     
  4. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Probably why she wasn't around more, but I remember noticing her name because she was a cutie.

    Yeah, not really compromising the cuteness at all.

    :rommie:

    :D

    That would be fantastic. :rommie:

    Wow, that's interesting. Makes me wonder why they went to that much trouble rather than just getting regular convertibles-- especially since the cars used on TV shows are pretty much product placement.

    Yeah, that kind of strains credulity. They should have made it a regular talk show.

    Aha, a show I didn't watch. It occurred to me later that he was in Transylvania 6-5000 and Amazon Women on the Moon, but I'm sure I saw him in other things too.

    Still, the PO Box was a nice detail.

    :rommie: I think I'm corrupting you.

    Oh, okay.

    Kind of a wasted gimmick if nobody notices.
     
  5. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    50 Years Ago This Week


    May 19
    • Valéry Giscard d'Estaing was elected President of France, defeating François Mitterrand by less than 425,000 votes out of more than 26 million cast, in what remains, as of the last vote in 2022, the closest presidential election in French history.
    • The Philadelphia Flyers won the 1974 Stanley Cup Finals, defeating the Boston Bruins 1 to 0 to win the series and the National Hockey League title, four games to two.

    May 20
    • U.S. District Judge John J. Sirica ordered President Nixon to surrender 64 tape recordings of White House conversations that had been subpoenaed by the special prosecutor, Leon Jaworski. Addressing concerns of national security raised by Nixon's attorney, Sirica stated in his order that he would listen to individual tapes to determine whether they should be withheld from release. The U.S. Supreme Court would ultimately affirm Sirica's ruling in United States v. Nixon on July 24, leading to the release of the June 23, 1972, "smoking gun" tape and Nixon's resignation.
    [T-minus 81 days and counting.]​
    • The U.S. Department of Defense created the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization as an office consolidating all U.S. ballistic missile defenses, to replace the Safeguard Program.

    May 21
    • The largest case of cheating at the United States Naval Academy was carried out at Annapolis, Maryland, when at least 60 and perhaps as many as 150 of 965 sophomore midshipmen were caught with the answers to the final exam in the Academy's class on navigation....The leaked answers were traced to a U.S. Navy quartermaster who had given the information to 150 sophomores, one-sixth of the class of 1976. The 965 all took a new final exam on May 29.

    May 22
    • The Disaster Relief Act of 1974, authorizing the U.S. president to make declarations in order to hasten the sending of federal money to disaster-stricken areas in the United States and its territories, was signed into law by President Richard Nixon, after having passed 91 to 0 in the U.S. Senate and 392 to 0 in the House of Representatives.
    • U.S. President Nixon informed the House Judiciary Committee that he would refuse to obey any further subpoenas for evidence or appearances.
    [T-minus 79 days and counting.]​

    May 23
    • The Airbus A300, the world's first twin-engine, double-aisle (wide-body) airliner, was introduced into commercial service with a flight by Air France from Paris to London.
    • David Frank Kamaiko, a 21-year-old man from Greenwich Village claiming to be a member of the Jewish Defense League, hijacked a helicopter from the East 34th Street Heliport and demanded $2 million in ransom. After landing on top of the Pan Am Building, the pilot tried to escape and Kamaiko shot him in the arm. The other hostage inside the helicopter disarmed the hijacker, and police took him into custody.
    • George Harrison forms a new record company, Dark Horse Records Ltd.

    May 24
    • Died: Duke Ellington, 75, American jazz pianist and bandleader

    [Not a word, Squiggy...]​


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "The Lord's Prayer," Sister Janet Mead (13 weeks)
    • "Mockingbird," Carly Simon & James Taylor (16 weeks)
    • "Touch a Hand, Make a Friend," The Staple Singers (13 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Keep on Smilin'," Wet Willie

    (#10 US; #55 UK)

    "On and On," Gladys Knight & The Pips

    (#5 US; #2 R&B)

    "Rock and Roll Heaven," The Righteous Brothers

    (#3 US; #38 AC)

    "Rock the Boat," Hues Corporation

    (#1 US the week of July 6, 1974; #12 AC; #2 R&B; #6 UK)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • Ironside, "Amy Prentiss: AKA The Chief" (two-hour backdoor pilot season finale)

    _______

    Timeline entries are quoted from the Wiki page for the month and Mark Lewisohn's The Beatles Day by Day, with minor editing as needed.

    _______

    I read that they actually took a convertible from the previous year and upgraded it with parts from the newer model.

    Nor did I, but I recall it being on the background. It might've come on after something I did watch. A quick search indicates the likely candidate as Night Court in the '83-'84 season.

    :D
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2024
  6. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

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    What's interesting is that he signed with A&M Records, while still under contract with Capitol/EMI to deliver two more records for the label; those being 'Dark Horse' and 'Extra Texture Read All About It'.
    George could still sign/record/produce other artists for the label, but he was contractually forbidden to do so under his own name.
    By the time he was free of his contract with Capitol/EMI in 1976, A&M records had grown impatient with George and dropped him and the Dark Horse label and artists from their roster; he was forced to sign with Warner Bros. to distribute his solo albums
     
    RJDiogenes likes this.
  7. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

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    Today marks the 50th Anniversary release of the Wizzard single 'Rock 'n' Roll Winter (Loony's Tune) "Sorry the word "Spring" wouldn't fit".



    It would reach No. 6 on the UK Chart.

    The reason for such an unusual title is that the single was meant to come out in early 1974, but was pushed back to 29-Mar-1974 before being released on 19-Apr-1974 because Wizzard's manager at the time Don Arden, had signed the band to Warner Bros without the band fulfilling its contract with EMI/Harvest; resulting in EMI/Harvest issuing the single first before being quickly withdrawn. Warner Bros. bought out the remaining portion of Wizzard's contract with EMI/Harvest, but the delay in getting the single to the market meant it missed its winter release. Copies of the single with the EMI/Harvest label are quite rare and expensive to find.
     
  8. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    I wonder if they had a problem with guillotined chads.

    Strange. I wouldn't think that a district court judge would have the clearance to review classified information.

    That's generous. I would expect all the cadets who took the info to be expelled.

    It doesn't matter what you do now, Dick.

    That was ill thought out.

    Squiggy says, "RIP, Sir Duke." [​IMG]

    This is a good one.

    This doesn't ring any bells. It's okay.

    Here's a classic.

    Another goodie. We'll be heading into some heavy nostalgia now. :rommie:

    Kit bash! :rommie:

    This is pretty good and definitely has that mid-70s vibe. I'm surprised they didn't make a bigger impression over here.
     
  9. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

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    I do find it interesting that several UK bands didn't make it big over here in the States. Slade, Sweet, T. Rex, Wizzard all toured and released singles/albums yet never seemed to grab the public's attention; yet I find it funny that acts like KISS and Alice Cooper are basically US versions of Glam Pop/Rock with the makeup and theatrics turned up to eleven.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2024
  10. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

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    So my experience with 'Dawn of the Dead' dates back to 1983 and opening of 'Return of the Jedi'. My Mom, brother, next door neighbor, her son and I were standing in line at the Overlake Cinema in Bellevue opening day (Friday) and I stepped out of line to go to the bathroom.

    Overlake Cinena had originally been a twin-plex that had recently been converted to a tri-plex by taking the larger of the two auditoriums and building a wall down the middle, creating two smaller theaters.

    Anyway, after leaving the bathroom, I snuck into Theater 3 to see what was playing. The trailer for a midnight showing of 'Dawn of the Dead' was just beginning.



    I distinctly remember the scene in the TV studio where Dr. Millard Rauche says, "These creatures are nothing but pure, motorized instinct. . . We must not be lulled by the concept that these are our family members or our friends. They are not. They will not respond to such emotions. They must be destroyed on sight!"

    Followed by clips of the bikers driving around the Monroeville Mall being chased by pale faced ghouls and the Goblin soundtrack blaring, then the words, "When there's no more room left in Hell, the dead will walk the Earth."

    I can't really describe what I felt; all I knew is that I had to find a way to somehow see that movie. Sometime later that summer (or possibly the following summer), when my parents were on vacation and my brother and I were with the babysitter, we went to the local video store and she let us rent a pair of movies. I chose 'Dawn of the Dead.'

    I don't remember being scared by it, probably grossed me out more than anything. I think I was more frightened/scared by John Carpenter's The Thing when we rented that for the first time.

    Edit to add

    Having thought about it some more, I realized that my first exposure to 'Dawn of the Dead' was much earlier than I thought; it actually dates back to August 1979 and the publication of the first issue of Fangoria magazine, which I got for my birthday.

    It had Godzilla on the cover and an article on makeup/special effects artist Tom Savini and the making of 'Dawn of the Dead', with several photos from the film and behind the scenes. So, I was already somewhat aware of the movie, but watching the trailer increased my interest.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2024
  11. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    The Sweet and T Rex did pretty well here, and I feel like Wizzard definitely falls into that category.

    I loved that slogan. :rommie:

    She was either a great babysitter or she had no idea what was in that movie. :rommie:

    It scared me in the sense of overwhelming existential dread. It was a great movie for triggering the feeling that the bottom had dropped out of society and sanity.
     
  12. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    Post-50th Anniversary Viewing

    _______

    The Mod Squad
    "A Gift for Jenny"
    Originally aired October 5, 1972
    Linc gets a call from an old childhood friend, model Jenny Drake (Gwenn Mitchell), because two men have been following her, and wouldja believe one of them is Bo Svenson again? She tells Linc that she thinks it has to do with a gift fur coat before Svenson's character, Sully, sneaks in her window and nabs her. Searching her place afterward, the Mods and Greer find evidence of a mechanic boyfriend named George Cannon (Booker Bradshaw), who acts evasive and unconcerned...but immediately afterward is visited by Svenson and his partner, Mike Keller (Del Monroe), who are using Jenny as leverage on behalf of a Mr. Logan (Paul Richards)...a man who uses a cane and is holding Jenny in a warehouse lair. When Sully and partner report to Logan, he sends them back on a follow-up visit. The Mods having learned that George served time for being a getaway driver in an armed robbery and that he and Jenny had filed for a marriage certificate, Pete and Linc arrive at his place shortly after the hoods leave to find that he's taken an involuntary dive from his apartment balcony.

    Greer turns up that the goons' car belongs to Dan Logan, a former racecar driver who was injured in an accident. The Mods follow various leads--Linc a salvage yard receipt that turns up that Cannon was trying to buy a garbage truck; Julie a tag from an exclusive fur line that has her questioning a dealer named Liz Martin (Charlene Polite), who subsequently calls her boyfriend, Dan Logan...who's planning a fur theft job with his goons but is now short a driver. Sully catches Pete searching Logan's sports car garage, and Pete tells Logan that he's a fan who's looking for a job as a driver. After Pete is let go, Logan takes to the wheel to give him an impromptu employment test, pursuing him on the road. Pete passes and subsequently gets a call that he's hired, though Logan secretly conspires to dispose of him when it's over. Julie has since learned that the fur was one that was stolen in a heist.

    At the warehouse, Jenny makes an unsuccessful escape attempt to show us that she's still alive. Logan & co. keep Pete in the dark about the nature of his driving job, but it involves donning a pair of coveralls that he saw during his previous snooping with the initials ARC on the back...even while Linc and Julie are running around trying to track down what those initials might stand for. Logan goes to the Mercantile Exchange to rendezvous with Liz regarding her part in the heist at the fur show being held there. Sully takes Pete to the garbage truck, which bears the same initials as its company logo. After they park the truck in an alley, Sully brandishes a gun to force Pete's continuing cooperation.
    Mod97.jpg
    (Maybe Pete's wishing that he'd kept King Arthur about now.)

    When the other Mods arrive at ARC Rubbish Collectors, Linc realizes that they've hit the jackpot, and Julie, knowing about the fur show, takes interest in one of their customers being the Exchange. Keller and the other two guys go up to the showroom posing as flower deliverers, pistol-whip the guards, put everyone in another room, and stuff the furs in bags that they toss down into the garbage truck. The Unknown Hoods walk out, while Keller rappels down from the window for some reason, and all hitch a ride in the back of the truck to where they have their switch vehicles stashed. Pete learns that he was recruited to do a speed run to the dock in a souped-up van carrying the furs, but they get a call that the boat's delayed, so it'll be normal-speed drive. (This is a pretty flimsy excuse for why they needed to recruit an outside driver.) The van arrives at the warehouse where Logan's been holding Jenny. Back at the Exchange, Linc's looked into a steamship company owned by Logan that appears to be a front.

    Linc: According to last year's invoice, they didn't carry enough bananas to cover a bowl of Corn Flakes.​

    This points Greer, Linc, and Julie to Logan's warehouse at the pier. When Greer and a couple of squad cars screech in and a firefight with the Unknown Hoods ensues outside, Pete uses the distraction to kick Sully down a flight of stairs. Logan comes out of his office holding Jenny hostage, but Lucy springs into action from an unexpected angle.
    Mod94.jpg Mod95.jpg Mod96.jpg

    As the baddies are loaded into the squad cars in the very brief coda, Linc and Pete credit to Jenny for giving Linc an opening by struggling with Logan. The squad cars drive off in one direction, while Greer's car takes Jenny and the Mods away in another.

    _______

    The part that I elided was an aside about another incident in the Air Force academy in which that happened.

    I have this, but it only rings a vague bell and doesn't particularly grab me.

    Been on the playlist for a bit. Has a good sound but not a classic.

    One of those songs that's kind of novelty-ish for referencing other recent/contemporary acts. In immersive retro context, given how recent it was, I have to think that Jim Croce's death was the catalyst.

    Pleasant oldies radio staple.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2024
  13. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

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    If you had asked me before 9/11 if the nation could have survived a Zombie apocalypse, i would have said "Yes".

    In the years since then, with the growing divisions in politics and society and since Covid, I think we're screwed.

    George was correct in saying that the Zombies aren't the problem if we keep our wits/heads about us, but there are those amongst us who would use the Ghouls as an excuse to get back at those they think have wronged them in the past.

    Me, I'm dead either way.
     
  14. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Bo Svenson and Bobby Sherman got a lot of work from this show. :rommie:

    I have to wonder why George is so important that they have to hold his girlfriend hostage. There's a lot of people out there with a driver's license.

    "Okay, but we'll need your girlfriend as collateral."

    Logan is a former racecar driver and his injury doesn't seem to impede his ability to drive-- why doesn't he take care of the driving himself?

    Yeah, not much of a part. Kind of a waste to make her an old friend of Linc's. It doesn't seem to matter a whit to the plot.

    Which doesn't seem to be much, since they have to clobber their way in.

    Was Pete being uncooperative? He's undercover! :rommie:

    Suddenly, King Arthur leaped through the passenger-side window, seizing Logan's face in his mighty jaws.
    "Who's a good boy!" cried Pete.


    Another big Mission: Impossible fan.

    I was thinking that when the Unknown Hoods showed up.

    Now I want some Corn Flakes and bananas.

    "Bully me with a gun, will you!?"

    Nice. He does have a lot of spring in his step.

    "That makes you a bit more than an extra."

    Quite a few plot holes there, and it was a total waste making the kidnapping victim an old friend of Linc's-- no emotional investment there at all.

    Ah, okay.

    It's not great or anything, but it has that warm glow of nostalgia.

    Kind of reminiscent of "I Dig Rock and Roll Music" in that sense.

    Good point. Probably true.

    As originally conceived, it's hard to swallow that a Zombie Apocalypse could happen, let alone so quickly, but the book World War Z (not the movie) does a great job of making it plausible. Then Walking Dead added the notion that the Zombie virus itself was fatal to most people, making it more realistic.

    It's a pessimistic age. :rommie: I'm actually more on the optimistic side. The Culture War is a very profitable industry, but I don't think it reflects the attitudes of most people.

    Yeah, that was also the approach of Walking Dead. The Ghouls or Zombies were the monsters, but people were the real threat once the thin veneer of civilization was stripped away.

    I would not be a Zombie Apocalypse survivor. :rommie: I've been having stress dreams about being chased by Zombies since I saw Dawn of the Dead back in 1978. Not so much since I retired, but I used to have them fairly frequently. :rommie:
     
  15. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2015
    Location:
    Bothell, WA
    @RJDiogenes

    A decade or so ago, I would have agreed with you regarding the culture war, but I know too many family and friends who, once Obama took office, became hard core conservatives and MAGA Republicans and started buying into what the right was saying and they used to be more middle of the road or liberal conservatives. Now, it's they're all out to get me, and they don't even know who "They" are.
     
  16. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    The Old Mixer, Somewhere in Connecticut
    Svenson was just on Ironside, the evil dog trainer whom the Chief sicced Otto on in the climax...hence the King Arthur reference.

    Seasoned getaway driver, but the canceled need for high-speed driving turned out to be a plot contrivance.

    :lol:

    Good question...maybe not to get caught/identified.

    They played some obligatory emotional beats to convey that the stakes were more personal for Linc.

    She expedited their being sent up when there was a crowd downstairs waiting to get in. They clobbered once they were in.

    He was kept in the dark that he was being recruited for a criminal scheme.



    He's also a real swinger...

    That's the one I was thinking of as well, though there are probably other examples that aren't coming to mind.
     
  17. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Location:
    RJDiogenes of Boston
    The persecution complex is part of the business model, Right or Left. The problem with most people is not that they're bad, just that they're uneducated and easily manipulated. They have to somehow be convinced that they only way to win is to not play the game.

    Yeah, but it seems like he was also an Evil Hillbilly on Mod Squad not too long ago.

    It felt pretty lackluster, and she was barely a character.

    Ah, okay.

    Still, pulling a gun on your driver seems counterproductive. :rommie:

    "You can't leave. The doors are locked from the outside." :rommie:

    A swinger, a springer, and possibly a web slinger. Stay tuned!

    "Smoke on the Water" comes to mind. I don't think "Sweet Home Alabama" has happened yet.
     
  18. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    The Old Mixer, Somewhere in Connecticut
    _______

    Post-50th Anniversary Viewing

    _______

    The Mod Squad
    "Taps, Play It Louder"
    Originally aired October 12, 1972
    On a dusty farmland road outside of Twin Roads, South Dakota, the Styles family--Fred, Eva, and teenage daughter Ellen (Robert F. Simon, Ann Doran, and Michele Nichols)--gather at a bus stop to welcome home son Jimmy...but the vet on the bus (Peter Hooten) hides in the restroom while crying hysterically.

    Three months later, Julie gets an unexpected visit from Mary Ellen--a cousin she doesn't know on her father's side of the family, Julie having only met Aunt Eva once, at her grandmother's funeral when she was six. Mary Ellen's made a stop on her way to Fort Ord in San Francisco, and has picked up viral pneumonia on her journey, a doctor confining her to bedrest. After Julie calls Aunt Eva, the Mods actually put quitting their jobs on the table to not only strongarm Greer into letting them investigate the situation, but to have him procure money from the department to fund the traveling involved! Pete heads to Fort Ord, learning from Army doctor Col. Brody (Bruce Kirby) how the injury for which Jimmy was discharged didn't involve brain damage, but that he may potentially be suffering hysterical amnesia; and is pointed to a former Army nurse, Carolyn Malik (Aldine), who treated Jimmy and wrote a couple of letters home for him, who in turn points Pete back to Jimmy's current residence in L.A.

    Linc flies out to South Dakota, where he tracks down and questions the bus driver (uncredited Karl Lukas), who tells of how he found the vet crying. Tracing the route of the bus, Linc talks to a general store owner (Dabbs Greer), who saw Jimmy switch buses to return to Sioux Falls from whence he came. Finally, Linc is met with hospitality at the Styles farm, Julie having called ahead. In L.A., Pete visits a motel where Jimmy stayed and questions the bartender (Timothy Blake), who indicates that he was looking for work at the docks. Pete soon tracks down his address, finding him not home but learning where he works. After Linc returns to town bearing pie from Mrs. Styles, he and Pete visit the warehouse where Jim works and are met by the pier boss, Frank Morrissey (Bill Zuckert) and a couple of strongarm types whom they start to put up a fight against. Frank and his daughter, Janet (Patricia McAneny), try to protect Jim, who soon comes out of hiding--now sporting bushier hair and a beard--and admits to having lied to Janet--now his fiancée--and her father about his family being dead.

    Mary Ellen denies any trouble between Jim and their parents, and the Mods learn that Frank subsequently called Jim's parents, who are on their way to town. Linc, having been studying the high school football photo of Jim that Pete was showing around, stakes out Jim's apartment and takes pictures with a telephoto lens--witnessing as Jim passes Mary Ellen, who left bed to go see him, and neither recognizes the other. When the Styleses arrive and are reunited with Mary Ellen and Julie, Linc shows them a picture that he just took of the bearded vet, and all three Styles inform the Mods that the man in the photo isn't Jim.

    The bartender and Carolyn Malik both confirm that the man in the photo is the Jim Styles that they knew. Pete and Linc follow up with Col. Brody, who brings in Tom Sanchez (Richard Yniguez), a paraplegic vet from Jim's platoon who identifies the man in the photo as Pete Gerard...a name that the Styleses recognize as that of a friend that Jim often mentioned in his letters. The male Mods tail Janet to a rendezvous with Pete at a boat that he's hiding out on, where she confronts him with having lied to her about his identity. Gerard runs from the Mods, fearing being sent to prison, and an acrobatic chase across the tops of boats ensues that gives Lucy a chance to play Errol Flynn.
    Mod98.jpg
    The Mods chase Gerard up the dock as the Stylses are arriving, and Gerard breaks down to them about how he buried Jim when he was killed in combat and took his identity because Jim was about to be sent home...explaining that he'd come to consider the Styleses a vicarious family and took the bus to Twin Roads because he had to see them once.

    The Styleses make some comments indicating that they plan to take parental responsibility for Pete, though there's no follow-up about this in the coda, in which Julie sees them off to their cab while turning down an offer to go back to South Dakota with them. The cab drives off and Julie walks back to the other Mods outside her apartment.

    This wasn't a bad episode, but it highlighted a number of the show's recurring storytelling weaknesses: Julie only getting attention in an off-duty capacity; the plot hinging on a contrivance that later has to be explained (Fake Jim taking the bus to Twin Roads); and Greer enabling the Mods' extracurricular activities, which was dialed up to 11 for the not particularly noteworthy occasion of helping a long-lost relative of the week who wasn't in any kind of danger.

    _______

    Ironside
    "Down Two Roads"
    Originally aired October 12, 1972
    Finally, the developments that we've been waiting for! After a scene of Mark and student pal Roger Stewart (Felton Perry) being helped with their tassels by friendly custodian Marty Chapman (Eugene H. Roche), the ceremony commences with the team in attendance; but as Mark's receiving his diploma, a pair of plainclothes cops arrest Marty off to the side.

    Another song plays over the post-break credits, as both the Chief and Mark have trouble sleeping. The two of them discuss Mark's prospects, with Mark being concerned that potential employers will mainly be motivated to curry favor with his current boss; while Ironside sounds a note of regret about losing Mark. Nevertheless, he's already lined up an interview with assistant D.A. Tom Ryan (David Spielberg) for a clerk's position. It turns out that Ryan's current case is convicting Marty, an ex-con who's been accused of a safecracking job on the campus. In a visit, Ryan tries to get Chapman to submit a guilty plea, while Mark advises him to get representation. Ryan explains afterward that he's trying to save the taxpayers some money. At the Cave, Mark and Ironside get into a spat over the Chief trying to prove that he can do things for himself. After Mark expresses his concern that Marty's being railroaded with nobody in his corner, the Chief's nudges him in the direction of going to Chapman to offer his help.

    Mark next sees Adrian Father (Michael Lerner), an overworked and jaded public defender; and attends as Father has a meeting with Ryan to discuss the details of the case. Mark becomes interested in fluorescent powder that was used in the safecracking and tries to track down an unusual purchase, learning from John Moore (Joshua Bryant) at United Chemical that a young black man (Conspicuous Guest Character Placement Alert!) recently bought a quantity so small that it had to be custom-packed. Mark has trouble getting ahold of the Chief, who's taking a driving test! After giving an ample demonstration of just how rusty he is in the Ironsidemobile, the Chief saves the intimidated examiner (Joseph Bernard) the embarrassment by flunking himself, while vowing to return when he's had more practice.

    Meanwhile, Father makes a case against Chapman while anticipating angles that the assistant D.A. will use against him. Frustrated that the Chief treats him like he's already gone, and that Lt. Reese isn't interested in investigating his lead, Mark goes to a party thrown by Roger, who's incredulous that Mark's considering becoming a public defender, and Mark's surprised that Roger considers Marty to be guilty, based on a claim of having seen Chapman on campus the night of the burglary, blowing his alibi. The next day, as he's opening the driver's door of the Ironsidemobile, Mark's surprised to find the Chief behind the wheel. Having since gotten his license, Ironside insists that Mark ride with him. As they discuss Mark's career decision and the Chapman case, something the Chief says has Mark request a stop at United Chemical.

    Mark presses Moore for more details, and learns that the suspect was exposed to the powder while it was being packed and that his car had a parking sticker from the college. Mark proceeds there with the Chief, who's procured a warrant to search a locker for tennis shoes and fluorescent powder. They and Ed find the latter, and next make a visit to Roger's place. When they ask to see his tennis shoes, Roger protests; but after Mark tells him that they found the powder, he tries to plead with them, not wanting his effort earning his degree to go down the drain. When they refuse to let it slide, he leaps out the window and threatens to jump from the fire escape, but the Chief gives him a tough talking-down, arguing that he can serve his time and start over again; and afterward underscoring the parallel with how he met Mark.

    In another sleepless night at the Cave, Mark reveals his career decision, informed by his recent investigative experience--that he wants to be a cop. After the Chief tests his sincerity in wanting to put his degree to work in a field that doesn't require it, he informs Mark that when he gives the speech at the start of the next academy class in a couple of weeks, he expects to see Mark there.

    Given the major series premise adjustments, this one really felt like it wanted to be the season premiere, or at least the first regular episode after the crossover.

    _______

    I think you might be blurring Bo Svenson with Bo Hopkins, the latter of whom is the hillbilly type who's been on recently watched installments of TMS and H5O, AIR.

    WRONG!!!

    See pic posted above.

    The latter is more of an answer song, but its album has recently entered the charts, so the single will probably be along soon.
     
  19. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2015
    Location:
    Bothell, WA
    Well, there's this (Paul to John)



    Followed by this (John to Paul)



    Then this (George to John and Paul)



    and finally this (Ringo to Paul)

     
    Last edited: May 24, 2024
  20. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2015
    Location:
    Bothell, WA
    I've also read and heard that this song



    Followed by this song



    Is Richard Davies throwing shade at Roger Hodgson for complaining about his upbringing/education.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2024