Warp Speed calculations using Fibonacci numbers

Discussion in 'Trek Tech' started by Sgt_G, Sep 9, 2018.

  1. Sgt_G

    Sgt_G Commodore Commodore

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    I had a oddball idea and played around with some numbers to see if it would work. What if the Warp Speed calculation are misunderstood? What if instead of W being linear, it actually follows a spiral as described by the Fibonacci Sequence?

    Under the current method Warp Speed cubed equals Light Speed:

    1 = 1 = one LY takes a year
    2 = 8 = one LY takes 45 days
    3 = 27 = one LY takes 13 days
    4 = 64 = one LY takes 6 days
    5 = 125 = one LY takes 3 days
    6 = 216 = one LY takes 40 hours
    7 = 343 = one LY takes 25 hours
    8 = 512 = one LY takes 17 hours
    9 = 729 = one LY takes 12 hours
    10 = 1000 = one LY takes 9 hours


    However, if we go by the Fibonacci Sequence, the first two numbers, 0 & 1, are sub-light. The third number, also 1, would be Warp 1. Same as above. Warp 2 = 1+1, and Warp 3 = 1+2. So far so good. But the next Fibonacci number means Warp 4 becomes 2+3 = 5, and then Warp 5 becomes 3+5=8. The chart then becomes:

    1 (0+1) = 1^3= 1 = one LY takes a year
    2 (1+1) = 2^3 = 8 = one LY takes 45 days
    3 (1+2) = 3^3 = 27 = one LY takes 13 days
    4 (2+3) = 5^3 = 125 = one LY takes 3 days
    5 (3+5) = 8^3 = 512 = one LY takes 17 hours
    6 (5+8) = 13^3 = 2,197 = one LY takes 4 hours
    7 (8+13) = 21^3 = 9,261 = one LY takes 56 minutes
    8 (13+21) = 34^3 = 39,304 = one LY takes 13 minutes
    9 (21+34) = 55^3 = 166,375 = one LY takes 3 minutes
    10 (34+55) = 89^3 = 704,969 = one LY takes 45 seconds

    [All times are rounded off.]

    Under this chart, you can actually get someplace in a reasonable amount of time.

    Thought???
     
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  2. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    That's an intriguingly original (yet mathematic) way to get the ever increasing speeds required for higher warp factors.

    It'll be interesting to see how it compares to TOS's usual suspects ;)
     
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  3. CRM-114

    CRM-114 Commander Red Shirt

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    Out of curiosity, where was it established the warp scale was based on Light Speed cubed?
     
  4. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    The season 2 writers' guide, then popularised in Whitfield's book
     
  5. uniderth

    uniderth Commodore Commodore

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    Voyager. 'Nuff said.
     
  6. Sgt_G

    Sgt_G Commodore Commodore

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    Meaning?
     
  7. thribs

    thribs Commodore Fleet Captain

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    There is a memory Alpha Page about warp speeds and goes into the differences between the TOS and next gen scales.
    There are even equations.
     
  8. uniderth

    uniderth Commodore Commodore

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    In Star Trek the Enterprise went fast over long distances on a few occasions. Yet in Voyager it was to take 75 years to make it home.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2018
  9. Sgt_G

    Sgt_G Commodore Commodore

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    I'm aware. I was just suggesting another option....

    Ah. Okay. I was afraid you were referring to that stupid "Warp Ten" episode.
     
  10. uniderth

    uniderth Commodore Commodore

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    You mean that bad dream Tom had after watching too many Captain Proton episodes.

    Though, to address your OP. It's interesting to see a Fibonacci warp scale. I've never heard of one before.
     
  11. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    How would you go about calculation partial warp factors with a Fibonacci sequence?
     
  12. Sgt_G

    Sgt_G Commodore Commodore

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    It should probably be some sort of log scale, but for simple math, I would just on a linear scale based on the difference between the two whole number values. 3 --> 5 = 0.2 each, 5 -- > 8 = 0.3 each, etc, etc.
     
  13. Mark_Nguyen

    Mark_Nguyen Commodore Commodore

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    I like it as a sci-fi concept. The thing is, the Fibonacci sequence is an abstract mathematical concept... It doesn't REALLY mean anything or have consequences in the physical world; it's really just a "neat thing" some Italian nerd came up with and published. You can argue that cubing the warp factor is equally as abstract when applied to velocities, but at least as a concept it does get applied to other real-world maths.

    In TNG they tried applying it roughly to some mysterious universal constant of lightspeed travel as it relates to power required to travel a certain warp factor. The power/speed line that they came up with was completely arbitrary, but at least it was an attempt at relating actual physics to sci-fi concepts.

    Mark
     
  14. Sgt_G

    Sgt_G Commodore Commodore

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    Actually, the Fibonacci sequence is found all over nature, such as in the arrangment of petals on a flower.

    Why would it work for Warp Drive? My explantion is each Warp level creates a "shell" of warped space/time, nesting the previous level(s). The size of each shell increases (or perhaps reduces) in a ratio following the sequence, which also happens to be close to the Golden Ratio = 1.618
     
  15. CorporalCaptain

    CorporalCaptain Fleet Admiral Admiral

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  16. Sgt_G

    Sgt_G Commodore Commodore

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    I used to be really good at math, but that looks Greek to me. :whistle:
     
  17. Mytran

    Mytran Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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