The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    This song represents one of those quaint little 1960's music industry habits of "cloning" a previous hit. In this case it's the Drifters' hit, "Under the Boardwalk."
    In all the stuff I've read about the Beatles I've never read anything that made it clear exactly how this happened. I would love to know.
    God, this song brings back memories. Eddie Kendricks had one of the best falsettos of all time. He was featured a lot more prominently in the days when the group was singing mostly Smokey Robinson songs, and gave them a decidedly softer sound than they had after David Ruffin left.
    Really? I never liked the song either.
    Great song by a truly great band.
    I never was a big 5th Dimension fan, but I just loved Marilyn McCoo. She had one of my all time favorite female voices and was also a world class beauty. I used to look at her husband, Billy Davis, who was a nice enough looking guy with a good voice, and jealously mutter, "how the hell did he get her?" :lol:
    Marvin Gaye composition. You can easily hear him crooning it.
     
  2. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Happy Birthday! [​IMG]

    This is nice. I don't think I've ever heard it before.

    Nice sound, although the song is kind of mediocre.

    Meh.

    Ah, the classic ode to clinical depression. :rommie:

    Another Laura Nyro classic. Who else could make me love a song about a plea for marriage? :rommie: And of course the 5th Dimension's rendition is lovely.

    Better than a Top 40 classic. :D
     
  3. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50th Anniversary Viewing

    _______

    Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In
    Season 3, episode 1
    Originally aired September 15, 1969
    Looks like Judy's gone brunette this season.

    A circus-themed musical number from early in the episode:


    Alan Sues starts a new recurring skit as Uncle Al:


    Peter Sellers mentions his new picture, The Magic Christian, which is coming soon in the UK and a little later in the US. He doesn't mention that Ringo is his co-star. He also does a second Tyrone and a second German Soldier. There's a clip of him doing the second German Soldier on YouTube, but it doesn't appear to be from this episode.

    Dan and Dick plug Debbie Reynolds's new show (this season only, Tuesday at 8:00 on NBC), and riff on the fact that she was a former Miss Burbank. Debbie mentions "the children," but not by name. Carrie would have been 12 going on 13 at the time.

    The news segment intro is Moon/astronaut-themed. During Dick's monologue, Flip Wilson sits in the background making reaction noises. I hadn't noticed while I was watching, but I think they may have done away with the obvious Johnny Carson spoofery.

    There's one cocktail party segment at the halfway point, which includes a gag referencing True Grit.

    Another new segment, One-Liners, has a marriage theme this week:

    Note the fly on Goldie's face.

    The Fickle Finger of Fate goes to the Pentagon:


    There were some Joe Namath references in one sketch; a quick M:I gag with Henry Gibson as Phelps getting his tape on a construction girder, which he's blown off of when it explodes; and a swipe at Hee Haw--which started in '69--being a Laugh-In knockoff.

    _______

    TGs4e1.jpg
    "Mission Improbable" (Part 1)
    Originally aired September 18, 1969
    A new production touch: they're now showing the episode title onscreen when they come back from the commercial break after the opening credits. The way that the writing credit appears below at the same time reminds me of Love, American Style (premiering soon this season).

    Ann faces some '60s-style casual workplace sexual harassment in the teaser, but her boss, Mr. Schneider (Lou Jacobi), comes to her rescue before recruiting her for the spying job. This involves taking a job for Schneider's chief competitor--who's supposedly been spying on him and stealing his designs--as a sewing machine operator, which Ann has to crash-train for while Schneider and Donald bicker in the background.

    For the purpose of her assignment, Ann assumes the identity of "Ina Albert":
    TGmisc17.jpg
    After seeing what she did as a mousy type on My Favorite Martian, I was hoping we'd get some colorful character acting from Thomas here, but she pretty much acts like Ann trying not very successfully to act like somebody else.

    "Ina" finds that her new boss, Mr. Taylor (Avery Schreiber), isn't what she expected, generally coming off as a very nice guy. The episode ends with Taylor and his assistant noticing Ina using her new gadget, a Schneider-issue banana camera:
    TGmisc18.jpg

    "Oh, Donald" count: 2

    _______

    Ironside
    "Alias Mr. Braithwaite"
    Originally aired September 18, 1969
    The old woman of interest here is Mark's Aunt Ruby (Beah Richards). Baker (Joseph Campanella) and Stark (Phillip Pine) pull a scam similar to one I recall from a Dragnet episode, pretending to be a bank official named Bishop and an FBI agent to get her to withdraw her account in cash, then offering to put it back in themselves after hours. Bunco section even gets mentioned a few times.

    Ed and Eve go to a resort town where Baker is spending his ill-gotten gains under the alias of "Mr. Braithwaite". Ed pretending to be a boisterous tourist named Bixby is a bit cringey. It turns out that Ed based their characters on a couple that he knows when the real Bixby later turns up, but that angle doesn't go anywhere.

    Braithwaite's con against Fake Bixby involves having Ed's wallet lifted, then returning it himself to gain their confidence so he can pull them into a phony horse betting operation. But a female accomplice recognizes Ed, blowing his cover to Stark. Ed gets blackjacked by Stark (at least he didn't use TV Fu) as part of a new con in which Braithwaite pretends to have gotten robbed of the city of San Francisco's sting money. Ironside quickly figures out what the new game is and poses as a local police chief investigating the robbery, making Baker antsy enough about the heat being on him to try to leave the country in his Bishop disguise, which involves some aging makeup. He's taken out of line at the airport for a supposedly routine check and ushered into a room with Aunt Ruby, who's able to identify him.

    At one point Braithwaite and "Mrs. Bixby" are dancing to a cheesy muzak version of "It's Not Unusual"...from what they did with it, it took me a bit to place the song.

    This one was kind of interesting. Sort of like a longer Dragnet episode with more complications in the operation and no Friday narration.

    _______

    Adam-12
    "Log 15: Exactly One Hundred Yards"
    Originally aired September 20, 1969
    OK...apparently something glitchy happened in my recording of this episode back in July 2017. Right after the opening credits for Adam-12 on Cozi started, it somehow switched to Days of Our Lives on a local NBC affiliate! So I shan't be reviewing this episode at this time.

    Next week's episode, which aired immediately afterwards on Cozi...still Days of Our Lives.

    My recording of the third episode of the season looks OK. So I guess we'll be catching up with Reed and Malloy in a couple of weeks. And I'll have to watch for whenever Cozi gets back to the beginning of Season 2 in their current airings...which will be a while, as they're currently in the middle of Season 2! They must have gotten back to those episodes several times in the last couple of years, had I only known.

    _______

    This one's lined up to be posted next week, but I had noticed that they seemed to be doing a string of hits that referenced each other..."Boardwalk" had, in turn, referenced "Up on the Roof".

    I've read volumes on them and don't totally understand the details, because finances...but then, neither did the Beatles. Basically they were in a huge financial mess at this point from having run their own business for the past couple of years since Brian Epstein died. They'd been pissing away money left and right, Allen Klein had been brought into the picture, and, IIRC, they found themselves in the position of needing to liquify their assets, and that meant selling Northern Songs.

    As Paul tells it (so definitely one-sided), years later when Northern Songs was up for grabs, he had the opportunity to buy it himself but wanted to work with Yoko. She stalled and Michael Jackson bought it.

    Well, it was at #1 for four weeks in the UK, immediately following the Beatles' first bona fide #1, "From Me to You"...and they had been beaten to the punch at that by another Pacemakers song, "How Do You Do It?". And the song was apparently well-recognized enough over there that it was worked into the Beatles sketch that begins at 7:15 here:

    Not yet...song's still gotta climb.

    Hasn't made much of an impression on me yet, but I'm happy to see "Ruby, Don't Take Your Love to Town" go...lord, was I getting sick of that one.

    Couldn't find an official audio clip for it either, but I've heard it on Sirius.

    Ah, didn't know that...I'll have to listen for it.

    This is the part where I remind everybody that for 50th anniversary business, I cover all songs that made the Top 20...even ones that I wouldn't touch in a million years.

    It's a pleasant song and I enjoyed it long before I learned that it was my birthday song...but it hasn't got the cool factor of surrounding #1's "Suspicious Minds" and "Come Together" / "Something".

    Showing my true age, I first knew her as the co-host of Solid Gold in the early '80s.

    What, no love for the Brady Bunch theme?

    Now as you might have guessed from my having included it in the list, I was planning to include TBB in 50th anniversary viewing this year, based on how it had been available for streaming on Me's site for ages...and guess what? Checked just last night and it's not there anymore! Looks like they just started Season 5 in their Sunday Brady Brunch airings, so the first season should be coming around again soonish...but then I'll have to start it well into the season and play catch-up with earlier episodes later.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2019
  4. Nerys Myk

    Nerys Myk Tomorrow Never Knows Premium Member

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    Isn't acting Ann's job? I guess that's why she never hit the big time. ;)
     
  5. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Yep, and she makes a point of underscoring that fact.
     
  6. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Ah, my favorite season.

    Not one of my favorite Laugh-In tropes. :rommie:

    There ain't no flies on Goldie!

    Sounds more like That Girl From UNCLE.

    Ah, the old banana camera trick!

    Aunt Ruby wasn't posing as somebody? She must have felt left out. :rommie:

    That's weird. I assume the channel lineup didn't change. Is Cozi a sub-channel of the local NBC affiliate?

    Oops. * Snuffs out candles. *

    I can dig it. They played that one way too much on Oldies radio back in the 80s.

    Noted. :rommie:

    No love, but some measure of amusement.

    Acting, yes. Improve, no. :rommie:
     
  7. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    50th Anniversary Album Spotlight

    The Soft Parade
    The Doors
    Released July 18, 1969
    Chart debut: Aug. 9, 1969
    Chart peak: #6, Aug. 23, 1969

    With its brazen horn intro, "Tell All the People" (charted June 14, 1969; #57 US) sets the tone for the album. This Krieger-written number was the reason for the Doors differentiating the writing credits for the first time.

    Whereas the album's first of three lead singles, "Touch Me," served as listeners' introduction to the Doors' "new sound":

    (Charted Dec. 28, 1968; #3 US)
    Taken on its own merits, it's a very enjoyable, memorable hit single. But it's also a startling departure from the sound and style that the Doors had been known for up to this point. And as the album's best-known song by far, it bears the weight of epitomizing this misstep in the Doors' musical development.

    "Shaman's Blues," on the other hand, is pure Jim in both subject matter and style, and would have fit in on either a preceding or following album. Being a much stronger song than the oddball "Runnin' Blue," it just might have done better as a single .


    "Do It," co-credited to Morrison and Krieger, carries over a lot of the tone of "Tell All the People," coming off as embarrassingly pretentious in its declarative nature.

    The first side end's with Morrison's "Easy Ride". An upbeat, insubstantial ditty that served as the B-side of "Tell All the People," it sounds like it could have been a throwaway from one of the earlier Doors albums.

    Side two opens with another of the stronger and better-known Morrison tracks on the album, "Wild Child":

    This was also the B-side of "Touch Me".

    The oddball nature of Krieger's "Runnin' Blue" (charted Sept. 6, 1969; #64 US) has been discussed recently. It was the only single from the album released after the album.

    That he had something like "Wishful Sinful" in him during these sessions saves Krieger somewhat in my eyes. It reminds me of some of the gentler numbers on earlier albums like "The Crystal Ship" and "Yes, the River Knows".

    (Charted Mar. 29, 1969; #44 US)

    The album closes with its title track, which is similar to the final numbers on the Doors' first two albums in that it's a longer piece (8:36) consisting of multiple, distinct segments. Unlike "The End" and "When the Music's Over," which originated in the Doors' live performances as frameworks for rotating poetry segments, it was written as a complete work specifically for the album.

    It's not half the song that either of its aforementioned predecessors was, but this idiosyncratic mini-epic does a good deal to salvage the album for me.


    Altogether a decent listen, but definitely weaker track-for-track than preceding efforts by the band. It's the sort of album that I pretty much only listened to as part of a chronological Doors listen-through.


    Next up: Green River, Creedence Clearwater Revival

    _______

    Not much to my taste either, but the clip was available.

    They definitely couldn't have used that!

    I have no idea offhand. I want to say that I've seen commercials for the local CW affiliate on Cozi, but I may be thinking of another retro channel.

    When The Old Mixer is the size of a mini-watermelon, then the week will be nigh. That's assuming that I've read the chart right in that "the size of a pumpkin" seems to be one week overdue. And assuming that I wasn't. Mom did used to call me pumpkin....
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2019
  8. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    I love The Doors! Well, mostly Jim Morrison!!

    I'm surprised the lyric wasn't changed. Jim wasn't shy about asking for changes.

    Classic, though, and I do kinda like it.

    :bolian:

    I know, but it would have been funny. :rommie:

    You could hold out for Halloween.
     
  9. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Songwriting dynamics in the band may have been different...like if the other two liked the lyric.

    That falls during Mini-Watermelon Week.
     
  10. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Nice. Short, but sweet.

    You weren't born on Halloween, were you? You know how Alexander said, "If I were not Alexander, I would be Diogenes?" Well, if I weren't born on May 1st, I'd want to be born on Halloween. :rommie:
     
  11. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    No, no, Mini-Watermelon Week is the week before. I was born on Pumpkin Week. If I'm interpreting the site correctly.

    My birthday is also Election Day when it falls on a Tuesday.

    Looks like I will be able to cover the first episode of The Brady Bunch, as Me is airing a mixed batch of episodes out of sequence this Sunday in commemoration of the 50th anniversary.
     
  12. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Aw, a near miss. :(
     
  13. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    ...and what a sound it was. Easily in the top 5 Doors tracks, and from this group, that's saying something.


    Anything other than a "misstep." This track--like others on the LP--was an alert to the versatility of the Doors to seamlessly add new sounds to their songs, not sounding like he latest "we're a rock band experimenting" album, but a natural progression of writing exactly what a song needs, that justifying the changes to come, particularly on 1971's L.A. Woman.
     
  14. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    55 Years Ago This Week


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "C'mon and Swim," Bobby Freeman (12 weeks)
    • "If I Fell," The Beatles (9 weeks)
    • "It's All Over Now," The Rolling Stones (10 weeks)
    • "Maybe I Know," Lesley Gore (10 weeks)
    • "Under the Boardwalk," The Drifters (14 weeks)
    • "You Never Can Tell," Chuck Berry (9 weeks)

    Recent and new on the chart:

    "Baby Don't You Do It," Marvin Gaye

    (Sept. 19; #27 US; #14 R&B)

    "I've Got Sand in My Shoes," The Drifters

    (Sept. 26; #33 US; #21 R&B)

    "I Don't Want to See You Again," Peter & Gordon

    (#16 US; #9 AC; written by John Lennon & Paul McCartney--really Paul)

    "Everybody Knows (I Still Love You)," The Dave Clark Five

    (#15 US; #37 UK)

    "Baby Love," The Supremes

    (#1 US the weeks of Oct. 31 through Nov. 21, 1964; #1 R&B; #1 UK; #324 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time)

    Total Beatles songs on the chart: 3


    And new on the boob tube:
    • The Ed Sullivan Show, Season 17, episode 1, featuring The Beach Boys, Robert Goulet, Topo Gigio, Vonda Kay Van Dyke & Curley, Alan King, and Leslie Uggams
    • 12 O'Clock High, "The Men and the Boys"

    _______

    For my money, Morrison Hotel is much better at moving the Doors' sound forward while staying true to the band's identity as established on earlier albums. (Coming Next Year to an Album Spotlight Near Us!)
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2019
    TREK_GOD_1 likes this.
  15. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Well, this is better Marvin than the last Marvin.

    Definitely sounds like The Drifters, but not very memorable.

    Same for Peter and Gordon.

    I'm sensing a pattern here.

    Ah, Diana Ross breaks the pattern with a classic. :adore:
     
  16. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    50 Years Ago This Week



    The Old Mixer is the size of a honeydew melon...and he's getting in position!


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "The Nitty Gritty," Gladys Knight & The Pips (11 weeks)
    • "Put a Little Love in Your Heart," Jackie DeShannon (14 weeks)
    • "Sweet Caroline," Neil Diamond (14 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Delta Lady," Joe Cocker

    (#69 US; #10 UK)

    "Suite: Judy Blue Eyes," Crosby, Stills & Nash
    (#21 US; #418 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time)

    "Ball of Fire," Tommy James & The Shondells

    (#19 US)

    "Cherry Hill Park," Billy Joe Royal

    (#15 US)

    "Smile a Little Smile for Me," The Flying Machine

    (#5 US; #6 AC)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • Mission: Impossible, "The Code" (Season 4 premiere, starring Leonard Nimoy as Paris)
    • Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, Season 3, episode 3
    • That Girl, "My Part Belongs to Daddy"
    • Ironside, "Poole's Paradise"
    • Get Smart, "Ironhand"
    • The Brady Bunch, "Dear Libby" (to be covered at a later date)
    • Hogan's Heroes, "The Well"
    • Adam-12, "Log 52: Good Cop – Handle with Care" (I've got this one, really!)

    _______

    A fair assessment.

    As touched upon last week, the Drifters being particularly derivative of their classic prior hit.

    So...not Fab enough?

    This one has a nice, distinct sound for the DC5, but so did their last hit, "Because," and that one was much stronger / more memorable.

    What, no credit for Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson?

    _______

    In other news, the Super Deluxe 50th Anniversary Edition of Abbey Road dropped this morning!

    Indeed.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2019
  17. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I wasn't just referring to the lyrics. Sand in My Shoes was a structural clone of Boardwalk right down to the melody, to the point that if Boardwalk had had a different publisher, they would have had a slam dunk copyright infringement claim.

    Here's Boardwalk. Shoes is practically the same song.

    I think this song is a structural clone of Marvin's previous hit, Ain't That Peculiar., although not quite as close as Shoes is to Boardwalk.
     
  18. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Oh, I got that part. Just noting the larger link between the three songs.

    Except that "Ain't That Peculiar" isn't his previous hit...it won't be coming our way for another year in 55th Anniversaryland! And it'll be worth the wait--excellent song.
     
  19. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Ah, the impatience of young melons.

    Enjoyable, of course, because Joe Cocker has the mutant ability to make you think he's enjoyable.

    A beautiful classic.

    Pleasant enough, but not comparable to their biggies.

    I like this song. It's pleasant and very nostalgic.

    Same for this one.

    Yeah, a lot.

    If it was, they would have done it themselves. :rommie:

    A big hand for Florence, Mary, and the band-- but it's all about Diana and that amazing voice of hers.
     
  20. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    55th Anniversary Viewing

    12 O'Clock High
    "Follow the Leader"
    Originally aired September 25, 1964
    Our featured guest bombardier, Lt. Mellon (Andrew Prine), is pretty upset when he's ordered to continue with a bombing run after his navigator buddy is critically wounded; and moreso when said buddy dies before the bombers gets home. But having noted Mellon's accuracy even when he's under such pressure, Savage devises a tactic of having every bombardier drop on him--that is, drop where and when he drops rather than doing their own targeting.

    This episode is the first appearance of Barney Phillips in his series-wide recurring role as Doc Kaiser, who grounds Savage over inflamed eardrums that are threatening to burst the next time he goes up to 20,000 feet. Lt. Cobb, who'll be commanding the next mission, questions Savage's plan because of how bad Mellon is taking the last one. And indeed, before takeoff Mellon has the customary audio flashbacks to the previous mission to indicate his trauma.

    Sticking with Savage's perspective, we don't go along on the next mission. Savage learns when the bombers get back that all of the bombs fell short, as Mellon seems to have dropped his bombs prematurely. Before he has a chance to examine the photos, Savage further learns from General Crowe of a complaint from the Dutch Embassy about the school that was hit. Mellon can't explain why he missed, and Savage insists that it must have been due to damage or an equipment malfunction. Savage also publicly stands up for Mellon and the mission leaders--one of whom is Lt. Bishop, Paul Carr's first of three roles on the show--when Crowe wants to relieve them all. This episode also features Judy Carne in her first of three roles, this time as Jill, Mellon's girlfriend in Archbury, whom he dumps his guilt and performance issues on.

    By the beginning of Act IV, Savage has learned that flak hit a switch, resulting in a short circuit that caused Mellon's bombs to dump ten seconds early...but Mellon still doesn't want the responsibility of targeting for the group on the next mission. Savage leads it despite Kaiser feeling that his eardrums aren't ready yet. Mellon being uncommunicative at the beginning of the run causes some initial tension, following which he's hit by some fire from projected stock footage of a Focke-Wulf, but he still manages to hit the target for the entire group before succumbing to his injury.

    In the Epilog, Savage informs the hospitalized Mellon that more than 70% of the bombs hit within a thousand-foot circle.
    Mellon humbly doesn't correct him. Savage then relates how, 15 years earlier, he'd had a similar incident involving a crash in which his crew was killed, but Crowe had helped him to get through it.

    This one has some "early installment" touches in it, most notably Stovall wearing his glasses full time. I though maybe this was the same one in which he mentions being a grandfather, but if it was, that was cut from the version that I watched this time around.

    _______

    :lol:

    Recently did an album review that covered this one, so nothing to add at this point.

    Alas, the Shondells' biggies are behind them now, and they're on a short downswing before they fade into the mists of chart history.

    A very evocative oldies radio staple.

    A pleasant, sign-o-the-timesy one-hitter.

    Touche.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2019