Classical Music Fans, Unite!

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by eyeresist, Oct 31, 2014.

  1. eyeresist

    eyeresist Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Classical Music Fans, Unite?

    From a quick search it seems there hasn't been an active classical music thread in this forum since 2009. What a shame! I hope I can convince some fans to come out of the woodwork. Newbies with questions are welcome too. (And thanks to Youtube it's easier than ever to explore and find what you like.)
    After all, isn't classical the best music for anything to do with space?

    I started off listening to sci-fi soundtracks, and luckily my father had a few classical things in his collection to channel my interest in the right direction. I like orchestral music and (more recently) chamber music. For a long time my focus was Late Romantic and tonal Modern music, but recently I've been digging into earlier stuff, mostly Mozart ;) but also Schubert and Vivaldi.

    What are you into at the moment? Who are your favourite composers and musicians? How much money have you sunk into your collection? (Vs. how much you've spent on Trek stuff.)
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2014
  2. Foxhot

    Foxhot Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Lots of established classical music runs in the public domain, so I didn't pay overly much for my CDs. But my two biggest favorites would currently be Vaughan Williams ANTARCTICA SUITE and Howard Hanson's ROMANTIC symphony.
     
  3. Green Shirt

    Green Shirt Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Bizet's Carmen and L'Arlesienne (thanks to the Prisoner).

    Tchaikovsky's Polonaise from "Eugene Onegin"
     
  4. eyeresist

    eyeresist Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Hi guys! Foxhot, do you mean Vaughan Williams film score or the symphony (symphony no.7 'Antartica')? I love the symphony, particularly Previn's recording, but I don't think I've ever managed to hear the film score. (I did try to watch the movie but it was pretty awful.)


    For the curious, this is what we are talking about:
    [yt]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fdyFe01NVU0[/yt]




    By the way, if anyone wants to know where the fanfare at the start of the TOS theme came from, check out this clip at 12:27 (and again at 12:45)
    [yt]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nW0nAM2-2tM[/yt]
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2014
  5. Foxhot

    Foxhot Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Number 7, I believe. Are you referring to a silent film? I'm not aware any film was involved, though the music is definitely film-worthy, and it's so powerful it may have been used already.
     
  6. eyeresist

    eyeresist Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Vaughan Williams derived the symphony from music he wrote for the 1948 British film Scott of the Antarctic. (He wrote a bunch of film scores around the time of WW2.) The complete film score was recorded a few years ago by Chandos, and includes music that wasn't in the symphony.

    http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2002/Nov02/RVW_Film1.htm
     
  7. ihno

    ihno Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Hello, here, me. :D

    Classical music is my kind of music. I listen to orchestral and sacral music from Purcell to Elgar (except Wagner and his minions :D ) and I'm a total Hippie (historical informed performances) !

    Baroque: Bach, Zelenka, Vivaldi; Vienna Classic: Michael Haydn especially; Romantik: Hans Neubahn (aka Brahms) and Schumann

    Musicians: Ton Koopman, Christopher Hogwood (RIP!), Herreweghe come to mind at first but as said: I'm a Hippie.

    Right now I listen to the Joseph Haydn symphonies with Hogwood from the unfinished cycle, sob!

    Over the decades I have collected a rather vast collection but I'm not doing the same with Star Trek.
     
  8. eyeresist

    eyeresist Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Hello ihno! I'm not generally a hipster, but prefer a modern chamber orchestra to the Karajan approach, as far as the classical period goes. I'm glad you are unafraid to like Vivaldi ;) I don't know anything about Zelenka and ought to check him out.
    Of the J Haydn symphonies I've heard I most enjoyed the Kuijken recordings, well worth hearing if you haven't yet. Hogwood doesn't do it for me, I'm afraid (largo means slow, dammit).
    It's interesting that you favour Michael Haydn over his brother. Is this specifically in the sacred music area? I've been investigating Schubert's masses etc, and it is sadly his weakest area, though there are still some great moments in 1, 5 & 6.

    I had to google "Hans Neubahn", and still don't quite get it. I read a Brahms biography years ago but this doesn't ring a bell at all. Any clarification will be welcomed...
     
  9. CaptJimboJones

    CaptJimboJones Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Only recently began to expand my listening into classical music, but have quickly become a fan of Beethoven's symphonies (in particular I find the 7th delightful).

    For anyone who is interested in classical but not really sure where to begin (exactly where I was about a year ago) I highly recommend the audio course "How to Listen To and Understand Great Music" by Prof. Robert Greenberg. It's available on audible.com (which is where I downloaded it) and it's an incredibly well-done introduction to classical music, from ancient music through the modern period.
     
  10. ihno

    ihno Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Hello eyeresist

    Who would be afraid to like Vivaldi? Because he is so popular? Or do you refer to snobby-talk? ;)

    This was my first meeting with Zelenka:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yk717tZzKkk (doctor who fans don’t BLINK)
    My fave piece from the Missa votiva:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OgDoKmBRAFs

    We can go deeper into Vivaldi and Zelenka if you like. There is much to say but I don’t want to make my post too long, so you don’t fall asleep while reading (need that space for “Neubahn”).

    To be fair: Kuijken is generally much faster than Hogwood has ever been. I just checked some symphonies they recorded both. Kuijken is Cpt. Speedo … erm Speedy here. ;)


    If you prefer to have it more traditionally I suggest you check the recordings of Frans Bruggen, who died a few weeks ago (sob). He worked with “The orchestra of the 18 century” and his approach had been very “traditional” always.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_c7UNT0DQA0
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bk6TJhH2dXQ (here non HIP)


    Herreweghe is also slower than the others, in addition to his precision it makes his recordings special.

    to “largo, andante” etc in general: It’s not that it’s a mystery what “slow” meant 200 years ago. Beethoven f.e. has given detailed metronome-instructions about the speed he envisioned for his symphonies.
    Today traditional orchestras like Berlin Philharmonic invite Ton Koopman and Trevor Pinnock to learn from them.


    I have recently compared an Abbado recording of the Pergolesi Stabat Mater from 1979 to another recording of the work he did in 2009. The late Abbado (sob) 2009 didn’t sound like he did in 1979. ;)

    There are even FAKE HIP orcestras - a dutch orchestra using old instruments but playing them modern style. :rolleyes:


    I don’t know Schubert’s masses yet. You’re right I stumbled over Michael Haydn’s sacral music. There is still so much of Michael Haydn to discover, lot’s of works that have never been recorded.

    In 1853 Robert Schumann wrote an article about the young Brahms, saying that this young musician would show new musical ways to the world. It was called “Neue Bahnen” (New ways) and did good and bad to Brahms.

    In the second half of the 19th century there has been a big discourse about the “freedom” of music, the value of the sonata-form with exposition, development, reprise etc, the 4 part symphony etc. pp.

    The “neudeutschen” (newgermans) around Mr. Liszt and Mr. Wagner wanted some kind of formal freedom. “The symphony died with Beethoven. All the sontata has to give has been given.” etc. pp.

    Another group – the Academics – wanted to continue to use older forms like the sonataform.

    This was a big debate and issue. You can even see that with Schumann’s four symphonies, the way he used and dismissed the sonata form. Schumann died before the debate really started though.


    There were obvious economical, artistic and personal interests involved. And at lot of mud-throwing.
    Liszt and Wagner favored their own art (poems, new opera etc.) and ridiculed Brahms and others. Maybe Liszt didn’t like Brahms, because Brahms – when they first met – had fallen asleep while Liszt performed his famous sonata in b-minor (so gossip tells us and gossip never lies! :D ). An unforgivable crime. And Wagner… well, I don’t know if there ever was somebody Wagner liked.

    Hans Neubahn was an insulting nickname for Brahms from one of the polemic pamphlets. Hans is the short form of Johannes and “neubahn” refers to that article (neubahn is the short singular of Neue Bahnen [new ways]) ... like "Johnny Newway" or something...

    I really love that name, even though I prefer Brahms – who loved Wagner’s music - for sure. Btw. Schönberg later claimed that it was Brahms, who indeed showed new ways – in decomposing the traditional strict system of harmonies.



    I hope my english is sufficient for such stuff. ;)
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2014
  11. The Mariah Has Awoken

    The Mariah Has Awoken Admiral Admiral

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    Anyone here a fan of Arvo Part?
     
  12. eyeresist

    eyeresist Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    ^ Part doesn't do much for me, but perhaps others here feel different?

    There are indeed people eager to dismiss Vivaldi because of the sheer accessibility of his Four Seasons. Occasionally they recommend performances which "shake the cobwebs off", which I find sound more like attacks than performances.

    The Zelenka links were interesting, thanks, though it seems my streaming capability has gone to crap :(
    I must admit heavy counterpoint is still a bit tough for my ears.

    To be honest I haven't heard Hogwood's Haydn symphonies. I was actually thinking about his Vivaldi. The tempos of his slow movements are one of my obsessions.


    I knew about Brahms and the New Music, but hadn't made the connection for some reason.
    Apparently when Brahms visited Wagner it was a pleasant occasion. After Brahms played a set of piano variations (can't remember which one), Wagner was nice enough to concede "There is plenty left to say in C major." (Or maybe he meant "Which you have failed to say!")


    If you like mid-Romantic symphonies played in historical style, here is a rarity, the 4th symphony of Reber ("the French Schubert"):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndw2cpfDJAk