Excelsior Technical Manual: Grand Finale

Didn't the VIP quarters have food slots on the refit Constitution-class starships? That might help for placement in senior officers quarters
 
Super work; I'm looking forward on this project! :)

Thank you so much, I really appreciate it. :)

Didn't the VIP quarters have food slots on the refit Constitution-class starships? That might help for placement in senior officers quarters

You have an excellent memory; I'd completely forgotten. Both senior officer and VIP quarters have a food slot:
2eOp1oQ.jpg

That location makes a lot of sense to me, and the replicator location in the set on TNG is roughly in the same spot. I expect my senior officers quarters and VIP quarters will look a lot like this, though I will either have to create a reverse curve version or have two versions. I don't think this design yields itself to a 'neutral" version especially well. We'll see.

On a related note, I'd forgotten how much I like the "Mr. Scott's Guide" crew quarters:
cSIHf2O.jpg


Even if those were bunk beds, they'd be more private. But, I can see an advantage to a larger, more open plan.

It'd certainly be less claustrophobic. :rommie:
 
Thank you so much, I really appreciate it. :)



You have an excellent memory; I'd completely forgotten. Both senior officer and VIP quarters have a food slot:
2eOp1oQ.jpg

That location makes a lot of sense to me, and the replicator location in the set on TNG is roughly in the same spot. I expect my senior officers quarters and VIP quarters will look a lot like this, though I will either have to create a reverse curve version or have two versions. I don't think this design yields itself to a 'neutral" version especially well. We'll see.

On a related note, I'd forgotten how much I like the "Mr. Scott's Guide" crew quarters:
cSIHf2O.jpg


Even if those were bunk beds, they'd be more private. But, I can see an advantage to a larger, more open plan.

It'd certainly be less claustrophobic. :rommie:
Have you ever thought of following the Japanese style of Bathroom design where they seperate the:
Toilet Room, Shower, BathTub, and sink areas?

There are good reasons why the Japanese generally do that and efficiency & cleanliness are part of those reasons.

You should look up Japanese Bathroom designs and think about if it's worth changing the bathroom around.
 
2eOp1oQ.jpg

That location makes a lot of sense to me, and the replicator location in the set on TNG is roughly in the same spot. I expect my senior officers quarters and VIP quarters will look a lot like this, though I will either have to create a reverse curve version or have two versions. I don't think this design yields itself to a 'neutral" version especially well. We'll see.

On a related note, I'd forgotten how much I like the "Mr. Scott's Guide" crew quarters:
cSIHf2O.jpg


Even if those were bunk beds, they'd be more private. But, I can see an advantage to a larger, more open plan.

It'd certainly be less claustrophobic. :rommie:
I'm sorry, but those are all very awkward layouts. You have to go thru a sleeping area to get to the office/work area in the Officer's/VIP quarters (literally having to squeeze past a bed in the VIP quarters). And having to go thru the bathroom to get to the closet, pushing past whoever's using the sink or toilet at the time, is very inconvenient.
 
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I'm sorry, but those are all very awkward layouts. You have to go thru a sleeping area to get to the office/work area in the Officer's/VIP quarters (literally having to squeeze past a bed in the VIP quarters). And having to go thru the bathroom to get to the closet, pushing past whoever's using the sink or toilet at the time, is very inconvenient.

Well, putting the door in the bedroom and not the office is TMP's fault (probably so they could put a wall in the set and turn it into half-sized quarters for junior officers, and I guess they didn't want to put an exterior door in both segments like the TOS version). Same with (more-or-less) the positioning of the shower. While the layout was idealized and regularized compared to the real set, I'm having trouble imaging an alternate layout that fits in everything with the constraints of what was on-screen (no closet in the sleeping area, shower in front of the door).

I have noticed that it seems to becoming more popular (in apartments, at least) to put the closet into the bathroom, which makes a lot of sense to me.
 
Have you ever thought of following the Japanese style of Bathroom design where they seperate the:
Toilet Room, Shower, BathTub, and sink areas?

There are good reasons why the Japanese generally do that and efficiency & cleanliness are part of those reasons.

You should look up Japanese Bathroom designs and think about if it's worth changing the bathroom around.

Great suggestion! I'm on it. Thank you!

We see a full on TNG style replicator in Kirk's quarters in Star Trek 6.

I'm playing "squint and pretend" with that one, that it's just a food slot that looks suspiciously modern.

I'm also kind of ignoring the Enterprise-A quarters overall. I consider that ship to be an experimental oddity.

I'm sorry, but those are all very awkward layouts. You have to go thru a sleeping area to get to the office/work area in the Officer's/VIP quarters (literally having to squeeze past a bed in the VIP quarters). And having to go thru the bathroom to get to the closet, pushing past whoever's using the sink or toilet at the time, is very inconvenient.

Agreed, I think the TNG revamps (enter the living area and can then go to the sleeping area) makes much more sense.

Well, putting the door in the bedroom and not the office is TMP's fault (probably so they could put a wall in the set and turn it into half-sized quarters for junior officers, and I guess they didn't want to put an exterior door in both segments like the TOS version). Same with (more-or-less) the positioning of the shower. While the layout was idealized and regularized compared to the real set, I'm having trouble imaging an alternate layout that fits in everything with the constraints of what was on-screen (no closet in the sleeping area, shower in front of the door).

I have noticed that it seems to becoming more popular (in apartments, at least) to put the closet into the bathroom, which makes a lot of sense to me.

I agree that part of the reason for this was that they intended for "Phase II" to be able to redress the sleeping area for Junior Officers Quarters as Lora depicted in "Mr. Scott's Guide." But, that still didn't preclude including a door in the other area and I have no idea why they didn't do it. In-universe you might think that part of the idea was that the living area could be repurposed for some other type of separate room... but then it still had no door. :rommie:

As an aside, my first apartment had the sink/dressing area separate from the toilet/tub room and the closet opposite the sink/dressing area and it is still probably my favorite layout. But they could have easily added another door and made it all a part of the bathroom.
 
Been following this thread and very much enjoying it, but just now have a question to pose, since it might be worth considering one way or the other. Have you considered that the original "Phase II" Captain's quarters had one large bed, and might this be something the V.I.P. quarters should have, or would it be too wasteful of space?
 
@TIN_MAN I'm very glad you've been enjoying it, thank you for following :)

And that's a great point, I had nearly forgotten about that. I guess Kirk needed a large bed, eh? :rommie:

I have gone back and forth about the VIP quarters. Suppose a VIP brought their family along - perhaps unlikely, but perhaps not in the case of an ambassador or other such dignitary. Where would the kid(s) sleep? I presume that they can be adapted to various requirements. I was also toying with the idea of a "VIP suite" that might have two quarters sharing a bathroom, providing separate sleep and living areas for a group. At any rate, one large bed rather than two smaller beds for the VIP quarters could make sense, as a variation or option if nothing else. I could also see the senior officers having this as an option, particularly if two of them were a couple and sharing. Tom Paris and B'elanna's quarters after they are married comes to mind, although that's a century later and a galaxy away.
 
I've taken a stab at creating Senior Officers Quarters and populating Deck 03:
V5HW8Hr.jpg

I've also filled in more Junior Officers Quarters on Deck 04:
sdjl5e6.jpg


The Senior Officers Quarters feel a little odd since we're used to seeing them in the reverse curve. I think the living area of both the inward curve version and the straight version might need to shrink by around 20% to feel more correct. I think I need to start populating some rough-ins for various support systems to get a greater feel for that, as right now Deck 04 feels pretty empty.

Feedback always welcome! More to come.
 
We've only a few photos of Kirk's cabin in Phase 2 but they do suggest that the door would have been in the living room area, not the bedroom.
If the stage layout had been the same as TMP though, that would put the door almost at the very end of the curved corridor, limiting camera placement and interesting scenes; maybe that's why it was redesigned?
 
The new Food Processor was supposed to be something like what the TNG replicators turned into. A transporter-based delivery system of recombined foodstuffs from the galley with reconstituted plates and utensils. Not quite as advanced at the replicator, but visually not that different.
 
By the time of TNG - and I imagine this probably was prototyped on the Excelsior class and her contemporaries - we see a removal of the internalized deflector "ring" structure. For some reason I think of this new technology as being more like a sensor/deflector "cannon" in that rather than having rings there is a directed device at the heart of the mechanism.

That is interesting. That is a subtle detail, and it is interesting to see it worked out with a reason. The change from a dish that is outside the ship to a dish that is inside the ship for TMP is obvious. However, the smoother shaping around the dish and the fact that it essentially eliminated all but maybe one or two rings around the dish on the Excelsior was probably just a visual choice, and giving it technical reason is a cool idea.
 
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