Non-Star Trek space opera and military scifi books you enjoy

Discussion in 'Science Fiction & Fantasy' started by Charles Phipps, May 13, 2022.

  1. Charles Phipps

    Charles Phipps Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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  2. theenglish

    theenglish Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I recently read all the Murderbot series. Lots of fun and a quirky commentary on the modern world.
     
  3. Charles Phipps

    Charles Phipps Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I love Murderbot. I hope that series goes on forever.
     
  4. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    I got the e-book version of the first one of those, but I haven't read it yet. I've heard nothing but good things about the series.
     
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  5. publiusr

    publiusr Vice Admiral Admiral

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    In terms of art compilations, the Terran Trade Authority books
     
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  6. Serveaux

    Serveaux Mediocre Old White Man Premium Member

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    Honor Harrington ran out of steam early, for me - the character checks every box next to the classic definition of "Mary Sue." The characterization is pure fanfic.

    I liked the Merrimack novels. They were quirky
     
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  7. Unicron

    Unicron Boss Monster Mod Moderator

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    I was recently telling someone about the two volume Steampunk Soldiers series from Osprey. It's set around the turn of the 20th century on a world where a new element (hephestium) fell on Earth in 1862 from a meteor shower, causing an industrial revolution earlier than our timeline. By the early 1900s, things like aircraft, submarines, combat walkers, and automatic weapons (among others) are already common in most nations.

    Because the bulk of the deposits landed in parts of North America, it dramatically changed the evolution of history. The American Civil War lasted twice as long and the Confederacy won, due in part to using different tactics as well as gaining better economy with the hephestium they acquired. They also blocked the Union attempts to gain control of the Mississippi River. It's hinted that the two halves might reconcile their differences and perhaps even reunite at some point.

    British Canada became the jewel in the imperial crown, rather than India (which is part of the Empire but suffering stronger revolts), and the Russian Empire (this world's leader in submarine technology) had no reason to sell their colony in Alaska. Tensions along the Alaskan/Canadian border are perpetually high, based on real historical tensions between the Russians and British at this point in time. Germany and Japan are rising powers, not too unlike their real counterparts, albeit with more advanced technology. The Tesla of this Earth is employed by the Austro-Hungarian Empire to design electrical and chemical weapons.

    Another major shift on the American continent is that the various Native tribes, whose lands in the western regions have been threatened by the Union and the Confederacy, have become far more united than their historical counterparts. Rather than waiting to fight the American governments piecemeal, the tribes have become closer and better organized as well as having modern automatic weapons and similar technology. If a western push were to be attempted, it would be far more difficult and bloody than our version.

    It's unclear if any counterparts of the late 19th century wars or a looming equivalent of the Great War might be on the horizon, as the books don't go into a lot of political analysis. It's mentioned that the Japanese fought some colonial wars in Asia with the British and other powers, but they seem to be smaller in scale than a conflict like the Russo-Japanese War. But it's an interesting take on alternate history and there's a lot of possibilities in such a setting. :)
     
  8. Nerys Myk

    Nerys Myk Garth of Algar Premium Member

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    Gordon R. Dickson's Dorsai books.
     
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  9. Kraig

    Kraig Commander Red Shirt

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    Jack Campbell (a.k.a. John Hemry)
    The first series of military sci-fi books that I started reading was the Lost Fleet, Lost Fleet:Beyond the Frontier, and Lost Stars they take place in the future and in the same universe, as opposed to the Stark's War series listed below that take place in the present day.

    I'm currently reading his Stark's War books.

    Craig Alanson
    I've read all the Expeditionary Force (1-13) books that have been released so far. I have Expeditionary Force 14 Match Game on pre-order (June 7). I have read Expeditionary Force: Mavericks (1 & 2) books. If you like book one in the series then I recommend the rest.

    John Scalzi's Old Man's War and Interdependency series. The second series has less war and more political intrigue.

    Also Joe Halderman's Forever War series is pretty good.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2022
  10. Neopeius

    Neopeius Admiral Admiral

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    Those are so trippy, especially seeing the original art on the covers of 70s science fiction books!

    Not exactly space opera, but you might enjoy The Kitra Saga -- the third book (coming out June 2023) is the closest the series veers to space opera.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2022
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  11. 100Pic

    100Pic Lieutenant Red Shirt

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    The first Dune book, of course. The first "Cobra" trilogy by Timothy Zahn. Anything by Niven & Pournelle. I enjoyed Pandora's Star by Peter F Hamilton but gollygosh it was a long book.

    Personally, I didn't gel with the first Honor Harrington book. Old Man's War was entertaining but, for me personally, a little bit too "light".
     
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  12. Charles Phipps

    Charles Phipps Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I do recommend the Expeditionary Force books, they're quite entertaining even if a bit overwritten.
     
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  13. JD

    JD Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    They're not military sci-fi, but I have heard a lot of good things about Becky Chambers' Wayfarers series.
     
  14. Paul Weaver

    Paul Weaver Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    And part 2 as well I guess (Judas unchained?)

    Hamilton does well with world building imo. I liked that duology somewhat, and the reality trilogy. I didn’t get into the void stuff set in the Pandora’s star universe though.

    Just started reading his latest trilogy set in a new word (arhough with similar tech - wormholes and life extensions), it’s weird though as there’s the main story, with flashbacks for character background, but then there’s a completely separate story set a long way in the future, not a narrative device I can recall seeing before, not sure how much I like it, but I’ll persist.
     
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  15. Kraig

    Kraig Commander Red Shirt

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    I finished Peter F. Hamilton's Salvation, I'm starting the second book in the Salvation Sequence Series, Salvation Lost (only 561pages). :D
     
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  16. diankra

    diankra Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    As said in another thread, David Feintuch's Seafort saga, particularly the early books.
    After the yahwehist reunion, Earth has become a theocracy where oaths are serious, and the Navy regs inviolable. And so, after accidents and illness, a 16 year old midshipman is the senior line officer left alive on UNSS Hibernia, six months out from Earth and a year off arrival at Hope Nation, and therefore captain, unless he breaks his oath and therefore damns his soul.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2022
  17. diankra

    diankra Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Interviewed him, asked about his crimes against trees. "Renewable resource!"
     
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  18. Nomad V

    Nomad V Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    I spend a lot of time in cars so audio books have been the way I go lately. Some of the space operas that I have been reading or listening to include: Expeditionary Force (with Skippy the Magnificent), The Frontier Series, Galaxy's Edge, The Spinward Fringe series among others.
     
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  19. Scout101

    Scout101 Admiral Admiral

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    good stuff, Interdependency was a good series. Was actually disappointed in how brief it was, he’s left a LOT on the table there to go and pick up on. Could have done more than a series just on the space part and backstory, didn’t even overly need the politics. Hope there’s more coming there.
     
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  20. valkyrie013

    valkyrie013 Commodore Commodore

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    Happy to see Expeditionary force come up, really do like that series of books.. Kindle Unlimited if your interested. He has a fantasy trilogy I'm reading right now, so far so good.
    Read everything Peter F Hamilton has written. The last trilogy was a bit meh though. Good but not as captivating as his others.
    Honor Harington is reasonably good but he really hasn't written much as of late.
    The survivors book series is interesting.. But it is getting long winded.. Should have stopped a book 6 or so and started another series.
     
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