Sept. Art Challenge - Harry

Discussion in 'Fan Art' started by Harry, Sep 18, 2007.

  1. Harry

    Harry Captain Captain

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    Soo.. contemporary stuff.. I like alternate space programs that are a bit more.. exciting.. than the endless budget cuts of real life.

    This is an image challenge, so excuse the big image:

    [​IMG]

    It's the sub-orbital warhead platform so chillingly envisioned for Assignment: Earth, with some very bleak flavor quotes from TOS. From that dialogue, it seems Gary Seven was not particularly succesful. Or at least the Soviets had orbital nukes to wich the Americans responded.

    I suspect there may be room for the Dyna-Soar or similar craft in Trek's timeline to complement the orbital platforms (the Outer Space Treaty apparently was not created in the TOS timeline).

    The episode only mentions one warhead on the launched platform, but in general they are described as 'multi-warhead'. The one sabotaged in TOS is probably a lighter version or some kind of prototype.
     
  2. Albertese

    Albertese Commodore Commodore

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    Awesome. I love it.
     
  3. Trekker4747

    Trekker4747 Boldly going... Premium Member

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    Did the Earth move in this paticular vision? Making it the fourth-most planet?

    ;)
     
  4. Capt_Jason

    Capt_Jason Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Wow! It's good to see you back, Harry! When I saw the thread, I was half-expecting to see a bit more on your DY-series development but this piece is awesome! Now at last we have the visuals to explain what that big ol' Saturn 5 was carrying on that chilly day in 1968.

    Do you plan on continuing your DY-series development?
     
  5. Turbo

    Turbo Anthro Hawk Premium Member

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    Looks great, though it's strange to see the Saturn V as a WMD.

    Here's a few technical comments from the point of view of someone who's far too obsessed with the space program:
    - Use two solar panels; Skylab only had the one as her second was ripped off by the loss of her micrometeoroid shield. Also, I'd add at least one solar panel to each assembly. If you look at Skylab, she had three solar panels the same length as yours on one arm. (Solar panels in 1968 weren't nearly as advanced as they are today.)
    - Do you intend to have the ODM be able to move itself into a different orbit? If not, I'd replace the engines with a dummy head or even a docking adapter to allow a CSM to move the ODM.
    - Make the antenna smaller; the Apollo CSM's high-gain antenna was only about the size of the U in USAF. Unless, of course, this is posing as a very large and heavy communications satellite. ;)
    - Add CSM-style RCS thrusters to the outside of the ODM. You need to be able to orient the platform on orbit, and you can't do that with an engine bell.
    - Whether you use the engine bell or a dummy head, it's way too small. Here's a good reference pic of the bottom of the S-IVB stage. To fit into the Saturn V correctly, the ODM needs to have the same engine configuration. I'd also use one or two of these engines in the Justicar instead of the several you have.
    - On the ODM, I'd make the black stripe extend up to the 'adaptor' piece, or I'd replace the space in between with white. This is the location of the Saturn's instrument unit; the computer that tells the rocket what to do. It came in both colors (black on the V and white on the IB), but it's something that really needs to be represented on the ODM, since your nose cone covers it. (And it's a good thing to keep it because then the ODM has a proven onboard computer.)
    - It's not a technical comment, but might I recommend a grayer background? It's hard to make out the lower details of the Saturn.

    Having said all of that, this looks absolutely fantastic, not to mention quite authentic! I would never have thought of turning an S-IVB stage into an orbital weapons platform. And you kept the instrument unit; this design wouldn't even need an internal computer system with a modified IU.

    All in all, keep up the great work! :thumbsup:
     
  6. Klaus

    Klaus Vice Admiral Admiral

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    very nicely done!
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Harry

    Harry Captain Captain

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    Sheesh.. It was 2 o'clock in the morning when I finished this...

    The DY-245 is still coming along slowly. I'm trying to work out some sort of natural evolution of impulse type engines. But I get easily distracted by challenges like this ;)

    And thanks for the technical comments, Turbo. I'm definitely going to do a second pass with that information.
     
  8. Masao

    Masao Commodore Commodore

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    Very nice, Harry.
    About your use of "suborbit": As I understand it, something can be put into "suborbit" but it falls right out. Anything that doesn't reach orbit is suborbital and would be on a balllistic path up and then down again. Examples would be Al Shephard's Mercury capsule, ICBMs, and Spaceship One.
     
  9. Griffworks

    Griffworks Commander Red Shirt

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    Great work, gaff w/the position of our beloved planet not withstanding. :)
     
  10. Turbo

    Turbo Anthro Hawk Premium Member

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    Whoops, can't believe I didn't see that the first time through. Yeah, it should read something like this:

    "In response to nuclear warheads placed in low Earth orbit by other major powers, the United States today is launching its own orbital plaform with multi-warhead capacity."
     
  11. Harry

    Harry Captain Captain

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    Actually, those are verbatim quotes from the TOS episode. The first bit is read by Gary Seven (Supervisor 194), the bottom bit is dialogue between Kirk and Spock.
     
  12. aridas sofia

    aridas sofia Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    That is a fascinating contradiction, that might afford you a creative opportunity. There must be an orbital and suborbital component to the thing -- the platform is orbital, and the warheads upon release are suborbital.

    Two quotes from the episode give you this out:

    and

    The one that causes the problem:

    should be considered impossible and contradicted by the "orbital nuclear warhead platform" quote. Or, it should be interpreted as meaning "suborbital" when they malfunction and become ballistic headaches.
     
  13. Harry

    Harry Captain Captain

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    Suborbital warheads would be regular ICBMs, as far as I am aware. In the 1960s the Soviets were working on 'FOBS' (an US Intelligence term), so the idea of nuclear weapons in orbit was not that far off. Though it seems that they mixed up 'suborbital' and 'lower orbit'. Translating suborbital to LEO is the best fix, I reckon.

    Here's a second pass, with a different presentation:

    [​IMG]

    And a close-up of the ODP (new acronym):

    [​IMG]

    I imagine that, to complement this kind of technology, the USAF actually does launch their MOL, and get their version of Gemini (Big Gemini). I believe Dyna-Soar was cancelled already during TOS's time, so Gemini may be the way to go. But I would like to imagine these beautiful spaceplanes existed in the Trek timeline, maybe in the 70s or 80s.
     
  14. Harry

    Harry Captain Captain

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    Oh, and this was a previous sketch for the contest:

    [​IMG]

    A sketch-y version of what the TMK-1 (Mars-Venus flyby concept) might've looked like as an operational Mars flyby mission. This was just a quick drawing with some shapes stolen from various places.
     
  15. Turbo

    Turbo Anthro Hawk Premium Member

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    That looks great, Harry! The vehicles look great (and the solar panels make it look like a very real spacecraft), and the faux New York Times article is a nice touch.

    I'm guessing that the Harpies are about the size of the Redstone?

    I also wish that the Gemini B missions had gone ahead, because even though it was a military project, we would have had a permanent presence in space since the early 1970s. I still can't believe that no-one at NASA had the idea to pull an unused Saturn IB out of storage and launch an automated CSM to Skylab to boost its orbit in 1978. They wouldn't even have had to send a crew on board; the docking could have been controlled remotely.
     
  16. Trekker4747

    Trekker4747 Boldly going... Premium Member

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    And if it ever breaks down you can just send Clint Eastwood, Tommy Lee Jones, Donald Sullivan and James Gardner up to fix it!

    ;)

    Very cool designs.
     
  17. Turbo

    Turbo Anthro Hawk Premium Member

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    ^ :guffaw:

    I was thinking that too. Does it use the guidance system from Skylab?
     
  18. Harry

    Harry Captain Captain

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    Either that or a fancy military guidance system from MOL ;)
     
  19. Flux Capacitor

    Flux Capacitor Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Okay, maybe I'm a huge perv, but am I the only one who thinks that looks a little...phallic? :cardie:
     
  20. Griffworks

    Griffworks Commander Red Shirt

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    Of course it's phallic! It was designed by a man, wasn't it? :D