The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    There's a good one.

    Meh.

    I like this one a lot.

    A weird classic. :rommie:

    The generic TV news anchor accent. :rommie:

    They should really have spun that off into a series.

    That should be interesting.....

    Eh? What?
     
  2. Mrs. Silvercrest

    Mrs. Silvercrest Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Any I Love Lucy or MASH fans?
     
  3. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50 Years Ago This Week


    AbbeyRoad.jpg
    This page includes some of the alternate shots that weren't used, including a couple of Paul not-so-iconically wearing his sandals.




    And The Old Mixer is the size of a head of cauliflower. Finally, something with a little substance.


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Bad Moon Rising," Creedence Clearwater Revival (14 weeks)
    • "Black Pearl," Sonny Charles & The Checkmates, Ltd. (13 weeks)
    • "I Turned You On," The Isley Brothers (10 weeks)
    • "Let Me," Paul Revere & The Raiders (12 weeks)
    • "Love Me Tonight," Tom Jones (11 weeks)
    • "Moody Woman," Jerry Butler (10 weeks)
    • "Too Busy Thinking About My Baby," Marvin Gaye (15 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Who Do You Love," Quicksilver Messenger Service
    (#91 US; not sure if this track corresponds with the single version)

    "Questions 67 and 68," Chicago
    (#71 US; will be edited and re-released in 1971, reaching #24 US)

    "When I Die," Motherlode

    (#18 US)

    "Easy to Be Hard," Three Dog Night

    (#4 US)

    "Hot Fun in the Summertime," Sly & The Family Stone

    (#2 US; #3 R&B; #247 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time)

    _______

    Not bad for one of Smokey's obscuros.

    Also an obscuro, but I think this one has a strong sound.

    This is decent...rounds things out a little.

    Another seminal British Invasion band makes the scene!

    Nope, that I'd recognize.

    I couldn't not include All in the Family given the opportunity. TV doesn't get much more sign-o-the-timesy.

    I haven't really watched Lucy since I was a kid. MASH, I'm afraid to say, I never got into. It was always a "Dad show" to me.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2019
  4. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Indeed, I'm a big fan of both. I watched M*A*S*H first run pretty much from the start, and Lucy was always there on Channel 56 when I was a kid-- she created some of the most iconic moments in comedy.

    Why did The Beatles cross the road? To get a better shot.

    Cauliflower Power!

    This is one that I associate more with the early 70s.

    Actually, this one too. I like them both, by the way.

    Meh.

    I absolutely love this. Three Dog Night and Hair.

    Classic.

    Oh, yeah.

    Really? That's fascinating. M*A*S*H also very sign-o-the-timesy as a Vietnam metaphor, but survived long beyond that. It's one of the few shows that not only improved over time, but improved every time a cast member was replaced.
     
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  5. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50th Anniversary Cinematic Special

    Midnight Cowboy
    Directed by John Schlesinger
    Starring Dustin Hoffman, Jon Voight, Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Brenda Vaccaro, and Barnard Hughes
    Premiered May 25, 1969 (New York); July 30, 1969 (Los Angeles)
    Winner of 1970 Academy Awards for Best Picture; Best Director; and Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium (Waldo Salt). Nominee for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Dustin Hoffman), Best Actor in a Leading Role (Jon Voight), Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Sylvia Miles), and Best Film Editing (Hugh A. Robertson).

    Jon Voight is one of those actors whom I know mainly as a name rather than for any of his specific roles. He was quite good in this as naïve would-be hustler Joe Buck (which sounds like it should be his porn name, not his actual name). Hoffman's Ratso Rizzo, OTOH, seemed a bit broad to me, though he definitely had his moments. I understand this scene is the source of a famous movie quote/moment:


    The flashbacks to Joe's early life initially struck me as an unnecessarily over-the-top touch, as I thought we got the gist of Joe's character and motivations from Voight's performance and the here-and-now dialogue. But as the film continued, I came to see how they went hand-in-hand with the fantasy/daydream sequences...like this one, which richly goes south on Ratso as Joe's hustling attempt falls through:


    I've been to New York many times and I've never seen people walking around somebody laying face-down on the sidewalk.

    This TV saw fit to mute quite a lot of language in this film, some as mild as "goddamned" and "ass". It sounded like there was some more understandable deletion of "fuck/fucking" and "shit" in there as well, and some sexual slurs.

    An unfortunate sign o' the times: Vietnam death counts being announced on Joe's radio. The omnipresent radio became a sort of character of its own, which made me feel really bad for Joe when he had to pawn it.

    I could see where this film might not be everybody's cup of tea...the squalid conditions in which Joe and Ratso live--squatting in a condemned apartment building--could be very depressing, though their ill fortunes were mined for dark comedy. Just as Joe's fortunes are starting to rise, however, Ratso's tragically fall.


    I found this scene quite touching for how Joe tries to buoy his dying friend's spirits with levity:


    Ratso's subsequent death on the bus is of course a classic movie moment:


    This film was responsible for belatedly launching Nilsson's "Everybody's Talkin'" into the Top Ten. Originally released in 1968, it didn't even crack the Hot 100 at the time. It will be doing so very soon in 50th Anniversaryland. I read that it was originally intended to be replaced by the newer composition "I Guess the Lord Must Be In New York City," but the director became attached to the temp track. The film version definitely seems to be edited differently than the single.

    We'll also be getting a Top Ten single by Ferrante & Teicher of the instrumental theme from the film in a couple of months.

    An IMDb trivia point claims that this film has the first recorded use of the term "scuzzy".

    Noteworthy cameo: During Joe's bus ride from Texas to NY, we see a little girl reading a copy of Wonder Woman #178 (Oct. 1968), which is the issue that starts WW's powerless Diana Prince phase.

    Would anybody know what b&w sci-fi film was playing in the theater where Joe gets his first (unpaying) John?

    Overall, I found this to be a pretty engaging watch, though at the same time, it didn't stick with me afterwards as much as some of the uber-classic films that I've covered as anniversary business.

    _______

    I thought you hadn't heard of these guys before the album spotlight came up.

    This one, understandable given its release/charting history. "Questions" probably slipped under most people's radar in '69, but Chicago will be busting into the Top 10 early in the new decade.

    The first of two major songs with "when I die" in the title this year...given the proximity to my date of birth, it makes me a little superstitious.

    Ah, that's right...I'd forgotten that this was another one from Hair.

    Uber-

    I suppose 50th anniversary retro could be a good time to give it a shot...won't be coming up for a few years, though.

    _______

    Speaking of 50th anniversary comics...from Action Comics #381, cover date Oct. 1969:
    Action381.jpg
    Holy redundancy, Mr. Kent!
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2019
  6. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    I knew pretty much nothing about this movie before now. It seems kind of warm and fuzzy for an edgy, counterculture, x-rated flick.

    "Double dumbass on you!"

    Apparently not. I found a discussion on criterionforum.org that did not resolve the question.

    I hadn't, but it turns out I remember this particular song.

    That might be interesting, because the early episodes were more slapstick and not as good as later seasons, to me.

    Nice warning label there, just in case he loses his super-memory.
     
  7. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Well, according to some loons, that was not Paul in the photo shoot, anyway. 'cause you know what they say happened to the "real" Paul by this time, and that business about the white Beetle on the cover... :guffaw:

    ...and in light of a certain, recent entertainment release, this horrifying attempt to launch a race war is still erroneously referred to by some in the media as the "end of the sixties," and/or "end of the love and peace decade." and/or "the end of the sixties hopefulness." (which is also said of the Rolling Stones' free concert at Altamont). That oft-repeated sentiment is so self-interested/myopic about a decade that started off with a near world war, assassinations for almost every year of the decade, hundreds of church bombings and/or burnings, government vs citizen conflicts spilling into the streets (including well known NSA/FBI/CIA targeting of black--and other groups), racial conflicts on every conceivable level, one of the most influential American political shifts in U.S. history (1964 and '68), riots triggered by innumerable causes, and it was never, ever a "peace and love" decade by any stretch of the imagination.

    I love how this band just slipped into the charts with no fanfare, with next to no one imagining how their songs would be so much a major staple of the next decade.

    This year was overflowing with one-of-a-kind songs. I cannot point to another track before--or after it (even from TDN, themselves) that kind of unique sound.

    That old expression, "and the hits keep on coming" was as true as it ever would be in 1969. Arguably the act's most memorable track (and considering their history, that's saying something). Eternally listenable.


    I remember watching it in the first few seasons (largely when Wayne Rogers was part of the cast as Trapper)--which in my opinion--are its best. Once Alda became too involved, and the already obvious Vietnam mirroring flat out turned into a weekly commentary series like any news program, that's when it lost all of its appeal.
     
  8. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    ...only if poverty, selling your body, and watching someone on the slow trip to death is warm and fuzzy. I've seen the film a few times, but its not the first movie one thinks of when wanting to revisit the movies of 1969.


    How dare you. ;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2019
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  9. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    Not sure I'd count is as "counterculture". But it does have heart.

    And that made me realize...shouldn't the label be facing the other way, upside-down to us? If it were, the redundancy of the editor's note would be a little more understandable. Also, I have to assume that the yellow glow is artistic license. I can't imagine that Gold Kryptonite lets you crack open the box a little without doing its thing.

    You'll have to be more specific about what you're referring to, and how it relates to the point you're trying to make.
    I can't imagine anyone who's coming from a counterculture-centric viewpoint calling it that without more qualifiers, because Woodstock hasn't happened yet. Altamont, yes, that's usually held up as the anti-Woodstock, and it neatly happened in the last month of the decade.
    Yet the other week, you seemed to be giving Manson credit for being worse than all of this.

    That sort of thing happens a lot if you're looking at the charts weekly. One example that springs to mind is that Kool & The Gang had a couple of early, sub-Top 40 charters in '69. Wasn't expecting to see them in the '60s.

    Interesting to see a dissenting opinion on this.
     
  10. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Well, the Peace & Love part was the opposition to all that-- you don't need a solution if there's no problem (well, unless you're a Millennial).

    Well, this was a time when deeper meanings and social relevance were part of the social landscape. The commentary may seem heavy-handed now, but the war was either still happening or just ended while the show was on the air. Also, the creativity of the show extended far beyond an op ed-- they did a lot of other cool stuff, like the dream episode and the episode that happened in real time.

    Well, similar to above, the warm and fuzzy part is these two guys striking up a genuine friendship in the midst of their poverty and illness (and their own shortcomings).

    Sorry about that. :rommie: But, in addition to the increasing quality of the writing, we had Harry Morgan replace McLean Stevenson, David Ogden Stiers replace Larry Linville, and Mike Farrell replace Wayne Rogers-- all improvements in both the actors and the characters they played.

    The label is in case Red Kryptonite makes him lose his memory. It's upside down in case the Red K flips his vision vertically. The yellow glow is a visual cue in case the Red K robs him of his ability to read altogether. Superman thinks of everything!
     
  11. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50th Anniversary Album Spotlight

    From Elvis in Memphis
    Elvis Presley
    Released June 1969
    Chart debut: June 14, 1969
    Chart peak: #13, July 19, 1969
    #190 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time
    I can definitely see this album having a place on the list, as it picks up where the Comeback Special left off in setting the direction for the revitalization of Elvis's music career. That said, much like the similarly titled Dusty Springfield album that I recently reviewed, it's just a good, solid album. There doesn't appear to be anything especially groundbreaking or trendsetting going on here outside of its significance to the King.

    The album opens strongly with, "Wearin' That Loved On Look," an upbeat song original to this album with some nice, funky twangy guitar:


    The next number is a bit awkward for me...a cover of the recent Jerry Butler hit "Only the Strong Survive". The arrangement follows the original a little too closely, such that I can't help mentally comparing it negatively to the Butler version.


    Following that is the slower-paced "I'll Hold You in My Heart (Till I Can Hold You in My Arms)," a cover of a 1947 country chart-topper by Eddy Arnold. Wiki describes the song as "a major country crooner standard". The arrangement sounds gospel-flavored to my ear.

    The morbid "Long Black Limousine" is another cover, though Wiki describes this as probably the best-known version, and credits it for turning "the original country tune into a soulful rhythm and blues song."

    "It Keeps Right On A-Hurtin'" was originally a hit for Johnny Tillotson in 1962 (#3 US, #4 Country, #6 R&B, #31 UK). Covering this is definitely more in Elvis's wheelhouse than Jerry Butler.

    The first side closes enjoyably with "I'm Movin' On," a driving blues/country fusion written and originally recorded by Hank Snow in 1950. According to Wiki, it and "I'll Hold You in My Heart" share the distinction of being two of three songs to spend 21 weeks at the top of the Country chart.

    I find side two's opener, "Power of My Love," particularly enjoyable. Elvis has a unique way of pulling off lines like "Every minute, every hour you'll be shaken / By the strength and mighty power of my love".

    What do Elvis and Leonard Nimoy have in common? Both covered "Gentle on My Mind," a multiple Grammy-winning composition best known for Glen Campbell's 1967 version, which performed fairly modestly on most charts (doing best on the Easy Listening chart, where it got into the top ten in 1968).

    Compare and contrast. :vulcan:

    The decent but relatively unremarkable "After Loving You" is a cover previously performed by multiple artists in the early '60s.

    "True Love Travels on a Gravel Road" is a Frazier-Owens composition that was originally recorded by Duane Dee in 1968. Given the timing, the evocation of "Stand By Your Man" would seem to have been deliberate. Anyway, it's solidly in Elvis's vocal wheelhouse.

    "Any Day Now," written by Burt Bacharach and Bob Hilliard, was particularly familiar to me, not from Elvis's recording or the original Chuck Jackson version from 1962, but from Ronnie Milsap's 1982 single, which topped the Country chart and made it to #14 on the Hot 100.

    Elvis's version was also used as the B-side of the album's lead single and best-known track...

    ..."In the Ghetto," which proved to be particularly controversial in these parts, so I'll just leave it at that.

    (Charted May 3, 1969; #3 US; #8 AC; #60 Country; #2 UK)


    Overall, a perfectly good listen, but kind of underwhelming in the immediate wake of Tommy.


    Next up: Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere, Neil Young w/ Crazy Horse

    _______

    Yeah, there's plenty of '60s to go 'round for everyone. We needn't be competitive about which part was the "real" '60s. It's conventional wisdom that it was a very tumultuous decade.

    So...you gonna watch it?

    Hmm...could Gold Kryptonite even affect him while he was under the influence of Red Kryptonite? This brings to mind a Silver Age story in which he was exposed to a half-Gold/half-Red Kryptonite meteor that gave him amnesia.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2019
  12. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    But "peace and love" was not dominating the American landscape. The single-minded side of the media and too many Baby Boomers (ever in self-aggrandizement mode) selfishly try to paint the decade (or the second half of it) as existing with that mindset, when the real story of 1960s America was one of absolute chaos, suffering, radicalism and violence, which unquestionably shaped the decade and the world going forward in leaps and bounds more than their corner of the social/media interests.

    I thought it was heavy handed in the 70s; once Alda, Gelbart, et al., decided to ramp up the political commentary (starting around the 1975-76 season), it was all downhill from there, with the humor not being as needling as it was early on, where the inspiration from the movie was clear. But "losing the plot" is what happens when a TV series based on the single concept of a film--goes on and on and on. It becomes the vision of others, rather than anything intended by the filmmakers.

    You might call it warm and fuzzy, but dread hovered over Midnight Cowboy from start to finish.

    Wayne Rogers was one of my favorite actors on the show; his Trapper John had his own, distinctive character as big as Alda's Hawkeye and was a solid counter for him, where Farrell was just a milquetoast personality. Then Stiers was just a stuffier substitution for Linville's Frank, the latter being effective with his narrow egomania.
     
  13. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Meaning the discussion surrounding the new Tarantino film.

    When using "end of the sixties," and/or "end of the love and peace decade." and/or "the end of the sixties hopefulness." in reference to the act/impact/effect of the Manson murders they speak in broad terms, not only going back two years to the Summer of Love (expected), but some conflate it with the early part of the decade, with what they perceive as being the equivalent of The Donna Reed Show meets My Three Sons--some perfect, idyllic example of peaceful Americana, which--again--skips over the realities of that decade.


    I was specifically comparing his being a single "force" (including his followers) mass murdering 30 (or more) people, as opposed to racist groups who did not kill nearly as many. That had nothing to do with assassinations, revolts, etc.

    Yeah, well, MASH had its good period--it just did not last long, from my experience watching the show.
     
  14. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Yeah, it seems an odd choice for the greatest album list. Like most albums, it was a collection of songs (as opposed to an opera or concept album), most of which were covers, and its only really memorable element was "In The Ghetto."

    Indeed, a lot happened. :rommie:

    Oh, I don't know. With a stack of books and DVDs awaiting my attention here, it seems unlikely, I guess.

    An excellent question. It may depend on the specific effect.

    I don't think I remember that one.

    That sound you hear is the world changing, more and more quickly than at any other time in human history, and it was "peace and love" that was the catalyst for that change. Compare and contrast with the current generation, who only know how to hate and only make things worse.

    I only knew the show. From my perspective, it changed from slapstick and sarcasm to adult drama and biting satire, which I saw as a change for the better.

    But, kind of like with the 60s above, it was the love and friendship in that world of dread that was the point.

    I found Trapper John to be basically redundant to Hawkeye, whereas BJ was an effective contrast and an additional point of view, while still being able to keep up with the shenanigans. Winchester was overall a more developed character who actually evolved throughout his run-- Frank was never more than a cardboard cutout.
     
  15. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    The tail end of Generation X through the Millennials believe they are the most loving, inclusive generation in history, and are never shy about telling everyone that.

    The sarcasm picked up where the film left off--that's why the early years felt like it still had some connection to the source, whereas later seasons were a stream of "Very Special Episodes" with minimal comedy stuck somewhere in-between.

    The "love and friendship" served as an example that it--from the film's POV--cannot win or sustain anyone. No matter how much they bonded, fate's dark doors continued to close on them until the end. Midnight Cowboy was one of those films that--in its own way--questioned the very idea of hope, and provided one negative answer after another.

    To me, Trapper was very much his own man; unlike Hawkeye, he had a stable home life "back in the world" (despite his philandering) so he was able to weather the chaos better than Hawkeye and act as the more "adult" of the two, with a more world-weary view. BJ in many cases came off like Hawkeye's 5-second counter in an conversation, then turned into his sounding board. He was far too low key.

    Frank only needed to serve that purpose--like some people in real life: he was a priss, adulterer and believed in the status of position and wealth. That's all he needed to be compared to the likes of Hawkeye and Trapper, who were part of the world, as opposed to looking at it with nose up in the air, and abusing others for not being a version of himself.
     
  16. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    TGs3e15.jpg
    "The Eye of the Beholder"
    Originally aired January 9, 1969
    The episode opens with Ann receiving the package, not finding Donald's call, and calling the shop that it's from to claim they made a mistake. She's in the middle of telling them how awful it is when Donald walks in and shows her the card.

    The object proves quite controversial, as everyone has their take on it. Jerry thinks it's a spittoon, and tries to clean his pipe on it. Ruth thinks it's supposed to be a cow. Jerry and Ruth's differing opinions over it lead to a marital spat.

    Mr. Brentano, the landlord, uses it to prop the bedroom window open while trying to fix Ann's radiator, making Ann think it had gone missing. He says that he knows a lot about art, but this sculpture looks like something broken. Ann later learns that he was offended at her arguing with him about it.

    This episode involves people being opinionating, so of course Mr. Marie had to be in it. He thinks it's dirty and describes it as a piece of pornography.


    Of course, Ann and her father come to an understanding about it by the end...
    To boldly go where no That Girl has gone before!

    "Oh, Donald" count: 5
    "Oh, Daddy" count: 2
    "Oh, Ruthie" count: 1
    "Oh, Mr. Brentano" count: 2
    "Oh, Mrs. Brentano" count: 2


    TGs3e16.jpg
    "Dark on Top of Everything Else"
    Originally aired January 16, 1969
    Ann asks Donald what he'd want to do on the weekend if he didn't spend it with her, and he takes the opportunity to decide to get some work done, prompting this week's title shot. Casey, I'd like to dedicate a song to Donald:


    Ann decides to go to Brewster unannounced only to find that her parents were leaving for a night in the city. Rather than accompany them, Ann decides to spend a melancholy night alone in the family home going through her old things.

    Mr. Marie: Why, when we were their age...
    Mrs. Marie: When we were their age we watched the zeppelins land in New Jersey. It's another world now.​

    Ann browses through her high school yearbook, The Brewster Rooster, which prompts her to make a couple of phone calls that both go awkwardly for different reasons.

    Unable to get ahold of Donald or to sleep, she hears a noise in the basement and investiages to find the wind is rattling a basement window. While she's trying to reach it by standing on a rocking chair, the basement door closes, locking her in. She then tries to reach the window to get out through it by standing on a fold-out bed, which folds up around her.

    Donald drops by to see her, finds Ann trapped in the bed, and rescues her. As they're having a tender moment while sitting on the bed, the Maries come home, and Mr. Marie is of course outraged by how he finds them.

    "Oh, Donald" count: 4
    "Oh, Daddy" count: 1

    _______

    Well, they're not all concept albums, and I'd classify a rock opera as a flavor of concept album. I have no trouble with From Elvis in Memphis having a spot for what it is.

    A noteworthily uninformative page, but https://dc.fandom.com/wiki/Superman_Vol_1_178 . I read a b&w reprint in the '70s.

    That's definitely seeing the glass as half-empty.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2019
  17. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    That's for sure, and I have no doubt that they'll continue to tell us as they go on dismantling the progress of the 20th century and undermining the foundations of Liberalism that make progress possible. :rommie:

    I can see that, but my experience begins and ends with the show. For me, it started out as a show that I watched because my Mother watched and ended as a show I didn't want to miss.

    That wasn't the impression I got and it's unfortunate if true.

    Apparently we each have our favorite second banana. :rommie:

    That's pretty much my point. He was a one-note joke. The only time he elicited any sympathy was when Hot Lips dumped him and the boys gave him some support for a change. Charles not only filled the snob role but he was a nuanced character who was affected by his experience in the war.

    Best outcome: It's an alien artifact, softening us up for invasion by turning everyone against each other. There are millions of them all over the world. Millions of them!

    That looks like it might be a record. :rommie:

    Oooh, prequel series: The Pulp Adventures of Mr. and Mrs. Marie.

    Like getting Friended on Facebook by old school friends who you haven't seen in 45 years, which has happened to me five times in the past month.

    I know, but it's all covers and only left us one memorable song. I just wonder what their criteria are.

    Judging from his word balloon on the cover, he's not only lost his memory but also a large part of his IQ. :rommie:
     
  18. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Any Day Now is one of a number of Bacharach compositions which, if sung correctly, meaning the melody and words, is nearly impossible to mess up. Fortunately, Elvis doesn't get cute and does the song pretty straight and it sounds pretty good even today. But NO ONE will replace Chuck Jackson's original. :)
    Why, whatever could you mean? :angel:
    I think it is a toss up as to who TV's first manic pixie was, Sally Field as Gidget or Marlo Thomas as That Girl. Regardless I liked both and had a sizable crush on's Marlo Thomas' Ann. I used to frequetnt a old diner back in the 80's where I used to see Marlo's dad, Danny, having business meetings.I was always hoping I'd see Marlo. Of course I never did.

    "You're gonna Lose That Girl". One of my favorite John songs. It is among many nearly perfectly written Beatles songs. It's textbook a-a-b-c-... structure is Brill Building worthy. I've always wondered how the band learned classic pop songwriting technique. I imagine George Martin likely gets a lion's share of the credit here.

    As great as they were, the Beatles were very "coachable", from what I've read. There is a story about John and Paul traveling across town to visit a guy who would teach them how to use B7 chords. Their songs are fairly littered with B7's. Anyway, never tire of hearing Your're Gonna Lose That Girl.
     
  19. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2002
    Location:
    Somewhere in Connecticut
    You may just have to watch it and find out for yourself....



    IIRC, there was an episode that had something like 13 "Oh, Donald"s alone.

    Elvis wasn't an artist who wrote his own material, and two or three of those seemed to be original to him performance-wise.

    IIRC, in the actual story it was getting knocked onto the electrical lines that restored his memory.

    George Martin played his role in shaping the songs when they got into the studio, but I've read volumes about the Beatles and I can't recall anything about him being involved in their songwriting. John and Paul were knocking out songs in their homes and hotel rooms.
     
  20. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Location:
    RJDiogenes of Boston
    I may. :rommie:

    I wonder how long all the "Oh, ____" would be if strung end to end.