So What Are you Reading?: Generations

Discussion in 'Trek Literature' started by captcalhoun, Dec 22, 2011.

  1. John Clark

    John Clark Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Started on Ghost Rider One by Gerry Carroll at lunch.
    (It's a naval aviation book rather than the character one). I've read it before but it's been a while.
     
  2. Reanok

    Reanok Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Star trek Ds9 Force and Motion by Jeffrey Lang
     
  3. hbquikcomjamesl

    hbquikcomjamesl Commodore Commodore

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    But alas, it would be kind of hard to find actors who could fit into, for example, a Motie* suit. Much less, say, a Thranx** suit.
    _____
    * I read The Mote in God's Eye, decades ago. I didn't care much for Pournelle's milieu, although I suppose I don't actively dislike it nearly as much as I do Frank Herbert's milieu.
    **On the other hand, I love Foster's Humanx Commonwealth mileu.
     
  4. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Not questioning that. Just saying that if you can suspend disbelief about that, a statite should be far easier to accept.
     
  5. hbquikcomjamesl

    hbquikcomjamesl Commodore Commodore

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    I quite agree, actually. Be afraid. Be very afraid.

    Many years ago, I read Tolkien's essay, On Fairy-Stories. Tolkien had a problem with the phrase, "willing suspension of disbelief," preferring "literary belief," and I find his argument most persuasive.
     
  6. Smiley

    Smiley Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I finished Desperate Hours. There's a lot to like there, especially for fans of Burnham and Spock. I also really liked the mini-adventure with Saru and Una. The stuff with the colonists did not amount to much for me, and I would be just as happy to have the Juggernaut and Starfleet's orders be the main problems of the story. I'd recommend it to any Star Trek fan for at least one read. My rating is a strong 7/10, Above Average.

    Did anybody else get reminded even a little bit of the Qella Lando/Lobot story from the Black Fleet Crisis trilogy in Star Wars Legends? Unfortunately for the Trek characters, the Juggernaut was a little more antagonistic in purpose than the Qella egg.
     
  7. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    That's what we have mo-cap for.

    I finished up ST Titan: Fortune of War last night, I really enjoyed it. I'll post more detailed thought in it's review thread.
    Once that was done I tried to read the digital edition of the comic collection STVOY: Encounters with the Unknown, but once I saw that it was missing a page, I decided to just wait and read the scanned version off the comics DVD, and read the ST: Waypoint Special 2018, instead. I got the comics from Hoopla.
     
  8. hbquikcomjamesl

    hbquikcomjamesl Commodore Commodore

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    Uh, but the only "mo-cap" we had in 1966 was rotoscoped cel animation.
     
  9. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    You didn't specify that you were talking about the '60s.
     
  10. hbquikcomjamesl

    hbquikcomjamesl Commodore Commodore

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    TOS debuted in 1966.

    Of course, ADF didn't write The Tar-Aiym Krang until years later, and Pournelle & Niven didn't write The Mote in God's Eye until later still, but my point was that depicting non-hominid sentients on a TV series budget was not exactly practical when ST began. And non-hominid sentients were hardly new; consider Arthur C. Clarke's short story, "Second Dawn."
     
  11. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    On the contrary, The Outer Limits did it frequently starting three years earlier, with techniques ranging from monster suits to puppetry to stop-motion animation. For that matter, TOS featured non-humanoid alien "monsters" far more frequently than the later, higher-budget Trek series did, because that was part and parcel of screen sci-fi in the '60s.

    And I ask again, since when was anyone talking about what was practical on a TV budget? I was talking about the real-world credibility of the concept. I was questioning the assertion that statites, a perfectly reasonable idea achievable in theory with known technology, are somehow harder to buy in a Trek novel than all the fanciful contrivances it routinely uses for the sake of storytelling (humanoid aliens being simply one of many).
     
  12. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    But you never specified that you were talking when TOS began, all you said was that those aliens couldn't be played by people in costumes.
     
  13. theblitz

    theblitz Commander Red Shirt

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    Done with "To Reign in Hell".
    Loved it.
    Still plenty of room for more story lines.

    Decided it was time for some lighter reading (both physically and metaphorically):
    The Star Ghost
     
  14. theblitz

    theblitz Commander Red Shirt

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    Yes and no.
    Remember that they are based in the 20th century.
     
  15. Smiley

    Smiley Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I am halfway through Child of Two Worlds by Greg Cox. So far, the situation reminds me a lot of "Suddenly Human" from TNG. In both cases, there really is no fully satisfying solution. More information may come to light to make the final outcome more palatable, though.
     
  16. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    So what? Robert L. Forward patented statites in 1993. And we're talking about a version of the 20th century where they have genetic engineering in the 1960s and an interstellar sleeper ship by 1996, so I ask again, how is a solar-sail satellite the one thing you find implausible here?
     
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  17. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    I finished up ST: SCE: Cold Fusion in the second paperback collection Miracle Workers last night, which I really enjoyed. Reading this really made miss having @KRAD as one of our regular Trek authors. I know the Corsi/Stephens relationship is an ongoing thing for a while, so I enjoyed seeing how it all got started. I'm a big fan of Nog, so I really enjoyed his role in the story. The introduction of the Androssi was good to, they were pretty interesting antagonists, and their interest in technology makes them a good match for the SCE.
    I had originally planned on going straight to the next story, Invincible, which is technically two novellas, but put together to make one story in the paperback, but I decided to take a break and started the first story arc of the DC's New 52 Aquaman series, written by Geoff Johns and art by Ivan Reis. I have the individual digital issues and I got through #1 and started #2 so far.
     
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  18. Nyotarules

    Nyotarules Vice Admiral Moderator

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    Just bought Picard Last great hope cos it was cheap
     
  19. KRAD

    KRAD Keith R.A. DeCandido Admiral

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    Thanks, JD! I miss being a regular Trek author, too.....
     
  20. USS Firefly

    USS Firefly Commodore Commodore

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    Next to canceling the current Trek novels that was the dumbest decision they could make