Question for Rick Sternbach regarding Voyager design.

Discussion in 'Trek Tech' started by sojourner, Mar 20, 2009.

  1. sojourner

    sojourner Admiral Admiral

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    Hello,
    This has been nagging me for years. On the Voyager, why did the nacelles change position to go to warp? From a design standpoint it just does not make sense to me. Why not leave them in the correct position all the time? I know the real life answer is the producers wanted "something cool that moved" on the ship. I just wanted your idea on an "in Universe" reason for it. The best idea I came up with would be "variable geometry", i.e. they would change angle of attack to best suit the warp dynamics for the speed they were going. (much like the wings of an F-14 or F-111) Unfortunately, in the show, they were not portrayed this way. They went straight from stowed position to warp position. Thanks in advance for your time!
     
  2. Cmdr Sho

    Cmdr Sho Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

    even though i am not this Rick Sternbach, i think this might help you.

     
  3. QuasarVM

    QuasarVM Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    They did it to get the hell away from the Kazon, Borg, Viidians, and those hunter aliens whose name eludes me at the moment...
     
  4. MyClone

    MyClone Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    I always wondered if the variable-position nacelles on Voyager might be the result of the same Federation-Klingon technology exchange that, as Rick suggested, was behind the Starfleet-looking engines on the Klingon Vor'cha class. After all, the Klingons operate the only other major ship class with wings that (sometimes) change position during warp, the Bird-of-Prey. YMMV.

    Thanks,
    --MyClone
     
  5. BolianAuthor

    BolianAuthor Writer, Battlestar Urantia Rear Admiral

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    IIRC, it had something to do with bringing the warp field tighter in, and closer to the ship, which supposedly was more efficient, or something to that effect.
     
  6. sojourner

    sojourner Admiral Admiral

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    Yes, but none of these really answers the question "Why not build the pylons in the correct position to begin with?" If they had been shown to change position with different warp speeds, I could understand having them move. But if is just for "warp bubble on" and "warp bubble off" why not leave them in the on position?
     
  7. Herkimer Jitty

    Herkimer Jitty Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    cause its space lol
     
  8. Mr. B

    Mr. B Vice Admiral Admiral

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    This may not be the reason, but the bussard collectors would be blocked by the primary hull if the nacelles were locked in the upright position.
     
  9. sojourner

    sojourner Admiral Admiral

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    Lol, so your saying they should NOT be raised at warp?
     
  10. Mr. B

    Mr. B Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I'm not sure there is any circumstantial matter to collect in subspace (where a ship is a warp) so when they are cruising at sublight the scoops are available for use. I don't believe the collectors have ever been used on screen in any series while at warp.

    More info: http://memory-alpha.org/en/wiki/Bussard_collector
     
  11. JNG

    JNG Chief of Staff, Starfleet Command Rear Admiral

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    Seems to me they would collect vastly, VASTLY more material while at warp (to the extent that we've talked about the possibility of a high-warp "ramjet" on these boards once or twice.)

    Anyway, the TNG Tech Manual supports this idea. We don't actually have much direct reference to the collectors performing their normal function, but it's a background kind of thing and if they're glowing, they are probably workin' :)
     
  12. Mr. B

    Mr. B Vice Admiral Admiral

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    It just occurred to me that the main deflector deflects all matter while at warp due to the incredible damage a single spec could inflict on a vessel traveling faster than light. Even if there is matter to collect while at warp, it would be no easy task.
     
  13. Ronald Held

    Ronald Held Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Why does anyone think that Bussard collectors operate at FTL speeds?
     
  14. nx1701g

    nx1701g Admiral Admiral

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    Energy requirements. It could be, as suggested, that the nacelles collect material through the collectors only while at impulse. That makes sense, if you think about it, because the Deflector would drive away all the hydrogen normally collected while the ship was at warp.

    Captain's Chair (the game that let you explore the ships) suggested that it was done to allow the crew full control over the warp bubble and to alleviate the stresses. It even claimed that warp could be reached at different levels of inclanation for the nacelles.
     
  15. sojourner

    sojourner Admiral Admiral

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    Too bad this was never seen or mentioned in the show.

    As far as when the bussards are actively collecting, has there ever been a canonical statement regarding "not at warp"? I am not sure, but the "always glowing" whether at stand still, impulse power or high warp doesn't really tell us either way.

    If we were to infer that the bussards only get used at impulse speeds, then why have them as part of the warp engine assemblies at all? why not integrate them into the pylon leading edge and make the warp engines fixed in orientation? For that matter, why not integrate the bussard collector into the deflector dish? Both pieces seem to be doing very similar jobs when you think about it.

    I just don't like moving parts without a reason. the more moving parts something has the higher the chances of failure.
     
  16. bullethead

    bullethead Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Actually, the reason the nacelles moved was because the powers that be wanted some part of the ship to articulate for whatever reason (I think it was to look cool), so Sternbach gravitated to the nacelles during the design process.
     
  17. Praetor

    Praetor Vice Admiral Admiral

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    And then the in-universe warp field manipulation rationale was invented.

    Personally, I'd be interested in seeing a drawing of Voyager with nacelle pylons similar to those found on the speedboat shuttle. I have a feeling I might like it more.

    Say, maybe I'll make it. :)
     
  18. Tigger

    Tigger Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    The "Writer's Technical Manual" Rick and Mike created for the show noted that the nacelles employed variable geometry to reduce the deleterious effect of warp drive on space first brought to light in that episode of TNG.
     
  19. Jimmy_C

    Jimmy_C Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    It might make the ship more stealthy too, for the same reasons. If subspace can be "damaged" then it can also be tracked. However, I don't think TPTB ever used this capability of the ship (or the second warp core, or the Aeroshuttle, or...).
     
  20. Klaitu

    Klaitu Commodore Commodore

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    With all the goofy technology that Voyager threw at us, I think we're lucky it didn't transform into a robot.