Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space travel?

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by TheMasterOfOrion, Jan 8, 2014.

  1. Metryq

    Metryq Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2013
    Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

    Actually, the comic called it LHS 2520, not AEY-312, neither of which is real nomenclature. The six-page story does nothing to explain interferometry, or how it is used in astronomy. In fact, no astronomy tools were used to integrate the data—Superman did it all in his head. (Magic.)

    The story invoked black holes and wormholes, both of which are fictitious mathematical constructs, in order to get Superman to Earth "instantaneously" so 27 years later he could witness the destruction of a planet 27 lightyears away. (The Pick-a-card maneuver.)

    How does any of this popularize or introduce real science?
     
  2. sojourner

    sojourner Admiral Admiral

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    Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

    Wait, blackholes are fictional? Huh, guess all that evidence for them is faked.
     
  3. publiusr

    publiusr Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

    Well, rockets are what we have, and they work. I don't buy anti-gravity at all.
    http://www.thespacereview.com/article/2433/1
     
  4. CorporalCaptain

    CorporalCaptain Admiral Admiral

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    Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

    lulz
     
  5. larryman

    larryman Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2007
    Re: Will hard scifi like Gravity get people back 2 science, space trav

    Do you buy gravity? Note... that Earths gravity is not produced by air pressure, or rocket thrust. Overcoming gravity attraction should be as logical as overcoming magnetic attraction - by use of the opposing polarity (Dark Energy?).

    Your linked article states:
    "First of all, getting into space doesn’t require emitting any carbon in principle. Rocket engines are only carbon emitters if they’re burning hydrocarbons; some engines that powered the US Space Shuttles and Saturn rockets burned hydrogen, not carbon."

    The writer glosses over their required burning of kerosene in Saturn Vs' 1st stage, and aluminum in the Shuttles' SRB rockets. Try breathing those exhaust fumes!

    "Well, rockets are what we have..."
    A 19th century automobile:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horse_and_buggy