The Classic/Retro Pop Culture Thread

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by The Old Mixer, Jan 11, 2016.

  1. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Looks like a piece. Or maybe it's just too weird to see him with hair.

    So was the murder an accident or something? Seems like his normal gig is just credit card theft.

    Actually, I was expecting a woman to be the killer when they found out about the purchase, since a woman's name would be on the cards.

    That's kind of a clever plot. He is the Fagin of Puppydom.

    I don't think they knew the difference. It's drugs!
     
  2. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    Dragnet 1968

    "The Pyramid Swindle"
    Originally aired November 30, 1967
    Monday, March 13 (1967): Friday and Gannon, working the day watch out of Frauds Division, Bunco Section, attend a sales seminar being held by Bonnie Bates (Virginia Gregg yet again), the widow of a man known to have been running a pyramid scheme. At the seminar, Friday prevents an elderly woman from plunking down her $200 without blowing his cover by confidentially giving her a false tip about a half-off special the next week. After presenting the evidence of a recording of a similar seminar that they bought there, the detectives get the OK from the City Attorney via their captain to bust Bates.

    The second half of the episode takes place in court. The lawyer for the defense tries to make it look like Friday and the department statistician don't know what they're talking about because they're not experts in the mathematics of probability, chance, and whatnot. When the defense attorney brings in just such an expert witness to testify that the scheme is theoretically feasible, the prosecuting attorney turns the tables by getting the witness to tell the jury the number of participants it would take for the scheme to work as advertised: 360 million...roughly 160 million more people than the entire population of the United States.

    Dragnet46.jpg


    "The Phony Police Racket"
    Originally aired December 7, 1967
    Thursday, November 15 (1966?): Friday and Gannon are working the day watch out of--you guessed it--Frauds Division, Bunco Section, when they're sent to talk to an irate tavern keeper (Eddra Gale) who know she's been conned, but thinks it's the police who conned her. The detectives gradually learn from her that the scheme involves selling local small business owners ads in the magazine of a fake police organization called NALE (National Association for Law Enforcement), with the incentive of getting a membership card that supposedly bestows special privileges with the police force. The business proprietor next door (Stuart Nisbet) thinks that the card has been working like a charm for him, because he's been tearing up traffic tickets without consequence (yet), as one of the fake officers told him he could.

    Another victim whom they talk to is able to provide the detectives with a copy of the NALE magazine, which carries the address of the printer, whom they find has been conned as well, having printed thousands of issues of the magazine that haven't been picked up so that "Sgt." Densmore could obtain the preview copies. Their next break comes from a traffic violator who's been brought to the station for tearing up his ticket in front of...Officer Jim Reed! Yes, it's Kent McCord...Friday calls him Reed, and we get his first name in the end credits, but this clearly presents continuity issues with Adam-12, since he'll be a rookie fresh out of the academy a year later (and here he comes off as an officer who's already been on the job for a while). Anyway, the violator, Mr. Emerson (Don Ross), has a meeting scheduled with Densmore to pay for another ad.

    Friday and Gannon arrange to be at the meeting, posing as fellow construction men. Friday expresses an interest to Densmore (G.D. Spradlin) in getting one of the cards, and Densmore goes through his sales pitch about NALE being a charity for widows and orphans. When the transaction is complete, Friday and Gannon drop cover and arrest him. He offers to take them to the top man, "Captain" Fremont, for a good word to the judge. Densmore takes them to a run-down house where Fremont (Ben Hammer) is running a room full of hustlers working the phones, all claiming to be the phony captain. The detectives pretend to be interested in working the job, and when Fremont hands them a script, they arrest him.

    Dragnet47.jpg
    Dragnet48.jpg

    _______

    They speculated that the victim must have caught him in the act and he silenced her.
     
  3. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    You may be confused about how pop music works. The Beatles "covered' the songs of artists they admired. The term "cover" refers to the act of one artist recording or performing the songs of other artists. If you check the writing credits of each of the Beatles' covers you'll note that the original songwriter is always given album credit as is the identity of the copyright holder. A rip off would be an artist recording or performing the songs of other artists without giving that artist credit and not getting permission. Simple, no?
    Always interesting to me when I get into an online debate, and the poster with whom I’m debating starts copy and pasting long swaths of material in order to make their point.

    And speaking of that, what is the point you’re attempting to make with this long quote?

    Are you trying to say that the Beatles believed the Beach Boys were the better band? If so, :lol:.

    Brian Wilson was a great writer and much admired by many of his peers. However, it is also true that he felt like he was in competition with Lennon/McCartney, which ironically, led him away from ripping off Chuck Berry tunes and trying to actually come up with something truly different. It's not unlikely that a large motivation for Pet Sounds was the Beatles.
    Yes, I'm Down, was Paul's attempt to write a Little Richard song, per Paul himself. All I Gotta Do, was John's attempt to write a Smokey Robinson tune. Hide Your Love Away, John also stated, was his attempt to write a Dylan song.

    Again, what's your point?
    They "invented" progressive rock. They were the first major mainstream rock band to experiment with new sounds, studio techniques, etc, which expanded the boundaries of what was defined as rock music.
    Please do continue. I'm enjoying this.

    No one said the Beatles invented creativity and innovation in rock and roll. That is a straw man argument you've created because it is much easier for you to argue than 'the Monkees are a better band, or just as good'. The Beatles were creative and innovators.
    As I've had to tell others in this forum, Boomers can't help it if their generation's birth happens to coincide with the birth of rock, thereby making Boomers' rock idols purely coincidentally, the architects of rock music. And might I reiterate, you think the frigging Monkees are some kind of great band. That alone blows a rather sizable hole in the credibility of your “taste”.
    I never said black artists "needed" white artists to popularize black music. What I said was that one of the benefits of having artists like the Beatles record their muisic was, in addition to the royalties, opening up those musicians to a new audience. The Bealtes ALWAYS talked freely about the artists who influenced them and the covers of those artist's songs. Also, they never released cover versions of songs that were currently on the charts or in recent release.

    The problem back then wasn't necessarily white artists covering black music, it was white DJ's refusing to play the originals of the tunes being covered. Your knee jerk and very superficial parroting of an often quoted assessment of the issue misses the real problem by a wide margin.

    Had white DJ's, who in some cases, were being paid by record companies, played Hank Ballard's original version of "The Twist" we might never have heard Chubby Checkers'. But on the other hand, maybe we would have heard Chubby's version which would have meant even more royalties for Hank on top of the royalties made by his original.

    You see, professional songwriters are in the business of selling songs. I wouldn't think it matters to whom they are sold, Pat Boone, Chubby Checker, who cares? Now, singer songwriters, are trying to also sell their versions of their songs. So back in the day, what black artists needed was not so much, white artists not recording their songs, but for white DJ's to also play the original records.

    Yes, I fanboy for the Beatles. But you stan the Monkees. You know they are like a bastard stepchild in the Beatles’ legacy? They were conceived as a knock off of not the actual Beatles, but a knock off of the Beatles as portrayed in A Hard Days Night.
    I don’t have to ask Quincy Jones about segregation of the charts in the 60’s, I remember. I listened to my little transistor radio incessantly, to pop and r&b stations. In those days those stations playlists always reflected their respective charts. I’m well aware that black stations played mostly black artists and white stations, mostly white artists.

    However, I’de be willing to bet that if you polled all Americans back in the mid 60’s about who their favorite individual artist or band in pop music was, the Beatles would have easily had the highest percentage.

    And you might not be aware, but the Beatles had a quite sizable number of fans in black communities across America. It was by no means a majority, but sizable nonetheless.
    My evidence is the fact that the Stones managed to continue as a record setting touring band for over 50 years. If it were actually true that they started to suck in 1968 and never recovered, I doubt they’d have been able to successfully continue on the road for as long as they did.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2019
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  4. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Translation: Please do not provide evidence of the Beatles not being some pure creative force, when history--and McCartney's own statements prove the Beatles most celebrated album would not exist if not for being heavily inspired by Pet Sounds.

    Please do not refer to the Beatles liberally apeing Dylan, or "Yesterday" showing clear signs of cloning from the Ray Charles version of Hoagy Carmichael’s “Georgia On My Mind" and Nat ‘King’ Cole’s "Answer Me My Love." It goes on and on in their catalogue, but shh! the Fab Four were the most original band in rock history....r-right?? No.

    Utterly false. Its genesis can be found in the 1950s, which saw rock stars break out of pure blues, jazz and rockabilly roots to start incorporating everything from the modified version folk to classical-rooted string and horn sections (numerous black artists were already taking this a natural artistic path, while a man like Buddy Holly--for one example--was moving in that direction shortly before he died) in a way that was once only considered the purview of artists outside of rock. That was already changing the sound of rock/pop music, opening the psychological door for acts and producers of the future to explore beyond genre limitations. To say the Beatles were the first in that regard is historically inaccurate in the extreme.

    Lets not even get into which early 1960s acts (including some of the British Invasion) were breaking that new ground both Stateside and abroad.

    .Yet your Beatles fanboy mind let this find its way into your post:

    "They "invented" progressive rock. They were the first major mainstream rock band to experiment with new sounds, studio techniques, etc,"

    Yeah that's another way of you reaching the same conclusion.

    One can exist in the same time as any artists without turning them into false idols. Many a Baby Boomer have a tendency to erect false idols without question (e.g.,George Reeves "was the best Superman ever!!", Elvis, et al.), or ever seeing the inherent flaw in such a mindset.

    That's another way of saying they needed white artists.

    Posted like someone not living on the other side of the tracks.

    Being a bystander is not being at the record companies who also played a part in those segregationist practices, which were shared by radio advertisers, civic groups interested in maintaining a "cultural" status quo by targeting art, etc. Jones is a wealth of information on the details of how and why some artists did not get the same exposure/access as white artists, which by any standard of research--must force the reevaluation of oft-vomited "history" of who and what were the true movers and shakers of that genre.

    Since part of my family is black I would know about that more that you, and from both family and community knowledge I'm aware of from one end of America to the other over the decades, and the Beatles were not as widely accepted in that community as you are suggesting. In fact, of the British invasion groups, The Rolling Stones and The Animals developed a far stronger fan base among American black listeners than the Beatles, not only due to what they were recording, but an acknowledged pedigree which was more than reverential to both the known and near-faceless blues and gospel artists which fueled those groups.

    That is not how evidence is gathered in defending a specific case/example. This was about their poor performance at the Rock n Roll Circus from November of 1968 and how that was not unusual considering their poor performance at the NME Pollwinners show earlier that year (May), and how disjointed/sloppy they would continue to be in live performances in the following year. As covered days ago, the band members have gone on record as being more than dissatisfied with the band's live status at the time. Months of drug and legal problems made it a minor miracle TSMR was even released in 1967, and the Spring/Summer '68 sessions for Beggars Banquet happened at all. Again, BB was the group's great return to the early, Jones-directed blues years, but there is no question that the Rolling Stones were scattered as a concert-ready act in the period in question.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2019
  5. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    I had much higher hopes for this title.

    Well, that's why she was trying to recruit more people. Duh.

    I remember that scene. :rommie:

    Well, my iPhone calendar tells me that November 15th actually fell on a Tuesday in 1966, so this could take place in 1973.

    That makes sense. It didn't sound like murder was his regular gig.

    Some refer to this as being "born at the right time." :rommie:
     
  6. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    55 Years Ago This Week

    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Ain't Nothing You Can Do," Bobby Bland (9 weeks)
    • "All My Loving," The Beatles (6 weeks)
    • "She Loves You," The Beatles (15 weeks)

    Recent and new on the chart:

    "Every Little Bit Hurts," Brenda Holloway

    (May 2; #13 US; #3 R&B)

    "Viva Las Vegas," Elvis Presley

    (#29 US; #17 UK; Coming May 20 to a theater near you!)

    "P.S. I Love You," The Beatles

    (B-side of "Love Me Do"; #10 US)

    "A World Without Love," Peter & Gordon

    (#1 US the week of June 27, 1964; #1 UK; written by John Lennon & Paul McCartney--really Paul)

    Total Beatles songs on the chart: 6. Historical note: This is the first week since January that the Beatles haven't occupied the top spot.

    And new on the boob tube--Ed's guests this week include Stevie Wonder performing last year's breakout hit, "Fingertips":

    And spotlighting what will be their first U.S. hit, "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying," ahead of its chart debut...Gerry & The Pacemakers!

    _______

    In fact, Rubber Soul is known to have inspired Pet Sounds:
    Wilson also reportedly had a very strong reaction to hearing "Strawberry Fields Forever," which with "Penny Lane" was the first material to be released from the Pepper sessions:
    And of course, you, I, and most people know and readily acknowledge that all artists have their influences, and nothing inspires creativity like competition. Did Pet Sounds inspire Pepper? Absolutely, and all the popular music that came after is the richer for it. Does anyone think that Pepper is a pale knockoff of Pet Sounds? They're both great albums (holding the top two spots in Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time), and each has its own distinctive character, because the Beatles and Beach Boys may have influenced each other, but each band retained its own distinctive sound and identity.

    All of which is a far cry from "Let's make a single that sounds as much like the latest Beatles single as possible"

    I don't suppose you were lurking here a while back when TREK_GOD refused to acknowledge the existence of Folk Rock as as a genre and insisted that Dylan plugging in and the Byrds weren't doing anything that the Kingston Trio and the Weavers hadn't already done?

    It's a novel tactic...attempting to elevate the Monkees by tearing down the Beatles. The problem with it is that even if we all subscribed to this alternative history in which the Beatles were absolutely worthless, there are still dozens if not hundreds of '60s musical acts better than the freakin' Monkees.

    I don't entirely understand the dynamics of pyramid schemes, but the idea as postulated in the episode was that really only the people who get in earliest, in the top few tiers of the pyramid, stand to make real money out of it. What I don't get is how it would ever be considered theoretically feasible as the expert witness testified. It seems that no matter how huge you managed to grow the pyramid, the increasingly vast number of people at the bottom would still just be paying up.

    Ah, I was tired and looking at the wrong T-day! I've resisted projecting the dates into the future beyond the year in the title of the season, but 1973 would make a lot more sense than 1962...not just because of Reed, but because Friday identified the car that Densmore was driving as being a 1967 model.

    Something occurred to me about the Fake Scripture in "The Big High"...in lieu of The Word of God, it sounds like the writers were channeling The Word of Bob! :D
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2019
  7. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    He's not making a simple "influence" argument. He's arguing a level of absolute originality while putting blinders on about swiping from the work of others. Additionally, you conveniently ignored this whopper:

    That is crediting one group with a monumental artistic movement in rock/pop with is patently false, no matter how much some want to con themselves with that never-never-land business.

    Whoops.

    I cite real history, not Wikipedia, as some around here commonly do. If you want to believe fairy tales, that is your business, but do not pass that off as real history, like the member you supporting. Then again, you choose to believe the Beatles were merely influenced by the work of others, and were beyond outright swipes. Laughable.
    Painful as it might be for a few, its a matter of easily-researched history. They were guilty of the practice, as other acts were. In a 1982 Playboy interview, McCartney said the following:

    "Oh, yeah. We were the biggest nickers in town. Plagiarists extraordinaires."

    No one--even McCartney himself--ever said that admission was with tongue in cheek, but please, keep fighting against the man's own words and deeds. There's similar interviews / research published over the decades, but I'm going to go ahead and say it will never be accessed by a couple of people.

    Enough with the lies. You--the obsessed Beatle fan--could not post a review of the Monkees' TV special without turning it into an opportunity to attack them by comparing the special to / trying to boost the Magical Mystery Tour TV special in the same breath. Do you believe no one can see what you were doing? The only tactic repeatedly attempted in this thread is yours, Old Mixer.

    Speaking of tactics, what was yours in posting disparaging things about The Who, a group with a body of work you are--admittedly--not that familiar with? That calls your ability to be objective about much into question unless you're going to.admit you have an agenda (and petty one at that, as it seems to only exist to target one board member)...but I doubt you will.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2019
  8. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    OK, I'm not getting dragged down into a back-and-forth on all of this, but I feel I need to clarify a subtlety that seems to have gotten lost...
    When I say that Head or 33 1/3 Revolutions per Monkee was worse than Magical Mystery Tour, that's not elevating MMT...that's saying that as bad as MMT was, these were even worse. That's using MMT as a measure of badness/unwatchability.

    Whoosh.
     
  9. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    I don't remember this. Nothing really leaps out (except the album cover).

    Yeah, I love this one. :rommie:

    Here's a classic.

    A subtly heartbreaking and disturbing classic.

    Way to fake out Squiggy.

    I don't really get it either, since it involves numbers, and I also don't really understand why it's illegal-- people should have the right to be stupid. Or take chances, however you want to look at it.

    And Adam-12 was still on the air, so it all fits. We have officially confirmed that Joe and Frank are unstuck in time. :D

    Well, he is a prophet for our times. :mallory:
     
  10. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50 Years Ago This Week


    And The Old Mixer is the size of a lemon.
    Second trimester--Woohoo! Let the squinting and grimacing commence!


    Selections from Billboard's Hot 100 for the week:

    Leaving the chart:
    • "Badge," Cream (5 weeks)
    • "Hot Smoke & Sasafrass," The Bubble Puppy (12 weeks)
    • "Memories," Elvis Presley (7 weeks)
    • "Mr. Sun, Mr. Moon," Paul Revere & The Raiders (12 weeks)
    • "Rock Me," Steppenwolf (10 weeks)
    • "Runaway Child, Running Wild," The Temptations (12 weeks)
    • "Time of the Season," The Zombies (13 weeks)
    • "Wishful Sinful," The Doors (6 weeks)

    New on the chart:

    "Black Pearl," Sonny Charles & The Checkmates, Ltd.

    (#13 US; #8 R&B)

    "Love Theme from Romeo and Juliet," Henry Mancini, His Orchestra & Chorus

    (#1 US the weeks of June 28 and July 5, 1969; #1 AC)

    "Get Back," The Beatles w/ Billy Preston

    (#1 US the weeks of May 24 through June 21, 1969; #1 UK; another entry at #10!)

    "Don't Let Me Down," The Beatles w/ Billy Preston

    (B-side of "Get Back"; #35 US)


    And new on the boob tube:
    • The Ed Sullivan Show, Season 21, episode 28, featuring Richie Havens, Brascia & Tybee, The Baja Marimba Band, Vikki Carr, Beverly Sills, and Joel Grey

    _______

    It's a little old-school for the period, but has a nice sound.

    Movie Elvis gets a bad rap...he's still got some "it" factor going.

    Notably, this was also the UK B-side of "Love Me Do," which was released there as the Beatles' first single in Oct. 1962.

    Notable here is that Peter Asher was pretty close to Paul in the day, as Paul was not only going steady with his sister Jane, but also living in the attic of the Asher family home! 50 years ago this week, Asher would have been involved in Apple. Today he hosts a show called "From Me to You" on Sirius XM's Beatles Channel.

    It Squiggy's got an issue with Stevie, that's his problem. :p

    I guess I'd agree on gambling in general...the pyramid scheme seems more like a con. Would it help you to disapprove of it if I noted that, as touched upon in the episode description, Bates delivered her seminar in the style of an evangelical sermon?

    Guess it makes sense, since even ignoring day/date sync, just the months are all over the place from episode to episode.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2019
  11. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    ..you did jump into the middle of it, but I will let that go, since you do not wish to continue going into it.

    The presidential candidates for 2020 could use you, what with your mastery of the spin job!
     
  12. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Good practice for all the TV reviews. :rommie:

    This is really nice.

    Very familiar, but, you know.....

    This is a good one.

    Also good, but generally relegated to the wee hours, as I recall.

    It's a really fun song.

    That's pretty funny. :rommie:

    Squiggy thinks Stevie saved it. :rommie:

    And yet Amway is legal.....

    I'm sure they did it deliberately, just to drive us mad.
     
  13. gblews

    gblews Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Henry Mancini wrote some of the most beautiful and interesting melodies ever recorded. He wrote "Moon River", "The Pink Panther", Peter Gunn, in addition to "Love Theme" and several others. The man was truly gifted.
    Peter Asher tells a story about when he and Paul lived together back then. He said that one day he needed a pair of clean socks so he went looking for a pair in Paul's room. He said that the only thing in the room that was an indication that someone famous lived there was Paul's bass case which had the Beatles' logo on it -- until he opened one of the chest of drawers. Instead of socks the drawer was filled with cash. :lol:
     
  14. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    _______

    50th Anniversary Viewing

    _______

    The Saint
    "The Man who Gambled with Life"
    Originally aired January 26, 1969 (UK); May 2, 1969 (US)
    Simon's enjoying a solo picnic in the countryside when he's approached by a mysterious young woman (Carlson) wearing the same shirt as him and accompanied by several men dressed in black formal wear. She engages in cryptic conversation that sounds partly like an offer, partly like a threat, and hands him a cage with a mouse in it named Mimi whose lifespan she says has been doubled. She also explains that if something happens to Simon, he won't be missed because he has no relatives and travels around so much. The halo is both mistimed and very off-center.

    Simon returns to his flat to find a coffin with a wax dummy of himself inside, and another young woman wearing his shirt who holds a gun on him that turns out to be loaded with blanks...both to underscore his mortality. This woman, Stella (Sofiano) is a little less creepy and more playful and flirtatious. She identifies herself as the sister of the other woman, Vanessa, and talks about how Simon's been "selected" because of his psychological profile. Simon makes an excuse to leave the room and slips out the window. When Stella finds that his car is gone, she drives off in her own...and Simon tails her to an airport where she meets up with Vanessa and boards a helicopter.

    When the ladies return home, we meet their wealthy father, Keith Longman (Evans), who's having his vitals monitored and is told that he could die of his heart condition anytime within the next six months. He discusses his plans with his daughters and makes it clear that he's determined and won't be held back by anyone, not even Stella, who disagrees with his choice to force Simon to help him. Longman's house has a room with high-tech consoles and computers and an underground dungeon with a gorilla in it, and he has several hired underlings whose uniform is a blue pullover with black collar and cuffs and black pants, making them look distractingly like blueshirts from Star Trek--there's even a thin diagonal stripe on the shirt that looks like a tricorder strap!

    Having bribed a man at the airport to track down the helicopter, Simon finds Longman's house in Cornwall and, accompanied by Mimi and with the help of some TV Fu, sneaks in and finds Longman's mancaves. The gorilla is now in what looks like (and indeed turns out to be) a suspended animation chamber. Longman finds Simon and treats him to the customary Bond villain routine of revealing his plan (Get used to it, Roger.), which involves using Simon as his first human suspended animation test subject. Simon tries to leave, but one of the blueshirts stuns him with a phaser knocks him out with gas, and Longman proceeds to thaw his gorilla.

    The gorilla doesn't make it, and when a couple of the guards go to retrieve Simon, who's been locked in a room with Stella, he overpowers them with more TV Fu and he and Stella proceed to escape. This includes her doing what appears to have been a just-off-camera chop or judo throw that causes a guard to fall into camera unconscious.
    They're caught by Vanessa and her "undertaker's men," but when she returns them to her father's lab, we find that Longman has suffered an attack and his blueshirts were forced to put him in the chamber, with the hope of being able to successfully revive him someday when his condition can be treated.

    This one felt somewhat like an Avengers episode with its idiosyncratic, larger-than-life antagonists. It also felt quite padded again...Simon didn't even really do anything to affect the outcome of the story, he just sort of waltzed through it. As guest heroines on the show go, Stella was rather enjoyable.

    _______

    Musically it seems kind of lightweight and undistinguished, but it's a Top 20 single, it has a sign-o-the-times message, and the group are Hoosiers, so I got it.

    Took 'em long enough to churn out a single, though...the film may have still been doing well in theaters at this point in those days, but it seems like a long time since it came up as 50th anniversary business...and that was going by American release date.

    Here we have the first material to be released from the Get Back sessions of a few months back. The Let It Be film and album won't be coming out for a full year. The version of "Get Back" on the album is from the same recording, but edited differently.

    There may be hope for Squiggy yet....

    Had to look that up, but from what I glanced over, they were around in the day, though I'm not sure how high-profile they would have been at that point. It's possible that the episode was specifically aimed at them...the evangelical sermon aspect seems too similar to be a coincidence.

    It does help sell the "true story" aspect of the series...like you're actually seeing cases that involved different policemen in different times and places, but fictionally channeled through our recurring characters.

    That is pretty funny! :lol:

    _______

    Dragnet 1968

    "The Trial Board"
    Originally aired December 14, 1967
    Tuesday, August 29 (1967): Friday and Gannon are working the day watch out of Robbery Division when Capt. Howe (Art Gilmore) informs Friday that a uniformed officer has requested that the sergeant represent him before a trial board. Friday visits the officer, Phil Waverly (Steve Carlson), who's been accused of accepting a bribe from a bookie and not identifying himself as a police officer when vice officers who say that they witnessed him taking the bribe arrested the bookie in his presence. Waverly tells Friday how the bookie was an old Vietnam buddy and that he'd been offered a bribe but refused to accept it. Waverly doesn't know Friday personally, but chose him based on his reputation for going to the limit for what's right.

    Friday enlists Gannon's aide in his investigation. They visit the bookie, Ted Clover (Peter Duryea), who sticks to his testimony that Waverly took his "loan," and seems pretty cavalier about it all.

    The second half of the episode centers around the titular convening. Clover is reluctantly made to hand over a book (which he conveniently brought with him) in which he says he recorded the transaction, but it's in code. Friday enlists the help of Sgt. Hugh Binyon (Alfred Shelly), a Vice Department expert in bookmakers and their operations, to decipher the code. Binyon finds what appears to be the transaction, which initially seems damning for Waverly. In a private interrogation room, Waverly admits to Friday and Gannon that there was such a transaction, but that it was Clover paying him back for a gambling loan from when they were in the service.

    After he breaks the code, Binyon reveals before the board that the markings indicate that the transaction was indeed recorded as paying a debt. Deputy Chief Simon, presiding over the board (Art Balinger, who usually plays one of their rotating division captains, most often Hugh Brown), declares that he's turning over the transcripts to the DA with the recommendation that Clover be charged for perjury.

    Dragnet49.jpg
    Dragnet50.jpg


    "The Christmas Story"
    Originally aired December 21, 1967
    Yes, that was it. There was some music and a pan over the city where I put the ellipses. And more oddly, this one has opening titles for Dragnet 1970 and closing titles for Dragnet 1969! An IMDb blurb explains that this is an artifact of the episode having been re-aired in subsequent holiday seasons during the show's original run.

    Wednesday, December 24: Friday and Gannon are working the day watch out of Burglary Division when they're sent to a San Fernando mission church to look into the theft of a Jesus statue from the church's manger scene. The statue has no real monetary value, but is of great traditional value to the church and its parishioners. Friday expresses his surprise when Father Rojas (Harry Bartell) tells him that the church isn't locked up at night...

    Friday: You leave it wide open, so any thief can walk in?
    Rojas: Particularly thieves.​

    In addition to checking a religious paraphernalia store where it might have been pawned, the detectives go around questioning people known to have been at the church around that time. One of them is a kid who helps out at the church played by Barry Williams, who gives them a lead about a man seen lingering at the church named Claude Stroup. They visit the seedy hotel where Stroup lives and learn from the desk clerk that he has a record, though they can't find anything under that name. At around this point, Captain Mack (Byron Morrow) wants them to put the matter aside for a higher-priority case, but they use some reverse psychology to get him to let them keep at it.

    Going back to the hotel they find Stroup (Mark VII favorite Bobby Troup) and take him to the station. It takes them a while to get him to talk, but when he does, it becomes clear that he thinks it's about an unrelated incident involving him having borrowed a car and gotten into a fender-bender. They let him go and resign themselves to telling Rojas that they couldn't find the statue in time for the Christmas service. While they're doing that, a young boy comes into the church pulling a red wagon, with the statue in it. The boy, Pacito, explains to Father Rojas in Spanish that he'd been praying for a red wagon for years, and that he promised the baby Jesus that if he got one, he'd let Jesus have the first ride! Gannon asks why the boy got his gift today and the Father explains that it was a gift from a charity program in which firemen fix up old toys, because Pacito's family is poor.
    This one has no mugshots or announcements at the end, it just goes to the closing credits.

    I also read on IMDb that this was a remake of an episode from the original Dragnet TV series, which included three of the original guest actors reprising their roles. This might explain why they used a date that hadn't occurred since 1958!

    _______
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2019
  15. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Some really love this version, but to me, nothing ever compared to Nino Rota's work composed for the film--



    --which is so rich in capturing the emotional highs and lows of the Zeffirelli film.

    A song that does not get as much attention as it should.

    .........................
     
  16. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    A few seasonal changes on MeTV and H&I...Me made some changes to their Saturday night/Sunday morning lineup, which included moving Star Trek up earlier and LiS back later, adding The Invaders, and bringing back Planet of the Apes. As for H&I, The Green Hornet is back, early on Sunday morning before Adventures of Superman.
     
  17. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Talk about a chick magnet.

    That seems pretty wild for The Saint.

    :rommie:

    Apparently, it was a subject for parody even then. :rommie:

    That's a thought. Maybe it was.

    Which can cut both ways....

    Why didn't he just say that to begin with? Why get his buddy in trouble?

    For saying that he was offered a bribe? Again, why lie? I'm not getting the motivations for either of these guys.

    Oh, yeah, I remember this one, too.

    Yeah, I noticed The Invaders and Planet of the Apes on the MeTV schedule. Looks like Night Stalker is gone. Too bad, but I suppose you can only re-run twenty episodes so many times.
     
  18. TREK_GOD_1

    TREK_GOD_1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Didn't they run int that same problem the last time Planet of the Apes--with its 14 episodes--was in rotation?
     
  19. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Mih ssim, mih ssim, nam, daed si Xim. Moderator

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    And they acknowledged that in the episode. Back at the office when he was assigned, Friday objected because he wasn't a lawyer and that he was prejudiced--if the guy was guilty he'd want to throw the book at him. Gannon noted that if he wasn't guilty, Joe would try just as hard to clear him.

    Waverly was playing it pretty stupid, which included not identifying himself as a cop. He thought that it all looked too bad and nobody would believe him. And his fears weren't unfounded--if the bookie hadn't accurately recorded that transaction as a debt in his ledger, he'd have been screwed.

    As for the bookie, he was trying to get his old friend in trouble, to get back at him for not accepting the actual bribe offer he'd tried to make. He wanted a little help making the police look the other way from his activities.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2019
  20. RJDiogenes

    RJDiogenes Idealistic Cynic and Canon Champion Premium Member

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    Yeah, that's true. Maybe they'll alternate these two series on the schedule. Which would be cool, since the two shows are forever connected in my head because they premiered the same night. Planet of the Apes was on at 8 and Night Stalker was on at 10, with Six-Million Dollar Man in the middle-- a good night for 13-year-old me.

    Ah, okay, that makes sense then.
     
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