Why don't they crash?

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by QuarkforNagus, Feb 20, 2014.

  1. Relayer1

    Relayer1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    The chances of colliding are very low. Space is huge, stars are rare and tiny.

    Besides, magic sensors aside, they already know where the stars are and they know where they are and they know where they are headed at what speed - the computer does the rest.

    The viewscreens are not a window or camera view, they are a computer simulation.
     
  2. Timelord Victorious

    Timelord Victorious Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    *Ring,Ring*
    "Yes?... Yes, he is here. just a moment, please."

    Relayer1, phone call for you. A Mr JJ Abrams would like a word with you.

    :rofl:
     
  3. Relayer1

    Relayer1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I prefer to believe that the JJprise has a window equipped with state of the art computer assisted overlay.

    Let's call it a smartwindow...
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2014
  4. rhubarbodendron

    rhubarbodendron Commodore Commodore

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    I'm not quite sure what the newest theories are but there used to be one in the 70s that said that warp drive is quite literally that. You warp space, build a tunnel - an artificial wormhole, basically - and fly through it at a lower speed than light. The result will appear to be hyper-light speed. (So, basically you cheat and just take a shortcut from A to B instead of actually flying faster)

    Such a wormhole would automatically avoid all stars (else it'd get plugged and collapse before it is fully established).
     
  5. Bisz

    Bisz Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    You mean sufficiently enough technology, right? ;)
     
  6. Lieut. Arex

    Lieut. Arex Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    <Navigators
     
  7. publiusr

    publiusr Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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  8. GalaxyX

    GalaxyX Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    If we go by this calculator:

    http://www.anycalculator.com/warpcalculator.htm

    which is based on warp speeds mentioned in several sources:

    Going from Earth to Alpha Centauri at warp 9 would take a full day. At the Enterprise's top speed of warp 9.6, it's still taking 12 hours to get there.

    If we use Voyager's top speed of warp 9.975, It still takes 2 hours to get there.

    Meaning even the fastest ships in the Federation have absolutely zero chance of bumping into any stars at all if they plot a course towards a particular star. Even these insane speeds are not enough to get the odd start here and there to pass them by every few hours or so.

    The star fields and stretch effects might be due to relativistic visual distortions?

    As a note, holy shit Voyager is fast! At top speed they could have made the trip back to Earth in 3.5 years! Why was it going to take them 70 years? They couldn't keep up the top speed?
     
  9. sojourner

    sojourner Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah, they couldn't maintain that speed. It would burn out the engines. It would be like driving a car engine at max rpm. You would greatly decrease the operational life.
     
  10. CorporalCaptain

    CorporalCaptain Admiral Admiral

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    With all this talk about warp drives and such, since this is the science forum, I thought I'd get some actual science here:

    [yt]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_zSpueUqvcs[/yt]​
     
  11. DarthTom

    DarthTom Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Proposed solution. An artificially created wormhole.
     
  12. Australis

    Australis Writer Admiral

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    Good answer, better than what I( was going to say

    That's why they say, plot a course. Also, it's that big flamey thing over there. Addtional: in Australia we have a lot of Dutch shipwreckls off the coast of West Australia, simply because they didn't know it was there... until too late, obvously, the ships hitting reefs in the night, trying to keep the favourable trade winds as along as possible. Once they understood a bit more about navigation, they avoided it.

    This. Thiugh I woulld add I think real star charts would have to be 3D. In the Lensman series they had somethng called 'the Tank' which was used for navigation as well as plotting battle tactics.
     
  13. Silvercrest

    Silvercrest Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Um. I'm trying to decide if you're missing the sarcasm or playing along with it.
     
  14. Edit_XYZ

    Edit_XYZ Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Light emitted from the stars in times past does NOT have to catch up with the ship. The photons are already there, traveling between the stars.
    STL or FTL, the ship will have no problems seeing them.
     
  15. GalaxyX

    GalaxyX Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Hmm, got caught up on the whole actual speed and what it would be like (where even at maximum warp you still technically wouldn't see the stars streak by. They would look as static as they do now, perhaps moving a slight tad, the way the moon might move as we cruise along a hwy in a car)

    This is a good point though. Assuming that the stars in front of you would get blueshifted, and the ones behind you redshifted, does that mean that at FTL travel, the stars in front would blueshift beyond the visible spectrum? And the ones behind redshift out of visual wavelength range as well?
     
  16. Edit_XYZ

    Edit_XYZ Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Light is blue/redshifted by 2 factors:
    -the conventional speed of the ship - meaning blue-shifted before of the ship, red-shifted behind the ship.
    -gravitational/antigravitational fields (the space-time bending which creates the warp field) - gravity bueshifts infalling light, antigravity redshifts infalling light.
     
  17. Zaku

    Zaku Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Uhmm, a ship at warp can interact with objects not at warp?
     
  18. Edit_XYZ

    Edit_XYZ Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Zaku

    Whomever you're quoting, it's not me.

    As to your unclarities:
    Warp - and every other way of travelling FTL - is, by definition, FTL.
    And a ship at warp, within the warp 'bubble', flies STL and interacts just fine with STL objects.
     
  19. Zaku

    Zaku Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    :( Ops! Sorry....
     
  20. T'Girl

    T'Girl Vice Admiral Admiral

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    At which point it runs into a group of other starships over Vulcan.

    Where are those scanners when you really need them?

    :)
     

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