Pentagon laser that can ID via heartbeat

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Cyanide Muffin, Jun 28, 2019.

  1. Cyanide Muffin

    Cyanide Muffin All hail Doctor 13 Premium Member

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  2. rhubarbodendron

    rhubarbodendron Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Frankly, from the pov of a biologist I doubt this will work. The mechanism detects turbulence patterns in the blood. But so many factors influence the mechanics of blood flow: hormones and certain illnesses as well as age render blood vessels thinner along the wall and/or clogged on the inside), aneurysms will alter the blood current patterns and some medication (blood thinners, for example) will alltogether alter the way the blood's flowing behaviour. An injury and the resulting scar or a few blocked capillaries (for example with diabetics) can also change the blood flow and consequently the turbulence patterns in the flowing blood.
    Also - faint hearted men continue reading at your own risk! - women who are pregnant or have their period will have different flow patterns from day to day and thus register false signals. The same goes for females suffering from endometriosis or cysts and for both genders that have any other growths that change the blood flow physically.
    When we get older, the Valvulae Venosae (my appologies - I couldn't find out what they are called in English, so I must use the medical term) start to slacken which we notice when the blood remains in our legs and can't be pumped upwards again. This, too, changes the currents in the blood and the laser will not recognize the person anymore.

    There are too many variables to be taken into consideration for such a device to work with the required accuracy.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2019
  3. Cyanide Muffin

    Cyanide Muffin All hail Doctor 13 Premium Member

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    Your spelling was almost spot on ... Congrats.

    I'd agree with that and the fact heartbeats can change with varying health conditions or exertion, people doing heavier work then just plain relaxing or regular things. This sounds cool but highly impractical. But hey it's tax dollars at work hey?
     
  4. rhubarbodendron

    rhubarbodendron Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    almost? Oh dash it, did I overlook one again?
    I'd appreciate tax dollars to do some work that benefits the tax payer. But I'm afraid that's an utopia in pretty much every country.
     
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  5. Cyanide Muffin

    Cyanide Muffin All hail Doctor 13 Premium Member

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    Oh you did well I love medical words and you only missed a single letter.
     
  6. rhubarbodendron

    rhubarbodendron Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    oh right! The context requires the plural and I used the singular. Does it count as a mitigating circumstance that my last Latin lesson was 35 years ago? ;)
     
  7. Cyanide Muffin

    Cyanide Muffin All hail Doctor 13 Premium Member

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    Oh gods no I am not complaining.
     
  8. rhubarbodendron

    rhubarbodendron Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Please don't worry! I didn't for a moment consider your comments a complaint. Not being a native speaker I wholeheartedly appreciate it when people alert me to spelling errors. Only an error pointed out is an error to be avoided in the future :beer:
     
  9. Steven P Bastien

    Steven P Bastien Captain Captain

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    I can see the problem that some things could alter turbulent flow and hence you would end up rejecting a person's identity incorrectly. But, perhaps a benefit of this approach is that it would be difficult to fake someone else's turbulent pattern. So, perhaps this protects against impersonation. This could be combined with other approaches to make it harder for someone to impersonate another person.
     
  10. rhubarbodendron

    rhubarbodendron Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    that's an excellent point I had completely overlooked.
    I'd not use that laser for military purposes, though. It'd be an excellent instrument for cardiologists. If used at a close range it might be helpful in detecting obstacles to the blood flow. It'd save gazillions of lives if a thrombus could be detected before it causes a stroke, heart failure or lung embolism.
     
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  11. publiusr

    publiusr Vice Admiral Admiral

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  12. Cyanide Muffin

    Cyanide Muffin All hail Doctor 13 Premium Member

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  13. publiusr

    publiusr Vice Admiral Admiral

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    More intrusive:
    www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/device-can-hear-voice-inside-your-head-180972785/
    https://www.sciencealert.com/neuros...-an-entirely-new-form-of-neural-communication

    Scientists think they've identified a previously unknown form of neural communication that self-propagates across brain tissue, and can leap wirelessly from neurons in one section of brain tissue to another – even if they've been surgically severed.

    Quantum news
    www.scientificamerican.com/article/qutrit-experiments-are-a-first-in-quantum-teleportation/
     
  14. Delta Geminorum

    Delta Geminorum Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    The Pentagon has a laser that can kill you too.
     
  15. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I have to wonder if something like this would be able to predict an oncoming heart-attack. It sounds like if it's looking at the blood flow that it'd be theoretically possible.
     
  16. Cyanide Muffin

    Cyanide Muffin All hail Doctor 13 Premium Member

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    I'm sure they do. They might also have particle beams. Those have been researched.

    Lasers are awesome. But the Pentagon never put them on sharks.
     
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  17. Delta Geminorum

    Delta Geminorum Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Only if they are ill-tempered.
     
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