The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    It's always good to be pals with the bouncer. :rommie:

    Yeah, he's definitely more of an Andy at that point. :rommie:

    Okay, well maybe, I guess.

    Maybe that's it. Some sort of a contract issue with Davy Jones.

    Ah, but of course.

    That was funny. They did a great job with all those impressions. Too bad Asimov just stood there, though. :rommie:
     
  2. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50th Anniversary Viewing

    _______

    Adam-12
    "L.A. International"
    Originally aired March 12, 1974
    The officers head to the titular locale, identifiable by its distinctive Theme Building (as I've learned it's called). Woods is already embedded at the sub-station there, subbing at a desk, and the officers report to Sgt. Porter (Len Wayland), who reassigns them the designation Zebra-12, as with the last time they worked the airport. On a color(!) closed-circuit camera, Woods spots a burglar (Michael Bow) breaking into a parked vehicle, so the officers head out on their small motorcycles to intercept him at the under-construction exit road that he's headed for. They stop the car in front of the suspect vehicle to arrest the burglar as well as a driver, finding the stolen purse inside.

    After Jim annoys Pete over a spelling error as Malloy fills out the report, the officers are assigned to distribute alert bulletins to the airline desks. Pete's flirting with a pretty young ticket agent named Jody Drake (Tina Cole) when they witness two men fighting over a large suitcase (Geoff Scott and John Rayner, I presume). Each insists that the other is a thief until Malloy starts to open the bag to verify whose contents are inside, at which point both men try to retract their complaints. The officers find it filled with bags of grass, and suddenly each man insists that the bag belongs to the other.

    Malloy: I don't know what you guys are fightin' about. One of you's a pusher and the other one's a thief. We'll let the investigators sort it out.​

    In the terminal, the officers come upon another fight, involving one man accusing another of taking money out of his wallet. Upon breaking it up, they find that the accuser is a Marine (Mike Warren) who'd been showing wallet photos to the accused, who identifies himself as electronics firm owner Preston Franklin (Jordan Rhodes). Malloy asks to see the money in Franklin's pockets, and one of them turns out to be filled with a wad of Japanese yen that don't match his story of traveling to Chicago.

    The officers are subsequently flagged down by Ms. Drake, who alerts them to a repeat customer who's used credits cards under different names. They chase him down and find that a wallet he's dropped is full of cards under different names. At the station, Porter identifies the suspect as a Lester Harrison and gives the officers a little Webbian infodump about the nature of his bunco operation, which involves having an inside man in the card company's mailing department. He then assigns them to escort an 11-year-old runaway named Keith Wheatley (Scott Garrett) who's just been brought back from Chicago. The well-dressed young man matter-of-factly tells them of his previous attempts to go see his father, who's made to sound neglectful. At the station he's picked up by his mother (Eve Brent), who treats it all as an inconvenience and promises to send Keith off to a military school.

    Afterward the officers are assigned to a 211 silent at a toll booth, which they bike out to, finding the suspect holding a gun on the clerk. They pursue him into a busy parking garage and end up going on foot to inspect the vehicles stuck in the exit traffic. A van driver's grimacing expression and eye motions cue them in that the suspect is holding a gun on her from behind a curtain, so Malloy motions for her to jump out and calls out the suspect.

    Back at the station, Jody calls Pete to extend an invitation for the officers to join her for dinner at the Sky Room, hosted by the credit card company. Pete prods Jim to decline to attend.

    _______

    Ironside
    "Riddle at 24,000"
    Originally aired March 14, 1974
    Apparently I accidentally deleted my recording of this one, so I'll have to come back to it when able. It's too bad, I was looking forward to cracking a joke about a noteworthy guest.

    Riddle at 24,000 (1974) (imdb.com)
    Hey, Lucy, I'm home!

    This was the last regular episode for the season. A two-hour spinoff pilot will air as an Ironside installment in May.

    _______

    Watching a WWII doc show, I was reminded of something relevant to this. Crews who were engaged in nighttime firebombing, which was done at the relatively low altitude of 5,000 feet, could smell burning flesh.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2024
  3. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Cool. I never heard that.

    Damn. Demoted to the ass end of the alphabet. They even come after Starsky & Hutch now. :rommie:

    I wonder if that's accurate. Was it shot on location?

    Putt putt putt....

    So in the massive LAX parking lot, this guy breaks into a car and steals a purse, then heads straight for the exit. That sounds targeted. There was probably an episode's worth of story there. :rommie:

    :rommie:

    That sounds like the wife of the elder brother on My Three Sons.

    Can he do that?

    Seems like there's a backstory there, too. The thief knew enough to intercept the pusher. Was the pusher coming or going?

    And presumably matches the Marine's point of origin.

    He's pretty sloppy for a guy with an elaborate bunco operation.

    I imagine the guys did not solicit such a promise. :rommie:

    It seems like this would be something they'd both be required to decline.

    Well, how about that. He did hardly any acting in those days. I wonder what led him to that part.

    I feel like I know what that is, but I can't dredge it up.

    So much for bacon with my breakfast this morning. But, horrors aside, I think that fits the definition of rip-roaring blaze.
     
  4. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    50 Years Ago This Week


    March 18
    • The Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC), made up of Middle Eastern members of OPEC, formally ended the oil embargo declared by its members on October 17, 1973.
    • The U.S. State Department announced that the U.S. and Britain would assist Egypt in clearing mines from the Suez Canal in order to reopen the waterway between the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.

    March 19
    • Republican U.S. Senator James L. Buckley became the first conservative Republican in Congress to call for the resignation of U.S. President Richard Nixon.
    • Edward Platt, 58, American TV actor best known as "The Chief" on the television show Get Smart, died of a heart attack.

    March 20
    • In London, an attempt was made to kidnap Princess Anne, daughter of Queen Elizabeth II. Ian Ball, later found by a court to be insane, drove his Ford Escort into the path of an automobile bringing Anne and her husband Mark Phillips back to Buckingham Palace after a charity event. Ball began firing a pistol and shot Anne's bodyguard Jim Beaton; chauffeur Alex Callender; and tabloid reporter Brian McConnell and police constable Michael Hills. A passing pedestrian, former boxer Ron Russell, punched Ball and led Anne to safety.
    • Ugandan dictator Idi Amin ended the hijacking of an East African Airways airliner by talking to a gunman and his wife, and persuading them to surrender, while passengers watched. The Fokker Friendship plane had been carrying 33 other people in Kenya on a flight from Nairobi to Mombasa when the Ethiopian couple forced the pilot to fly to Kampala. A Dutch businessman aboard told reporters, "The president strode up to the cockpit of the plane and began talking with the Ethiopian at pistol point about an hour after we landed at Entebbe Airport. The gunman then threw his pistol from the plane onto the tarmac and he and his wife surrendered to the president," and added "Amin treated the hijackers like kings and seemed to be enjoying it."
    • Chet Huntley, 62, American journalist and anchor of NBC's Huntley–Brinkley Report from 1956 to 1970, died of lung cancer.

    March 22
    • The foreign ministers of all seven nations bordering the Baltic Sea—the Soviet Union, West Germany, East Germany, Poland, Sweden, Denmark and Finland—signed a treaty banning the dumping of solid waste into the body of water common to all of them, and to strictly control pollution from DDT and mercury.

    March 23
    • Brigadier General Charles Arube of the Ugandan Army began a rebellion at the Malire Barracks in Kampala, in an attempt to overthrow the government of dictator Idi Amin. Arube, and Lieutenant Colonel Elly Aseni, sought as well to rid the Ugandan armed forces of foreign mercenary officers. Although Arube's rebels were able to kill the 30 guards inside the presidential palace and to trap General Amin, the group hesitated at entering the command post to arrest Amin. General Arube entered the palace alone and was shot to death by General Amin.
    • Eight people were killed and six critically injured in a fire that began after a man threw a gasoline can and lighted fuse into a crowded bar in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Ernest James Burton Jr. walked to a police station and turned himself in, 23 minutes after starting the fire. Burton had attacked the Caboose Bar after being ejected earlier in the day.
    • "The Wall of Sound", the largest concert sound system up to that time, made its debut at the Grateful Dead's concert at the Cow Palace, near San Francisco. Designed by the band's sound engineer, Owsley Stanley, the Wall of Sound was composed of 604 total speakers with a combined 26,400 watts of power.


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Jolene," Dolly Parton (8 weeks)
    • "Show and Tell," Al Wilson (22 weeks)

    Recent and new on the chart:

    "Mighty Mighty," Earth, Wind & Fire

    (Mar. 9; #29 US; #4 R&B)

    "Oh Very Young," Cat Stevens

    (Mar. 16; #10 US; #2 AC; #51 UK)

    "The Payback, Pt. 1," James Brown

    (#26 US; #1 R&B)

    "The Entertainer," Music from "The Sting" feat. Marvin Hamlisch on Piano

    (#3 US; #1 AC; #25 UK)

    "You Make Me Feel Brand New," The Stylistics

    (#2 US; #6 AC; #5 R&B; #2 UK)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • Adam-12, "Clinic on Eighteenth Street" (season finale)
    • Kung Fu, "The Nature of Evil"
    • The Odd Couple, "One for the Bunny" (season finale)
    • Emergency!, "Inventions" (season finale)

    _______

    Timeline entries are quoted from the Wiki page for the month.

    _______

    The sub-station interior was probably a set, and the camera footage definitely seemed like TV fakery. But now that you mention it, the parts out in the terminals probably were location.

    She was, it seems, though I didn't recognize her. It looks like she had a recurring role on Hawaiian Eye before that; and had done four guest appearances as different characters in earlier seasons of MTS before joining the cast.

    Maybe. They were each claiming to be the victim of a theft; and there may be different search & seizure rules at play at the airport.

    Coming, I think...I was under the impression that the bag had just been picked up.

    The Marine was trying to tell them what kind of money it was during the argument.

    He wasn't counting on a member of the Douglas family!

    They did not...they seemed non-vocally wary of her attitude and intentions, and were sympathetic to the kid.

    Now that you mention it...though Pete could come unofficially as Jody's date.

    I thought that seemed pretty novel. It looks like his guest roles were pretty sporadic...the only thing we would have seen him on here was Laugh-In. The only recurring role in his credits was a character on The Mothers-in-Law.

    It came up previously, but you hadn't heard of it then, IIRC.

    Sorry about that. But if smells from a larger source can waft up into a bomber at 5,000 feet, then a house fire being smelled from a low-flying helicopter doesn't seem like such a stretch.

    The thermal updrafts from the city-wide fires also proved to be a source of hazardous turbulence for the bombers. But the reason the Air Corps chose to resort to firebombing was because the jet stream turbulence over Japan was so bad that daylight precision bombing from higher altitudes was virtually impossible, they couldn't get the bombs on target.

    Another grim factoid is that more people died from the conventional fire-bombing than from both atomic bombs.
     
  5. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    They don't like Americans, but they like American money. :rommie:

    Tick tock....

    Sorry about that, Chief. :(

    Holy Toledo, Ohio. I hope he got a knighthood, a horse, and a castle with a moat, or whatever the hell you give to people who save the freakin' princess with their bare hands. Life is indeed stranger than fiction.

    Stranger? Life is more mondo bizarro than fiction. :rommie:

    He was definitely a hands-on mass murderer.

    They'll do better.

    Classic.

    He's like the Energizer Bunny. :rommie:

    I do like this, mainly because it reminds me of the movie.

    This is a goodie.

    That makes me wonder if it was really shot on location, as I'd assumed.

    Good point.

    So the thief was trying to beat the pusher to the baggage claim. Inside job!

    That settles that. :rommie:

    He's lucky it wasn't Uncle Charlie. :rommie:

    That's what I'd expect of them.

    Probably true.

    Maybe something to do with friends behind the scenes or something.

    That's what's tickling my memory, I guess.

    Nah, I was just kidding. I have a stronger stomach than that at this point in my jaded existence. :rommie:

    Yeah, that makes sense. Still seems counterintuitive, though.

    Actually, that's a factoid I was aware of from my own research into the necessity (or not) of using those bombs.
     
  6. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

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    Best guess - there's about 12-14 people on that stage.
     
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  7. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    T-minus 145 days and counting.

    I cut out the part where they noted that there was a British TV movie about it.

    He was one of those names that I used to hear coming up in my youth, but didn't know much about.

    Pretty funky debut hit, though.

    This is one of his less memorable hits to me.

    He's actually getting close to the end of his original hitmaking run--only a couple more Top 40 singles after this, which will also be his last R&B chart-toppers, until he comes back with another Top 10 hit in 1985. "The Payback" was the title song of an album that was meant to be the soundtrack of a blaxploitation film, but was rejected by the producers, who reportedly "dismissed it as 'the same old James Brown stuff.'"

    I thought you might make a Squigception for this. The film, which came out Christmas of '73 and was the 1974 Oscar darling, I'm hoping to catch during the hiatus season. The single is one that I distinctly remember being out and about when I was a kid.

    I had to go back and look up my review of Butch & Sundance. Can you believe that came out five years ago, when I was the size of a cantaloupe?

    Now this is the Stylistics!

    Going back to look, I think the interior of the sub-station was a location, but the insert shot of the security monitor was totally fake--perfect-quality color, with a little subtle panning thrown in to follow the burglar's movements.

    One of them had a claim check, but there was no tag on the case to verify it against.

    I get the impression that Pete was ahead of the situation.

    :D

    Conventional historical wisdom is that an invasion of Japan would have been far worse for everybody.
     
  8. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

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    If either one of you has ninety minutes or so to spare, this goes into pretty good detail about the proposed invasion of Japan, the number of casualties on both sides, and the decision to use the atomic bombs.

    As a senior in high school back in 89, when our history class was covering WWII, we got together with the other two history classes and war gamed out and debated the various ways the United States could have achieved victory over Japan.

    We came to the conclusion that the only way to do it without avoiding mass casualties on both sides was dropping the atomic bombs.

    This is, of course, before a lot of the material regarding the invasion of Japan and the number of casualties, was declassified, as they're discussing here.

    It might sound cruel coming from a bunch of 17-18 year olds, to come the conclusion to use atomic weapons, considering we'd just went through the eighties with Reagan and his Sabre rattling against the Soviet Union, but this was something we'd spent the better part of a day discussing.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2024
  9. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    I looked him up and he doesn't even have his own Wiki page. There's a section on Princess Anne's Wiki page, and he was given a medal or something, but not much. I mean, he saved the Princess!

    He was a pretty scary lunatic.

    One of my faves, actually.

    How could they not know what they were getting? :rommie:

    I didn't see Butch & Sundance until sometime later, when it was on TV, but I actually saw The Sting in the theater near the end of its run, when it came to the little dollar theater in Columbian Square.

    Yeah. :D

    Sorry, I changed lanes without signalling. I was talking about Hawaiian Eye. The fact that Tina Cole had a recurring role made me think it probably wasn't filmed on location-- but then it occurred to me later that there's no reason she wasn't living in Hawaii at the time.

    And I'm in agreement with that. Also, in retrospect, in seems likely the use of the smaller weapons then prevented the use of larger weapons in the next ten to twenty years.

    That's a long video, but maybe I'll try to watch it in segments.

    Actually, I'm a little surprised. Kids usually try to relitigate history in favor of making themselves look superior. :rommie:
     
  10. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

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    @RJDiogenes
    One thing I brought up during the discussion was that the Soviet Union was planning to enter the war against Japan in October-November 1945 and had already begun shifting troops and materials to that effect.

    Once that happened, it would have been a race to see who could reach Tokyo first, the allies coming up from the south, or the Soviets from the north.

    There was a real possibility that we could have ended up with a divided Japan/Tokyo, much like Germany/Berlin.

    If there was a chance to end the war before the Soviet invasion, the allies would have taken it.
     
  11. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Hawaiian Eye - Wikipedia
     
  12. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Yes, this is also a very good point. It's hard to imagine how that would have affected the outcome of the Cold War.

    That answers that. I had no idea these shows were part of their own little universe. I don't think I've ever even heard of Bourbon Street Beat.
     
  13. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    I was watching a docu-show recently--and don't ask me what exactly it was--in which the narrative was putting forth that it wasn't the bombs that motivated Japan to surrender, it was the Soviets entering the Pacific War.
     
  14. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    The pressure was on them from all sides, as well as internally, but I'm more than a little skeptical of modern posers who think they know better than the guys who actually won the war. :rommie:
     
  15. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    50 Years Ago This Week


    March 24
    • The last of 120,000 Bangladesh prisoners of war who had been imprisoned in Pakistan were repatriated as a flight brought 206 Bengalis from Karachi in Pakistan to Dhaka in Pakistan.

    March 26
    • A group of peasant women in Chamoli district, Uttarakhand, India, surrounded individual trees to prevent loggers from felling them, giving rise to the Chipko movement and the practice of tree hugging as a means of environmental protection.
    • In a much-anticipated boxing bout, challenger Ken Norton faced defending WBA and WBC champion George Foreman at the Poliedro de Caracas in Venezuela, with broadcast of the fight seen worldwide on closed-circuit television to paid customers. Norton, who had a record of 30 wins and 2 losses, went up against Foreman, who was unbeaten after 39 professional bouts. The fight itself was anticlimactic, with Norton being knocked down three times in the second round before referee Jimmy Rondeau called the fight and awarded Foreman a win by technical knockout (TKO).

    March 27
    • The Los Angeles district attorney dismisses a complaint filed against John Lennon by the waitress of the Troubadour club.

    March 29
    • At 20:47 UTC, the Mariner 10 space probe, launched from the U.S. on November 9, made the closest approach to the planet Mercury up to that time by an Earth spacecraft, coming within 437 miles (703 km) of the surface.
    • The Terracotta Army of Qin Shi Huang was discovered at Xi'an, China.
    • The United Kingdom restored the speed limit on its network of M-designated motorways to 70 miles per hour (110 km/h), after having reduced the maximum speed to 50 miles per hour (80 km/h) on December 8 because of the worldwide fuel shortage.
    • A U.S. federal grand jury in Cleveland indicted eight members of the Ohio National Guard on civil rights violations for the May 4, 1970, shooting of 13 students at Kent State University, four of whom died of their wounds. Five of the defendants were charged with felonies. The indictments would all be dismissed on November 8 on a finding that the prosecution had failed to produce sufficient evidence to support charges.
    • The Volkswagen Golf was launched in West Germany as a modern front-wheel drive hatchback with a goal of replace the iconic Volkswagen Beetle, holder of the world record for the car with the most units produced.

    March 30
    • The 2-hour pilot for the proposed Little House on the Prairie television series was broadcast on NBC after NBC executive Ed Friendly purchased the exclusive rights to adaptations of the series of eight "Little House" children's novels written by Laura Ingalls Wilder between 1932 and 1943. Actor Michael Landon starred in and directed the film that was part of NBC's Saturday Night at the Movies feature, while Melissa Gilbert narrated and portrayed Laura Ingalls. The pilot was the third highest-rated TV broadcast of the week of March 25 to 31 in the U.S., and would debut as a weekly TV series on September 11.


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Americans," Byron MacGregor (12 weeks; mistakenly listed a couple of weeks back)
    • "Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)," The Rolling Stones (11 weeks)
    • "I Like to Live the Love," B.B. King (16 weeks)
    • "I Love," Tom T. Hall (16 weeks)
    • "Let Me Be There," Olivia Newton-John (19 weeks)
    • "You're Sixteen," Ringo Starr (15 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "La Grange," ZZ Top

    (#41 US)

    "One Hell of a Woman," Mac Davis

    (#11 US; #20 AC)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • Kung Fu, "The Cenotaph (Part 1)"

    _______

    Timeline entries are quoted from the Wiki page for the month and Mark Lewisohn's The Beatles Day by Day, with minor editing as needed.

    _______

    Revisionist historians, at least.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2024
  16. Nerys Myk

    Nerys Myk A Spock and a smile Premium Member

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    I don't think the study of history works in quite the way you think it does.
     
  17. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Cool. I didn't realize the phrase had a literal origin. :rommie:

    Interesting how they specify "Earth" spacecraft....

    Now there's a work of incredible artistry.

    "Everybody loves it. Let's replace it." :rommie:

    I don't think I ever knew the name of this one. It used to be kind of a staple on WBCN, but it's more or less background music.

    Meh. Mac Davis had a couple of good singles, but this isn't one of them.

    Indeed.
     
  18. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Now that you mention it... :shifty:

    I wasn't familiar with it, but from the picture I saw, it looked pretty impressive.

    Set off the ol' Squigometer, eh? Before the signature beards...this one was pretty familiar and has been on the album end of the shuffle for a while now.

    Now I thought this one was alright and was thinking of getting it.
     
  19. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

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    After the Troubadour Incident, John Lennon and Harry Nilsson decided to do something more positive than going out all night and spending their time engaging in wild benders. Since Harry's next album was due to RCA, it was decided that John would produce Harry's next album; discarding the songs that Harry had recorded the previous months and starting from scratch.
    They decided that they and the principal musicians involved should rent a beach house close to Santa Monica, and the tracks for the album could be worked on in the daytime before heading to the studio each evening to record.
    The house they chose to stay in had been built for film producer Louis B. Mayer and was currently owned by Peter Lawford. Lawford had often loaned the house to his brothers-in-law Robert and John F. Kennedy, and it was alledgedly where the President had some of his secret trysts with Marilyn Monroe. As Lennon and May Pang installed themselves in the master bedroom, he looked around and said, "So this is where they did it."
    Lennon took ownership of the property on March 22, and shortly thereafter, Keith Moon, Ringo Starr, Klaus Voorman and Harry Nilsson were living there.
    As they settled in, thoughts turned to what sort of album Harry should record. The initial idea of recording an album of songs by Allen Toussaint was rejected, as well as an album of rock and roll oldies; Lennon wary of revisiting an oldies project so soon after the collapse of the 'Rock 'N Roll' sessions with Producer Phil Spector still fresh in his mind.
    A compromise was struck - songs that had been earmarked for Lennon's 'Rock 'N Roll' album, "Save The Last Dance For Me", "Loop De Loop" and "Rock Around The Clock" would be recorded, as well as Bob Dylan's "Subterranean Homesick Blues" and Jimmy Cliff's "Many Rivers To Cross", favorites of John and Harry.
    They then went through the tapes of the songs Harry had demoed and recorded the previous months, looking for suitable candidates for inclusion. They settled on "All My Life", "Black Sails", "Don't Forget Me", "Down By The Sea", "The Flying Saucer Song" and "Old Forgotten Soldier", as the best of the songs Harry had written. A Harry fragment "Mucho Mungo" was combined with a Lennon fragment "Mt. Elga" to create the medley "Mucho Mungo/Mt. Elga".
    Recording on the album provisionally titled "Strange P*ssies" was set to begin March 28 at the Record Plant in Hollywood on March 28, the day after Lennon's final hearing for the Troubadour incident.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2024
  20. DarrenTR1970

    DarrenTR1970 Commodore Commodore

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    The "Shack outside La Grange" is the Chicken Ranch. The brothel that was the inspiration for the Broadway play and the Burt Reynolds/Dolly Parton movie "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas". The movie is probably best remembered today for the song "I Will Always Love You" written by Dolly especially for the movie and later covered by Whitney Houston for the movie "The Bodyguard".
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2024